Why not use lockwashers inside wooden wheel hubs?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Why not use lockwashers inside wooden wheel hubs?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Laughary on Tuesday, September 27, 2016 - 08:01 am:

After searching for weeks to purchase another wheel I have decided to just fix the loose spokes myself. It probably won't take me longer than the seven hour round trip to the nearest used wheels I found, and I will be more self-reliant from the experience.

That said, I am wondering how this group feels about using lock washers on the inside of wooden wheel rear brake hubs.

Peening the tips of the bolts seems to be the current standard, but that ruins the threads and does not keep the nuts from backing off partially, itt only keep them from falling off.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Tuesday, September 27, 2016 - 08:13 am:

Another option would be shipping the used wheels.

There's not much space in there, so the extra washer may get the nuts in contact with the brake parts?
The original bolts ends almost in flush with the nuts, so proper peening stops all movement. Though you may want to let the wheels rest a day or two after tightening, then tighten some more before finally peening them. Beware of overtightening original bolts - they're a bit soft. RV Anderson makes better repros.

One idea may be to file the holes in the brake drums square and turn the screws inside out - then you can easily check how tight they are - and fit lock washers :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Laughary on Tuesday, September 27, 2016 - 09:27 am:

Ok Thank You!

Still trying to get the hub off, so I'm ordering a couple tools as soon as I figure out which spokes to order.

Chasing parts and decrypting vehicle-specific lingo slows the process. I eventually find one metal rim & correct hub to send for rebuilding, but I don't want to send what I have because I won't be able to drive while it's gone. Like my grandfather used to say, "if we had some ham we would have having eggs… If we had eggs..."


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stephen D Heatherly on Tuesday, September 27, 2016 - 01:15 pm:

Chris, if you're worried about the nuts turning stake the nut into the bolt with a center punch after you tighten them up. That really is not completely necessary because unless the bolts are too long peening works just fine. Like Roger mentioned, after you tighten the bolts wait a day or two then tighten them again. Several of them will move more.

Stephen


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Laughary on Tuesday, September 27, 2016 - 02:43 pm:

Thank You for putting me in the path to a solution.

Replacing spokes in a demountable rear wheel seems like it will not require a press or a spoke jack. I finally figured out that those videos I was watching were showing how difficult it is to assemble non-demountable wheels.

I'm bad about waiting... anxious for tools and parts now.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Eviston on Tuesday, September 27, 2016 - 02:50 pm:

Replacing spokes in a demountable wheel emphatically requires force. See Steve Jelph's excellent video.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Eviston on Tuesday, September 27, 2016 - 02:53 pm:

Why did sPELLCheck do it? Jelf.


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