Flat tire

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Flat tire
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tommy coffey on Sunday, October 16, 2016 - 12:47 pm:

My "new" '21 Touring has new tires on it, but the right front won't hold air. It has non-demountable rims. I guess I get to manually break down a tire and patch or replace a tube. At least the tire is new and should be soft and flexible. Any tips before I start? Thanks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Sunday, October 16, 2016 - 12:50 pm:

Try the easy thing first. Check that the valve insert is tight inside the stem. Tighten it with one of these tools, or the metal valve cap that has the tool as part of it:

tool


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Schubert on Sunday, October 16, 2016 - 01:43 pm:

Tommy
A easy test for the problem Mark is talking about is;
Put some "spit" over the end. It should just sit there!!
If it bubbles/ bulges or won't even stay there then you know that is the problem. Don't over tightening, just snug. New valve cores are cheap to buy and a tiny speck of dirt will cause problems
As you have clinchers, you only need to pry off one side. A old tapered spring leaf works great. Start about a couple inches from the valve stem and work away from it. Once you are half way around it should just pull off.
Probably you know all this already
Best of luck avoiding pinching the tube


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tommy coffey on Sunday, October 16, 2016 - 11:58 pm:

No the problem is not in the valve. The tube must have a hole in it. The tire is new so I suppose the tube is also, but I don't know for sure,yet. If I inflate the tire air comes out around the bottom of the stem. I'm trying to decide whether to take the wheel off and take it to the local tire store or attempt the repair myself. I have patched tubes before because I am into bicycles and garden tractors. I might try it myself because I figure at least it's here at home, while next time I might be out on the road somewhere. Then I will know what to expect. I only have a pair of tire tools made for motorcycle tires. I don't know if they will be enough leverage for the T tire.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Corey Walker, Brownsboro TX on Monday, October 17, 2016 - 01:08 am:

I took a wheel to a tire shop once cause I didn't feel like messing with it and they told me I'd have to take the tire off because they didn't know how. I just use 2 flathead screwdrivers, I don't even have a tire tool. No problem.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tommy coffey on Monday, October 17, 2016 - 01:20 am:

I tried using screwdrivers years ago on dirt bikes. That's why I bought the tire tools.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Monday, October 17, 2016 - 03:19 am:

A warm clincher is easier to change than a cold one. Lay it out in the sun to heat up before you work on it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Monday, October 17, 2016 - 04:24 am:

Might as well get used to them now! The first time or two with clinchers, can waste half a day (or more?). Get good at them? On the side of the road? Some people can take one apart and put it together in about twenty minutes. With the experience you have mentioned? You should be able to adjust to them quickly.

The biggest problem these days? Seems to be that patches aren't always sticking well to tubes. I don't know if it is EPA,? Or manufacturers? The tubes? Or the patches? Or the glue? But I used to never have trouble with patches holding really well (started patching bicycle tubes 55 years ago). I now have about a half dozen T tubes with leaks I have patched repeatedly, and still pull off.
Good luck!
Drive carefully, and enjoy,W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Monday, October 17, 2016 - 06:43 am:

Wayne is correct, some or most of the modern tubes are made from a thick silicone rubber that you cannot patch because nothing sticks to it. It makes for a good durable tube but can't be patched. So you have to carry a spare tube.

Natural rubber tubes are typically thinner and hold patches well.

The easy way to change any clincher tire is with the wheel mounted to the car. Get yourself a milk stool and a couple tire irons.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Willis Jenkins on Monday, October 17, 2016 - 08:10 am:

I have been repairing tires & tubes for over 33 years now. I have done just about every size tire and tube out there, except earth movers. On a tube, unlike a tire, it is not necessary to roughen up the tube. A cleaner is used to thoroughly clean the area to be patched. Then the glue is applied. The glue needs to dry for about 15 minutes so it looks dull looking. The patch is then applied and a patch roller is run over it in all directions real good. There is no need to clamp the patch. Also, no need to pull off the top clear plastic that the patch is attached to. It doesn't harm anything leaving it on and will only weaken the patch bond by pulling it off. Now, it is most important to use all the products (cleaner, glue and patch) from the same company! Do not use products from different manufacturers! Companies make their products to work together for a strong bond. If you follow these steps you will not have a problem.
Hope this was of help,
Willis


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Brough on Monday, October 17, 2016 - 11:01 am:

Harbor Freight sells the tire spoons. I borrowed a set from a friend and took 5 tires off wire wheels yesterday in about 45 minutes. I tried the screwdrivers and had troble getting a grip on one bead of the tire to get it started. The spoons have enough of a bend to them to make it easy.

