Does anyone know what these wheels fit?

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Does anyone know what these wheels fit?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Schrope - Upland, IN on Friday, October 07, 2016 - 12:33 pm:





Warren Miller has them for sale but has no idea of what they fit. There are three. No rims, just wheels. Excellent condition and heavy.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Friday, October 07, 2016 - 03:24 pm:

Maybe the hubcaps can tell something with a close up photo?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Walker on Friday, October 07, 2016 - 03:31 pm:

Apparently General Motors and Hayes Wheel Corporation -- no names of the other ten car manufacturers so supplied:

JAXON STEEL PRODUCTS COMPANY

"This company, first known as the Jackson Rim Company, was organized in 1911-12 and head by Mr. O.W. Mott, who went from the Mott Wheel Works at Utica, New York, to Jackson, Michigan, and established this industry as an overflow from Utica works. Operations began in 193, but the real expansion dates from 1917 when the Perlman Rim Corporation of New York took over the company. Later the organization operated as a division of United Motors and was taken over by General Motors January 1, 1919.

It manufactured automobile rims, felloes, wheels, tire carriers, battery box hangers, and stampings. In 1923 it produced 1,050,000 sets of rims. There were normally 1,050 to 1,150 employees. Floor space totaled 201,000 square feet, about eight acres being comprised in buildings, sidings, etc. Beside General Motors some ten other car manufacturers were supplied with equipment, and the Hayes Wheel Company, with certain materials.

All the assets of the Jaxon Steel Products Company were sold to and taken over by the Kelsey-Hayes Wheel Corporation of Jackson, June 19, 1930."

THE TURNING WHEEL, THE STORY OF GENERAL MOTOR THROUGH TWENTY-FIVE YEARS, 1908-1933; by Arthur Pound


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Friday, October 07, 2016 - 05:33 pm:

What's the diameter of the fellow rim?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Eviston on Friday, October 07, 2016 - 06:09 pm:

Just as today, there was considerable interchange of wheels. My 1940 Hollander manual has a wheel interchange in sets section but it only goes back to about '25.Those wheels are quite a bit older. Get close up of hub cap.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Schrope - Upland, IN on Friday, October 07, 2016 - 09:22 pm:

David Dewey
I'll have to check on that next week.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Friday, October 07, 2016 - 09:52 pm:

I believe they are Maxwell Model 25. 1915 thru late teens. Hang on and I'll get some pictures of mine.
Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Friday, October 07, 2016 - 10:04 pm:

These were taken off of a 1916 Maxwell rear axle. Howard Dennis could tell us how late they used these.






Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Friday, October 07, 2016 - 10:28 pm:

My front wheels have Stanweld wheel rims that say patent applied for. The tire rims are Pearlman and have the same patent number as your Jaxson wheel rims:1,052,270. I assume that all these makers were using the same patent.




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Friday, October 07, 2016 - 10:33 pm:

The patent doesn't really reflect what I see here.

https://www.google.com/patents/US1052270?dq=1052270&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjAqLrs lMrPAhVG42MKHSOgAzgQ6AEIIzAB


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Eviston on Friday, October 07, 2016 - 11:22 pm:

The Coke bottle frame I mentioned in another thread is 1914 Maxwell. Anybody want it pm me. Near North Manchester indiana.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Schrope - Upland, IN on Saturday, October 08, 2016 - 08:12 am:

Interesting ideas. I'll have to check the rims next week.
Thanks


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Howard D. Dennis Byron, Georgia on Saturday, October 08, 2016 - 11:52 am:

Rich, I wish I could shed some light on this mystery that has puzzled me every since I acquired my 1917 Maxwell. It had one rear wheel like this and 3 that had the wooden felloe but it was barely visible because the rim wraps over the edge and hides the felloe. I have a 1916 parts book and a 1919 and they don't clear up anything but they do note something else I also discovered. Not only were there different style wheels but during this 1916-19 period the hubs were made in at least 3 different versions as the parts books list 2 3/8 x 16, 2 3/8 x 24 and 2 1/2 x 16 hubcaps. I'd be willing to bet the hubcaps pictured here are 2 3/8 x 16 and that is what I've found mainly on 1916 and earlier. These always are plain with no name. 1917 and later I've found have the Maxwell name and are 2 3/8 x 24 threads per inch. As my car's frame showed damage from several side impacts I believe that explains my mixed wheel types. I've found Maxwell was constantly changing parts all through the production years I've been involved with 1914-1919 and it makes it very hard to find the correct part and pin down when the changes occurred. To me it shows they were not only dealing with a changing supplier network but also improving their product as it was being made. I ran into a problem with mine when everyone told me my Atwater-Kent distributor was wrong and "All" 1917 Maxwell's should have a Simms-Huff magneto. It took me years of research to discover Simms workers went on strike mid 1917 and left Maxwell with no electrical system. Luckily Atwater-Kent had just invented a distributor coil package that bolted on in place of magnetos and this not only saved Maxwell it made their product more modern as well. So I learned I owned a "late" 1917 Maxwell, something I've only found mentioned in very few period books. Isn't it fun trying to restore this stuff to period correctness?!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Saturday, October 08, 2016 - 01:18 pm:

Thanks Howard. Part of the fun of the old car hobby is that often questions are answered with more questions. It does make it interesting if not frustrating. I'll have to check out my other rims.
That being said I still believe the wheel in question is probably some year Maxwell 1915 to 1919.
Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Howard D. Dennis Byron, Georgia on Saturday, October 08, 2016 - 05:53 pm:

My experience has been they are found on 1916 and prior but have never found them on a later car.

Howard Dennis


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Howard D. Dennis Byron, Georgia on Saturday, October 08, 2016 - 05:55 pm:

My experience has been they are found on 1916 and prior but have never found them on a later car.

Howard Dennis


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Saturday, October 08, 2016 - 09:25 pm:

Howard
Your "wrap around" wheels sound a lot like the wheels found on '17 Dodge Brothers, although I don't know if they were considered Stanweld or Dodge made. They do seem to be found on the Dodges built for the military.
It is possible that substitute wheels were put on your car--something that would interchange with the rims on it.
David D.
PS The Dodge wheels were 25" wheels.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Howard D. Dennis Byron, Georgia on Saturday, October 08, 2016 - 11:36 pm:

David, pretty sure the 3 wrapped wheels are correct for my car as it is all I have ever seen on 1917 and later Maxwells. What is the hubcap size and thread on the Dodge wheels?

Howard Dennis


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Howard D. Dennis Byron, Georgia on Saturday, October 08, 2016 - 11:44 pm:

Just checked some pictures of 1918 Dodges online and the wheels look similar but have 7 rim clamps holding on the rim and mine has 5.

Howard Dennis


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Sunday, October 09, 2016 - 12:11 am:

Number of rim clamps does vary! But I think my '16s wheels have 6 clamps (can't get to them right now) Hubcaps are 2.5" but I can't measure the TPI.


Add a Message


This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Username:  
Password:

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration