TT wheel rim

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: TT wheel rim
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By jay on Monday, September 26, 2016 - 02:44 pm:

'26 TT rear wheel, 30 x 5 (6.00 x 20) tire.
What is the purpose of the notch on the rim?
How is the tire removed...3 arm rim tool for Ts or conventional tire removal machine used by modern tire dealers?
Picture attached.
Thank you for all information.TT wheel rim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Justin H. - Western PA on Monday, September 26, 2016 - 03:39 pm:

That notch is each end of a ring that fits into a groove on the outer edge of the rim. The ring must be removed with tire irons which will allow the tire to be removed. I highly recommend that you take it to a tire shop that specializes in heavy truck tires to have the work done. An improperly mounted ring can fly off during inflation and mame or kill any living thing in its path.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By mike_black SC/FL on Monday, September 26, 2016 - 08:53 pm:

Jay,
This is one of those cases when "What you don't know WILL hurt you." It's a locking rim that can kill you if you don't know what you're doing. You'll probably have to find an old guy to show you, because most tire shops won't touch it. Good luck.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tt newbee Thomas R. Hicks Central Va. on Monday, September 26, 2016 - 09:06 pm:

I recently had mine done at a tire shop that does mostly truck tires. They have one old guy who does TT tires. A younger guy who works there told me that the old guy is the only one crazy enough to change them.

They charged $45/tire, I think it was money well spent.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Miller, Sequim WA on Monday, September 26, 2016 - 11:45 pm:

Jay, the gap in the snap ring in your picture is too much. The cause is probably due to rust or dirt between the rim and the snap ring. It can also be caused by over bending this snap ring during removal.

I have used pipe style furniture clamps to bend the rings back closed again. Be diligent to get the groove and snap ring cleaned up in order to properly mate.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Tuesday, September 27, 2016 - 02:50 am:

Yeah, those rims are dangerous, the real danger part is ignorance. They are easy to work with, IF (huge, HUGE, if!) you know what you are doing, and take proper precautions. I have been working with them since I was twelve, more than fifty years now. I like them. I like changing tires on those rims. Not hard work at all (as long as they are not somehow damaged or rust-welded together). It does help to have the proper rim tool for the rim you have, and there are several variations.
The tire MUST be pried or pushed back (inward) a bit before the ring can be removed. DO NOT FORCE the ring. You (or whoever works with it) MUST check ring, rim, and groove for any signs of damage, cracks, out-of-round, misalignment, etc.
Great care MUST be taken during assembly to be certain that everything seats the way it should.
AIRING UP the TIRE is the MOST DANGEROUS part of the whole process.
There is a best right way to do it. But very few people have or have access to, the right tool to do it. There are several other ways, tricks, and safety steps, that can work well and keep you safe EVEN IF the rim explodes. But, THE MOST IMPORTANT RULE, is never, NEVER, be on the ring side of the rim when putting air into the tire! The second rule is to air up SLOWLY at least until the rim, ring, and tire, are ALL FULLY seated, and the tire pressure is at least 20 psi.

The simple fact is, there are many variations of rims. Many, many possible problems, about half of which do have the potential to kill you. Many antique automobiles use similar type split (two piece, split ring, etc) rims, especially cars and trucks from around 1908 into the early '30s. The other type of "split rim" that uses a rim jack is a totally different animal, and virtually as safe as a modern drop-center rim. (Another comment on that later.)
The best thing to do, is to find someone near you that has the proper experience, and would be willing to spend an hour or two to show you some of the tricks and procedures.
While I have never been a "professional" tire man? I have been working with these type rims on family trucks, my dad's trucks, my older modern pickups that had them, as well as my, and other people's, antique cars (including the TT I had years ago). I have had them apart and put them together probably literally hundreds of times. I have had a couple close calls, headed off by my being careful. But I have never had a split ring rim explode. The funny thing is? I have twice had modern drop-center rims explode. And they are supposed to be safe.
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Tuesday, September 27, 2016 - 08:10 am:

Widow maker!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Tuesday, September 27, 2016 - 08:11 am:

Widow maker! Beware!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By jeff cordes on Tuesday, September 27, 2016 - 10:29 am:

The rim pictured is missing the collar around the valve stem that keeps the rim from slipping on the fellow. I don't know that the rim pictured is even a TT rim.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Adam Doleshal on Tuesday, September 27, 2016 - 01:33 pm:

The style of rims that have rightfully earned the reputation of "Widow Makers" are 3-piece lock-ring rims.