Got new tires and tubes on order and will try the plastic garbage bag technique when they arrive. Pinching a tube with a sharp screwdriver is a $25 and week long wait mistake.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham on Monday, October 17, 2016 - 11:17 am:

Robert - "plastic garbage bag technique" ?!? Please explain ! Thanks


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Monday, October 17, 2016 - 11:19 am:

If you decide to replace the inner tube, you'll want one that identical to the unit you're taking out of service. -In that case, I would phone Lang's and order the best quality inner-tube they have in your type.

If you decide the existing inner-tube should be patched and you've never patched one before, you'd be better off to take the tube to your local bicycle shop and have them patch it. -That chore is something they do all day long, every day of the week, so chances are very much in favor of them doing it correctly. -It's the easy, reliable way to make this problem go away.

As for peeling tires off the rim and re-mounting... well, that's pretty much a rite of passage for every Model T owner. -Here's what I've learned by doing:

First, you need the right tools. -These include corn starch (because breathing talcum powder is unhealthy), two or three giant C-clamps, a pair of short tire irons, a big, heavy, dead-blow, rubber mallet, an electric tire pump and the sun.

I've heard horror stories of old, hardened clinchers (particularly Ward's Riversides) that were so stubborn to remove, they had to be sawn off. -I've had to peel off old Riversides too and yes, they were hard as oak, but Archimedes knew a thing or two about leverage and screws, and the principle works beautifully in the form of two or three big ol' C-clamps.



They're geared down low enough that you'll only get a 16th of an inch of movement per half-twist, but brother, their mechanical advantage is irresistible. -The bead will break.

There once was a kind, elderly couple who manufactured and marketed their own design of tire irons especially for the Ford Model T.



Unfortunately, the phone number they had stamped into their irons no longer goes through, so I suppose the best that can be done now is to try to find a set of irons that approximates their shape and size. -They measure out at 9 7/8".

If the tire irons you purchase have any square corners or are anything but dead smooth, take a file and then some emery cloth to them.

While we're talking abrasives; do make sure your rim is smooth, with no sharp edges anywhere. - When my tires came off the first time, the inside of the rims were a rusty mess. -They needed the rust wire-brushed off, emery papered, primed and painted. -I also applied two layers of duct-tape to the inside of the rim. -Some folks look askance at using duct-tape that way, but it's a time-tested way of doing this.

The name of this game is don't puncture the inner-tube, and the more you use the rubber mallet and C-clamps instead of the tire irons, the fewer opportunities there will be for puncturing your inner-tube.

Prep-work includes letting your replacement tire sit in the hot sun long enough to soften the rubber, and lubing up the inner-tube and tire clinchers with corn starch. -Some folks use dishwashing liquid as a lubricant, but that's horribly messy. -I'd much rather sweep up corn starch than mop up dishwashing soap. It's easiest to reinstall a tube that is slightly inflated. -You only want enough air in there to take out the limpness and just barely give it shape.

I found it easy to mount and dismount tires on the front of the car, but not the rear, so when dealing with a rear tire, I take the wheel off the car (With pre-1915 Model T's, this may be less of a problem because the fender doesn't wrap around the back). -If you're going to take the back wheel off the car, you're obviously going to need a wheel-puller (and every Model T owner should have one). -The new Model T wheel-pullers made overseas are not very good, so try to get an old, made-in USA puller. -If your wheel has a Rocky Mountain brake drum, getting the wheel back on the car can be a bit of a challenge, but if you have a friend there to maneuver the brake band around the drum while you're pushing the wheel back onto the axle, it's very straightforward.

Flaps are great if you have the patience and room in the tire to accommodate them. -When mounting Firestone NON-SKIDs up front, I made an attempt at squeezing a flap in there, but came to the conclusion that there just wasn't sufficient room in the tire. -All four of my tires ran just fine without flaps until they wore out. -Some guys swear by flaps and insist they're necessary, others insist they're not. -I'm sort of in the middle ground where that's concerned. -If you can manage to wrestle flaps into your tires and get the whole shebang mounted that way; great. -If not...well, Ford never bothered with 'em and I guess it worked out okay.

Inflation is important, particularly with rear tires because they are subjected to the kind of acceleration and braking forces that can cause a loose tire and tube to slip on the rim and shear off the air valve. -Minimum inflation is 55 psi for front clinchers and 60 for rears.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Monday, October 17, 2016 - 11:27 am:

My favorite tire iron is the TT tire irons. The tool kit tire irons are almost worthless.


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