Old Photo - If Old Photos Could Speak

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Old Photo - If Old Photos Could Speak
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Friday, October 14, 2016 - 10:00 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Jefferson, Ohio on Saturday, October 15, 2016 - 06:55 am:

Now don't upset your Mother when she gets in the car! Your going to visit your Grandmother if you want to or not! You can play ball with your friends anytime! Do you understand me!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wells, Hamilton Ontario on Saturday, October 15, 2016 - 08:59 am:

Early '17 car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Saturday, October 15, 2016 - 09:07 am:

Probly right Dennis! Definitely some tension there.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Brian Eliason...........Whittier, CA on Saturday, October 15, 2016 - 11:35 am:

One day, m' boy, all this could be yours!

(Full sarcasm mode) Gee, thanks Dad.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dean Kiefer - Adams, MN on Saturday, October 15, 2016 - 11:40 am:

The boy looks like he was in a fight? Looks like he has bloody nose?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Saturday, October 15, 2016 - 11:45 am:

Nah! The boy is just unhappy because he has to wear a suit. Someday when he grows up he will dress casual like everyone in our generation does. Suits are for very formal occasions such as open casket.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dallas landers on Saturday, October 15, 2016 - 05:12 pm:

No !!! I didn't take the car out driving in the mud while you were at work. The gas must have evaporated out of tank!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Lloid on Saturday, October 15, 2016 - 11:19 pm:

Great pic...Tim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Sunday, October 16, 2016 - 01:04 am:

Love the Victorian details on the house. Even the privy got accent color on the corner boards.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham on Sunday, October 16, 2016 - 11:08 am:

Burger, that was pure function. White corners on outbuildings helps you find 'em in the dark !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Sunday, October 16, 2016 - 12:18 pm:

When I began digging old outhouses for bottles, I was amazed at the amount of
"science" that went in to locating them. Things we might never think of, yet once
the mind gets going on the subject, seem all too obvious .....

1. Prevailing wind direction. No one wants that thing located upwind from the house.

2. Privacy. Not only from a perspective of modesty, but apparently neighborhood
hoodlums and rascals often liked to torment the user with rocks tossed at the privy
or going to far as to tip it over while in use.

3. Distance. Not so far from the house as to make it a real hike when one needed to
use it, but also not so close as to not let the prevailing wind disperse its loveliness.

4. Kind of an extension of number 3. Many stories survive of wires and ropes tied
between the house and privy to help the user find the latter (and their way back) in
blizzards and other bad weather situations.

=====================================

I cannot think of a single soul who wakes up in the morning, dreaming of being on
the working end of a shovel. So, FINDING where the outhouse was in 1880 with a
minimum of digging is always a paramount concern. It seems the builders of these
facilities shared this outlook and also took the least amount of digging path when
setting one up. Some times this meant shallow pits (in rocky soil or areas with shallow
bedrock. These privies got moved a lot more often. In soft soil, many times the pits
were amazingly deep ! The record for me so far is 32 feet ! Dig it once, never think
about it again in your lifetime.

a 5th consideration was the location of the well, or perhaps that one runs vice-versa
to locating the privy.

=====================================

Much like driving a Model T era vehicle, digging outhouses brings out the most
amazing people and experiences. Going out digging outhouses WITH a TT is not
only twice as likely to open gates to doing so, but it doubles the experience by
drawing all the right people out to see what is going on.

Lots of hard work and sore muscles, but I always come home feeling re-energized
and thrilled from all the stories and things we see.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Sunday, October 16, 2016 - 06:44 pm:

Burger, Your posting about the "science" of outhouse location reminded me of a song from long ago. I have a collectors LP (remember those?) of songs recorded by an early country western singer (may have been Vernon Dalhart, but I am not sure). One of the songs on it was "The Specialist", about a contractor that specialized in the building of outhouses! A great little piece of Americana. I spent a little time already looking for a link to it, but so far, I have not found one.
I remember several lines in the song. He tells of not building under the apple tree because you "don't want falling apples a knockin' on the roof". Another is when he asks if "you want the door a swingin' in? Or a swingin' out?" Followed by the suggestion that "a swingin' in" is better because if you are inside taking care of business and someone else starts walking up the path "you can just kick 'er shut!"
a fantastic little piece. I wish I could listen to the whole thing right now. But it, like way too much of my favorite stuff, is packed away.
I better stop thinking about it. Maybe someone can find a link.
Thank you, all.
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dallas landers on Sunday, October 16, 2016 - 07:08 pm:

Burger
I have had that experience of digging the hole. We needed a new out house and my parents had no money for materials. My dad worked at the saw mill and he brought home slab wood to build it . I straightened used nails and we had everything we needed . Hinges from old out house. The whole thing is about 5ft x 5ft and 7 ft tall. Why he made it a two holer I have no idea. It's not a chore one wants to share. But the hole is 3x4 x6ft deep or at least 40 yrs ago it was. The little shack on the hill is still there. I remember digging that hole with dad and my uncle . It was sand so not so much effort.
Who new we were Eco friendly? Reclaimed nails and hardware . Wood that would have been burned or ground to chips . It was all natural going into the earth and we didn't even treat it 1st.
We were not allowed to throw bottles or cans in as to not fill it up. The little shack weighed to much to have to move.
Don't dig there because you will find some boring sh?t


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Monday, October 17, 2016 - 04:58 am:

GOT IT! It wasn't Vernon Dalhart. It was Frank Crumit.
Found it on Youtube, and am listening to it for the second time in several minutes.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=njPjU0s1w3A

A really good piece of music.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Monday, October 17, 2016 - 12:32 pm:

The house above was built by a man whose name I have forgotten, but neighbors told an
interesting story. Apparently he was quite proud of having voted for Lincoln, and told any
and all comers about it. He also never moved up to automobile ownership, and well past
the time when most people owned a car, he still took his horse and buggy into town (Davenport)
to take car of his in-town business.

The house never had electricity, but DID have an acetylene light system piped throughout,
with a "cooker" out in a shed beyond the kitchen.

I often muse about people like this and what we've become as a nation and culture. Most
people today think it was Patrick Henry who said "Give me convenience, or give me death !"


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