Harvesting reed

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Harvesting reed
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jesse L. Ashcraft on Tuesday, October 04, 2016 - 11:02 am:

The rubber bulb and the hose of my Rubes bulb horn aren't going to make the transition. The rubber has deteriorated to the point of rubbing off on my hand and the brass hose is unraveling. So in the new Mac's catalog page 76 & Snyders page T-67, I noticed the diagram of the system where the reed is next to the horn. When I took mine apart, the reed was next to the bracket under the bulb.

- Does it matter which end the reed is on? As I recall, mine seemed to work OK but I was wondering if a louder horn could be achieved if the reed was next to the horn.
- With that in mind, does anyone have experience or knowledge of rigging a reed on both ends (in opposite directions) so the horn would sound on the inhale as well as the exhale?
- Also, my hose is only 20" long and I see where all the kits come with either 4' or 5' of hose. Does the length of conduit have something to do with a judging criterion? Could you get a louder burst with a shorter hose since you're not moving a lot air or do I have that backwards?

I plan on replacing the 3" bulb with a 4" aiming for the most robust honk. Anyone have an opinion or a story?



(Message edited by jesselashcraft on October 04, 2016)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Hoshield; Oak Park MI on Tuesday, October 04, 2016 - 12:17 pm:

I ran into the same issue, except I just had the horn itself and the reed in a 1/2 a bulb! LOL.... as, with all the parts I ordered... I couldn't mount the reed in the long extension tube and adapter at the horn... I ended up putting it in three long but at the bulb. There was a short adapter, doubel-threaded... that connected to the new brass tubing. The salvaged reed screwed into the inside of the adapter, with the duck bill (reed tongue) pointing out... the long adapter then screwed onto the adapters outer thread. Lastly, the bulb and it's brass support collar slid on. I slid it on to within an inch or two I'd the adapter. Honks great! I had to de-solder the reed tongue, to re-set it, as was sprung away from the curved bottom plate, and it would only honk with a too violent squeeze of the bulb. So... some adjustment might be necessary.

Best of luck!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Tuesday, October 04, 2016 - 08:18 pm:

Jesse,

Please see Royce's comments about the bulb horns and locations of the reeds and how they changed etc. It is located at: http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/506218/556284.html?1437609856

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Tuesday, October 04, 2016 - 08:43 pm:

Here's another useful thread on the '14 horn:

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/411944/496499.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jesse L. Ashcraft on Wednesday, October 05, 2016 - 09:37 am:

Thanks for the links fellas. I've figured out why my searches here have been coming up lame. The search field is defaulted to the last 3 days. No wonder.

So it looks like my Rubes was a typical setup of the period except the horn was apparently never painted.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Brad Van Meter on Wednesday, October 05, 2016 - 01:18 pm:

Go to the hardware store and purchase hose that connects to an icemaker (clear with braid). This hose will fit inside the brass hose line and gives a direct "gust" from the horn bulb to the horn reed. No one knows the difference except the person that you are honking at!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jesse L. Ashcraft on Thursday, October 06, 2016 - 10:32 am:

Thanks for the tip, Brad but when I took my horn apart, I discovered that the reed was housed in the adapter that connects to the mounting bracket at the bulb so the reed is actually inside the bulb and the noise is already produced when it gets to the hose. I've been reading some old threads here and apparently, that was the configuration between 1913 and 1915 (my car's vintage) for better performance. At this point, I think all I need to refurbish this horn is a couple feet of conduit and a new bulb but I'm trying to achieve the highest volume so I'll keep your advise in mind.

>>>The salvaged reed screwed into the inside of the adapter...<<<

Hi Dennis - My reed doesn't have any threads on it. It was soldered into the bulb bracket fixture and the 3" long adapter (the bulb slips onto) is screwed on over it. Replacing these old parts can be a tricky business considering all the modifications.



Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Thursday, October 06, 2016 - 07:33 pm:

The photos above are indeed of an original setup. I wouldn't pay attention to anything in Snyders or Mac's catalogs. Another problem is on original parts, they seem to have used two different TPI'S, and that has always worried me. If you wish to get good information, contact RV Anderson.
The reed does go up by the bulb.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Thursday, October 06, 2016 - 07:49 pm:

Brass was hopelessly out of style by mid 1912 when Ford started installing the black painted single twist horns. Yours was painted originally, like all of them.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jesse L. Ashcraft on Friday, October 07, 2016 - 11:17 am:

>>>Yours was painted originally, like all of them...<<<

Henry Ford was not my daddy. My philosophy - if you have a brass car, flaunt that bling it like a rap star.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Friday, October 07, 2016 - 01:54 pm:

Jesse that's fine. Telling us it was never painted is a problem because that is not the truth.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard E Moore Jr. Pickwick lake Tenn. on Friday, October 07, 2016 - 05:25 pm:

Brad meter. Good advice. If the metal hose is leaking at all the horn won't work properly. I'll be installing one this weekend. Thanks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Townsend ; ^ ) Gresham, Orygun on Saturday, October 08, 2016 - 11:22 am:

On my late 1911, the reed in in the horn. Maybe it will sound better if I re-locate it to in the bulb...

: ^ )


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jesse L. Ashcraft on Saturday, October 08, 2016 - 11:35 am:

>>>Telling us it was never painted is a problem because that is not the truth.<<<

Well, let me put it this way - when I bought the car, the Rubes was unpainted. In my reference book, "From Here to Obscurity", at the top of page 111, the 1913 example car they used has an unpainted Non-pareil on it and the caption reads:


quote:

The horn has been changed to an all-brass single-twist style which protrudes through the dashboard to the interior of the car. Made by "non-pareil," these horns are later found painted black except for the bell, but the all-brass construction persisted. Earlier horns were unpainted.




So I guess if this horn actually came with the car, (In "The Car that Changed the World" under Horn, for 1913-1914 page 440, it says "Now made of steel with brass trim.") someone went to the trouble to remove the paint before I bought it and they did an excellent job getting the paint out of every crack and crevice. This is the book however, that puts the 1914 production year (they say there is evidence that the production year coincided with the fiscal year and the production year was moved to Aug 1st later) beginning Oct 1st, 1913 with serial number 370,148 whereas my engine number is 346,779 indicating the assembly on Sep 25th, 1913.

As I've mentioned before, unless the motor was replaced at some point with an earlier engine, I may have some sort of unique 'tweener where they were using up old inventory with the new parts to fashion a mutt. I'm not worried about it though. My favorite dogs were mutts. It is what it is.

(Message edited by jesselashcraft on October 08, 2016)


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