1927 Wire Wheel Rear Hubs

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: 1927 Wire Wheel Rear Hubs
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Donahue on Thursday, September 22, 2016 - 07:38 pm:

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I'm have a '27 with wire wheels and can't seem to be able to remove the rear hubs. Have read numerous posts on the forum, and they all have talked about wheel pullers that need to be threaded onto the hub. As you can see in the picture above my hub has no threading. I've already broken a 2 jaw puller attempting to get these off. Does anyone have any ideas?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Whelihan Danbury, WI on Thursday, September 22, 2016 - 07:49 pm:

I've used a large bearing puller on mine. Works fine.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Donahue on Thursday, September 22, 2016 - 07:49 pm:

Sorry, don't know what I did wrong but picture didn't post. Also the puller I broke was a 3 jaw puller not 2. Will post picture of hub as soon as I can figure out what I did wrong.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Donahue on Thursday, September 22, 2016 - 07:51 pm:

Kevin, do you have a picture of the bearing puller you used?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Donahue on Thursday, September 22, 2016 - 07:58 pm:

rear hub


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Thursday, September 22, 2016 - 08:05 pm:

Here is old post with info on Ford style 2 jaw puller.

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/179374/193242.html?1298619310


Using a big strong two jaw, and maybe modifying the jaw to fit the hub groove you can remove it, hint is to tighten up the puller real snug, then smack the end of the puller screw to 'shock' the taper fit apart. Just tightening the screw for pressure isn't as helpful as the shock to pop the hub taper off the axle taper.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Doolittle on Thursday, September 22, 2016 - 08:53 pm:

This is a very common wheel puller and does a fine job pulling "1927 Wire Wheel Rear Hubs".

Go to your favorite local rental equipment store. Rent it & take it back when done. Buy it if you like it.

Wheel puller


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Warren on Thursday, September 22, 2016 - 10:29 pm:

Tom , the secret to pulling the hubs is to back the nut off a few turns or to flush with the axle. put your puller on and put some tension on the hub with the puller, then use about a 3 lb hammer and strike it straight and hard and it will come off. If you are breaking your puller, you are putting to much tension on your puller. When she moves, go ahead and take the nut off and finish with the puller if needed. Oh and if you break your puller with your hammer, you may have hit it to hard!:-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Whelihan Danbury, WI on Saturday, September 24, 2016 - 06:54 pm:

Tom, sorry for not getting back on the Forum right away with this. Yesterday was a busy, busy day. Anyways, I got this set-up from Harbor Freight. It costs a little under $40 if memory serves me correctly. Does the trick nicely.

Good Lucl!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Eviston on Sunday, September 25, 2016 - 01:33 am:

Tom, any news? If your car runs, you can put the hub nuts on loose-cotter pin them-and drive it around a little. Chuckholes help.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Donahue on Sunday, September 25, 2016 - 10:40 am:

So I bought a similar bearing puller set at Harbor Freight and this morning all I managed to do is bend the puller. Getting tired of spending money on tools and having this hub defeat me. Does anyone have any more suggestions? BTW Jim, I'm currently working on other parts of this car and currently driving is not an option at this time.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Tomaso - Longbranch,WA on Sunday, September 25, 2016 - 11:54 am:

Find someone to "loan" you the proper Ford puller.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Donahue on Sunday, September 25, 2016 - 12:46 pm:

Steve, I'm not being a smart alec, but do you really believe it will do a better job than what I've tried? At the rate I'm destroying tools, I'm not sure I want to risk damaging some one else's tool. I'm planning on attending the Hershey Swap Meet, maybe I can find one there. That being said, I'm not sure I won't damage that one too. I need some other options.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Sunday, September 25, 2016 - 12:50 pm:

A; get the correct hub puller for wire wheel hubs, you are going to need it at some point later anyway.
B; use what John suggested
C; get a hub knocker https://www.modeltford.com/item/2800KO.aspx

The kit shown above just looks too wimpy for the job in my OP. The rear wire wheel hubs I have, got a radius at the bottom of the groove on the side you pull against. The collier needs to be as tight as it can be in the groove. The web looks too thin for the job. The screw in that kit, too long and too small in diameter. First time you give it a good smack with the 3 pound I bet it's going to bend. The force in removing hubs comes from A; pulling and B; shock.
Sounds odd but when removing one hub the side you are removing need to be on the ground and the other side should be off the ground. This allows the shock to push the axle out of the wheel on the ground. It just has to break the contact between the hub and axle. Works for me anyway.
Take the nut off and reinstall it upside down flush with the end of the axle to keep from mushrooming the end of the axle.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Walter Higgins on Sunday, September 25, 2016 - 01:03 pm:

Bashing the screw in the puller mostly works to destroy the threads on the screw. Everything is drawn up tight as a unit. The shock may be aiding in disassembly, but it's not doing the tool any good. You can do the same thing by using a large brass drift, or blurping with an air hammer, on the side of the hub to transmit the shock directly to the hub.