The TT rims are 2-piece lock-ring rims.

While it always does pay to be cautious and careful, and to never work outside of your comfort zone OR experience level; The TT "2 piece", "lock-ring" rims are not the same style rims as the ones that have earned a gruesome reputation for killing and injuring people.

But be well aware that ANYTHING you don't fully understand or have experience with IS potentially harmful.

With that said: I change ANY Model T tire on ANY rim for anybody for $20. I am located in S.E. Wisconsin 30 minutes West of Milwaukee.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Adam Doleshal on Tuesday, September 27, 2016 - 01:40 pm:

Jeff, There are a couple variations of TT rims. Some have a lug attached to the inside to keep the rim from spinning on the wheel. Some utilize the collar around the valve stem as a lug (as shown in the picture).

Fred, The gap in the snap ring in the photo does look real wide, but is not unusual.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tt newbee Thomas R. Hicks Central Va. on Tuesday, September 27, 2016 - 07:01 pm:

Adam, thank you for your 1:33 post.

I had the tires on my TT professionally changed at a truck shop. I would have gotten them done that way regardless of what I had read on this forum or heard from others. I wanted them right and I do not expect to have to buy new tires often so I did not want to take the time to learn to do it myself for one change.

BUT, I had a fear of my rear tires after I got them back. It was a fear that they would explode based on what I had read and heard. Did I want to be near these tires? Did I want anyone else near these tires? The whole point of getting new tires was to make TT as safe as possible for myself and others.

I could not find anything on-line about TT tires exploding. Apparently back in the day drivers would change them on the side of the road. So something did not add up.

Your post makes a lot of sense to me and I will take it as gospel. I no longer fear being next to a rear tire on TT! For that, I thank you.

Now my question is, why did no one else on the forum post this info?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By jay on Tuesday, September 27, 2016 - 07:06 pm:

Many thanks to everyone.
I heeded your advice and brought the rim and tire to a shop.
The owner is an old timer and he knew all about TT rims.
He placed the rim and tire in a roll cage while he inflated the tire.
Fortunately the ring didn't fly away.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Tuesday, September 27, 2016 - 07:33 pm:

Just a note of emphasis:

Some years ago I was present when our school bus shop mechanic was airing up a tire he had just mounted on a lock ring rim. It let go (blew up) as he added air. Very fortunately he was using a tire cage. It scared the crap out of all who were nearby, me included, but no one was hurt. I wish I had taken a photo of the tire cage afterwords. The force of the ring popping off bent it out of shape to the extent that it had to be replaced. Without the cage the mechanic and possibly me would have been seriously injured or killed.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Justin H. - Western PA on Tuesday, September 27, 2016 - 08:18 pm:

TT rims are perfectly safe as long as they are in good shape and assembled properly. There is a very positive locking lip on the edge for the ring to hold into. The problem usually comes after the ring is removed. If a tire is stuck and a person pries the tire off using the edge of the rim as a fulcrum for their tire iron, the rim lip gets smashed and no longer able to accept the ring properly. If the ring does not seat fully in this rim, the risk of it blowing off is very good. My TT had a rim like this where half of the ring wasn't in the lip of the rim. Someone got very lucky. Many people do not pay attention to detail and should not try changing these themselves.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Tillstrom 30 miles N of Memphis TN on Tuesday, September 27, 2016 - 08:38 pm:

I worked in a tire store as a kid and changed a bunch of semi tires. That is the best style and the safest. Lacking a cage, I wrapped TT rims with chain. The other advice to keep the ring pointed away from you is sound advice.

One day at work we had a skinny guy airing a tire in the cage. He was smoking a cigarette sitting on a block not paying attention. One of the other guys threw a firecracker behind him. That's how the fight started.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Hagerty on Tuesday, September 27, 2016 - 10:07 pm:

The firecracker stunt reminded me of this. At a shop I worked a few years ago, I had the noise of machinery running when, outside there was a terrific BANG then a loud scream! I ran to the door thinking the worst. As it turned out, one of our drivers was putting air in one of the left rear split ring wheels on the truck. It was a flatbed with an all steel deck. The foreman (of all people) sneaked up on the other side with a long handled 5 pound sledge and clobbered the deck! Much cussing to say the least!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Sunday, October 02, 2016 - 01:21 am:

Make sure you have the correct ring for the rim you have. I have seen several flat base rims (which these are) over the years that were mismatched, that is, they were from different manufacturers. Mismatched rims and rings don't play well together! :-(


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