Using up the parts

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Using up the parts
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Monday, September 26, 2016 - 04:58 pm:


The is the 1915 touring Don Lang has for sale. Its engine assembly date is Friday, October 1, 1915. As the car has 1915 features but the engine date is in the 1916 model year, I wonder if it's a replacement engine. But that's not the subject of this post.


This is my roadster with an engine assembly date of Thursday, June 17, 1915.

I suspect this is a result of different assembly plants running out of different parts at different times.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Jorgensen, Batavia, IL on Monday, September 26, 2016 - 05:49 pm:

Assuming the MTFCI Judging Guidelines are correct, the 1915 model year ran from Jan. 1915 to Oct 1915 (engine # 656064-914026). 1916 model year ran from Oct 1915- July 1916 (engine # 914027-1362989). An Oct 1 1915 assembly date = 1915.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Monday, September 26, 2016 - 05:59 pm:

It's certainly possible, but I'm sure that if a car was restored that way and entered in an MTFCI event, it would get points taken off unless you had a period photograph of that particular car on the assembly line proving that it was built that way.

Even if the mismatched pedals had been together for 50 years, that's only half the life of the cars in question - all sorts of things could have happened during the car's first 50 years. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chadwick Azevedo on Monday, September 26, 2016 - 06:26 pm:

Just remember it was built on "Friday" might explain a lot.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tony Bowker, Ramona, CA on Monday, September 26, 2016 - 06:37 pm:

I would guess that the low band on the June 15 has been replaced , it is the toughest one to change, so many years ago someone could have cut off the old one and installed a later one.
The brake on the Lang car could be either way, replaced or original who knows....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tony Bowker, Ramona, CA on Monday, September 26, 2016 - 06:41 pm:

I thought the engine/transmission assembly was built at the main plant, while the various assembly plants received complete engine and just put subassemblies together. In that case I would lean towards the brake pedal being replaced during a repair.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Tuesday, September 27, 2016 - 12:27 pm:

Royce posted this back a while ago.

Royce in Dallas TX on Saturday, May 12, 2012 - 07:26 am:
June 1915 it would be typical to see mixed pedals on a new Model T. The change happened at the foundry level in March 1915. Here's the notice to dealers from the encyclopedia:

MAR 22 Acc. 1701. Model T Releases, Ford Archives

"Have removed the grooves from the surface of the foot (pedal) pads, making them smooth, with a fify-five degree bevel 1/16" deep around the edge. Also changed the thickness of pads at edges from 5/32 to 1/8", leaving then 5/32" thick at each side of arm where it joins pad. This change to take place when dies are resunk, all forgings which we have on hand at that time to be used up." (Joseph Galamb)


So if the smooth pedals are original period, then the specs should tell by measuring those pedals if they match, otherwise they may have been replaced in later years.

Later pedals have various dimensions on the shaft and pedal too, some seem more robust than the earlier pedals.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Jorgensen, Batavia, IL on Tuesday, September 27, 2016 - 01:15 pm:

For what it is worth, I purchased my Sept 1915 built car with mixed petals also. I have no idea if they are original to the car or not.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Seelman on Tuesday, September 27, 2016 - 02:28 pm:

My April 1915 touring has smooth pedals


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Tuesday, September 27, 2016 - 03:51 pm:

"This change to take place when dies are resunk,"
Since we don't know how much wear and tear it was on the forging dies - maybe they had several operating in parallel? Thus it's hard to tell how often they were resunk and consequently when the change was done.

We know there were several wood patterns used at the same time for engine block casting, thus the period when engines were made with both single and twin valve covers was stretched to several months over the winter 1921-22 until the last pattern for twin covers was worn out and replaced.

In Canada the pedals were made with grooves well into the 20's


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Tuesday, September 27, 2016 - 06:55 pm:

This thread is a good example why its hard to know exactly what year a car is sometimes. Using up parts, shipping bodies to distribution points and not being sold for that year are things that happened during production. The only time a T was pure was when it came off the assembly line. After that and after 90-100 years things could have been replaced or altered. After all Henry made his cars so things would fit most T's! Not all but a lot!


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