There were other screw-on wheel pullers that were designed to be hit like that because the screw was drilled thru for a pin and it was the pin that was intended to be hit with the hammer. With this set-up, everything is drawn up tight and, when struck, the pin is pushing the axle from the hub rather than bashing everything as a unit.

Find one of these at Hershey:

https://www.willysjeepparts.com/gallery2/d/20805-3/C-319-OEM.JPG

They're typically about $50 bucks and I've never had mine fail after taking apart some stuff that was unbelievably stuck.

(Message edited by WMH on September 25, 2016)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Sunday, September 25, 2016 - 01:07 pm:

tom, you NEED the Hub Puller tool, the bearing pulling kit above and a bearing puller just aren't heavy duty enough for the job. be sure and leave the nut on the axle (loose, of course) or you will mushroom the end of the axle. Besides whacking the end, you can also put two hammers on either side of the hub neck and give it a whack with one while it's under tension, apparently your hubs are very well seated on the axle--a good thing until you want to separate them!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Sunday, September 25, 2016 - 01:22 pm:

If the hub hasn't been off in years, or appears rusted and axle is rusted fast, no paint or any grease anywhere, just rust. Then use heat from a torch to break the rusted axle from the hub.

If mostly painted, in good condition and seems to be in overall condition for tool removal, then you can use the 'knock-off' type tool. Of course a very heavy two-jaw that fits, or the Ford rear hub tool for wire wheel hub is best.

But, with a 3-5lb. mallet, strong blows will part the taper joint contact of the hub and axle shaft. Once shocked apart, the hub can be pulled.



Clean the exposed threads of the axle shaft, and around the hub area with wire brush, then squirt with a plastic tube fitted to aerosol can of top brands penetrating oil (Kroil or PB Blaster),that will seep some into the joint.

Follow the directions for the 'knock off' tool. Thread it on fully, over the cleaned axle threads. Then it is best to have the wheel/tire on the ground.

Then raise the opposite wheel/tire off the ground. Reason, you are going to smack the axle back into the fixed hub/wheel/tire which is on the ground and can't move. But the smack will move the axle shaft slightly, letting that Morse-like taper of the axle shaft and hub to be popped loose.

Then you can pull manually the hub off the axle shaft.

The Ford tools work similar, but have the pull ability as they are locked to the hub. The wood wheel type screws over the threads of the hub cap on those hubs. The wire wheel puller arms fit into the groove of the wire wheel hubs.



But with these styles of pullers, you still have to 'shock' the axle shaft taper and hub tapers apart so the pull can happen. That is why the 4lb. mallet is in this photo. Fit the puller fast on the hub, tighten the center bolt against the axle shaft with a large wrench. When tight, smack the center bolt. Once, twice, or then re-tighten the center bolt if it loosens. Then when it comes apart, you will hear a loud "pop-pow" as the joint is separated. Use gloves, eye protection too, and be careful as with a good heavy smack the hub tool, if its a two-jaw puller, can fly off the wire wheel hub.




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Tomaso - Longbranch,WA on Sunday, September 25, 2016 - 01:48 pm:

No offense taken, Tom. Been in the T hobby a long time & I operate a restoration shop - gotta have the right tool for the job to make it worth the effort !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Tomaso - Longbranch,WA on Sunday, September 25, 2016 - 01:50 pm:

One other point when using most any type of puller - insert a new cotter pin or section of one to fill in the hole to prevent collapse !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Eviston on Sunday, September 25, 2016 - 02:16 pm:

Steve, glad you brought that up. When a newby about 37 or so years ago I did that very thing. The axle shafts turned out to be no good, it was just a rear end I was parting out.So after that I put a nail in the hole.
Once, again while helping one of the old timers, we did the following. He welded about an inch and a half piece of half inch pipe onto two extra hub nuts. We then put these on each rear hub,not tight or even snug. With both rear wheels on the ground,and his ample daughter in the backseat,each of us with a sledge on either side. We got an alternate rhythm going and they popped loose. One of many ways to skin a T, so to speak.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Woods, Richmond, Texas on Sunday, September 25, 2016 - 04:12 pm:

Tom, a modified pitman arm puller as Drew Womack pictured in the former post that Dan Trease posted, above. is probably the best substitute for the original Ford puller. Notice how 'beefy' the original Ford puller is. I think the trick is to use a two jaw puller with FIXED jaws, instead of a two or even three jaw puller with movable jaws. The fixed jaw puller's jaws are thicker, stronger, and have less joints at which to bend or break. If you do, try to buy a brand like Craftsman that are guaranteed against breakage. That way, you're not out money if things don't work as they're supposed to. PS. I've never seen an original Ford puller damaged from proper use, unless abused. About the only thing that can be hurt on them is the treads on the threaded screw.


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