Grey wood

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Grey wood
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim on Tuesday, October 11, 2016 - 01:50 pm:

Looking for ideas on reconditioning spokes that have been weathered. Any thoughts on treating them prior to paint or poly?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By ALAN FAIRCLOUGH from Houston, TEXAS on Tuesday, October 11, 2016 - 01:54 pm:

soak with linseed oil


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ted Dumas on Tuesday, October 11, 2016 - 01:59 pm:

If they are so bad they need "body work " they likely need to be replaced. You might make them look good but structurally they are no better than you started with. A new owner might thing they were fantastic when really they were just prettied up.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim on Tuesday, October 11, 2016 - 02:28 pm:

How will linseed oil effect the color and the "stickiness" of paint later on?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron in Central Massachusetts on Tuesday, October 11, 2016 - 02:37 pm:

Tim,

All my stuff is done in linseed. It will darken the wood, but soaks in enough not to leave a residual stickiness.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron in Central Massachusetts on Tuesday, October 11, 2016 - 02:39 pm:

If you're asking how it will affect how pain adheres, I have painted over linseed-treated metal and wood without issue.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Tuesday, October 11, 2016 - 04:25 pm:

Linseed oil will make wood shiny. It does nothing to restore strength to rotted wood.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham on Tuesday, October 11, 2016 - 04:47 pm:

A light "scrub" with 50/50 linseed oil/turps (or mineral spirits) and a fine Scotchbrite pad may return grey weathered wood to its original color.

If you apply so much linseed oil that the surface becomes shiny upon drying, that's too much, unless you wish to leave it that way; linseed oil is actually categorized as a "varnish". It makes a good preservative coat, and a good primer for oil-base paints, but as Royce points out, will not restore rotted wood. Heck, nothing restores rotted wood, except new wood !

Wheels that are grey from weathering need to be inspected for rot at the felloes and hubs.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Conger on Thursday, October 13, 2016 - 05:41 am:

there is a major difference between "raw" and "boiled" linseed oil...they're two very different animals. Anyone wishing to dabble with this on their wood will do themselves a great service by understanding the differences before applying...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Hatch on Thursday, October 13, 2016 - 06:24 am:

The linseed oil will help kept the spokes from changing size with the changing humidity in the air. You will not have to drive into the creek and soak the spokes like the old timers did.

What works better is MBRT, but is more mess than Linseed oil. :-) Dan


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Thursday, October 13, 2016 - 09:58 am:

I used a mixture of Boiled Linseed Oil (BLO) and Rustoleum semi-gloss black out of the can (3 parts BLO 1 part Rustoleum) and rubbed it in when I built my Pick-up bed 3 years ago still looks good with great water repellent properties :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Thursday, October 13, 2016 - 09:59 am:

Borderline wheels are like borderline radiators. There comes a time when they need to be replaced.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim on Friday, October 14, 2016 - 02:16 pm:

yeah these seem solid, just ugly.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Verne Shirk on Friday, October 14, 2016 - 05:16 pm:

I'd start by Google-ing "why does wood turn gray?". Read the explanations then decide what to do about a finish. I had the same problem with some trim on an old house. The way I look at it is...the gray is "stuff" you don't want as a base for your finish. Too much of it on a spoke makes the spoke weak.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick in Florida on Friday, October 14, 2016 - 06:38 pm:

I would bleach the spokes to remove the ugly grey color and turn them almost white. After you rinse and let them thoroughly dry, sand the grain smooth with 100 grit sandpaper. Bare wood that is exposed to water is usually left with sanding wood grain that makes the wood feel prickly. This needs to be sanded smooth. Then apply Minwax Pecan Polyshades Polyurethane (Polyurethane with the stain mixed in). You may need to apply several coats allowing the prior coat to dry. The color you get will be a warm aged color. You will not be disappointed.

There are several different Polyshade colors to choose from, if you don't want Pecan: Golden Oak, Red Oak, Mahoghany, Walnut. It's just that out of all the selections, I believe Pecan is the nicest for the Model T. Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick in Florida on Friday, October 14, 2016 - 06:44 pm:

PS. Grey wood does not necessarily mean the wood is weak or rotten. A new bare wood deck or dock that is allowed to weather will turn grey within a few weeks, but will not be any weaker. The grey is only a surface condition and can be easily sanded off until the original color is reached, but it is important to apply a good finish to seal the wood so it will not rot and will maintain its' color. Jim Patrick


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