Terminal Block Wire Connectors

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Terminal Block Wire Connectors
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Sunday, October 16, 2016 - 01:49 pm:

Several years ago, I bought a very nice '27 depot hack that I consider a pretty nice amateur restoration. I need to do some work on the electrical wiring, and altho' I like to keep things pretty much "original", I'm not adverse to modifying the electrical connections to the terminal block in such a way as to afford convenience in the event that at some future time, it becomes necessary to disconnect wires one at a time in order to locate a "short circuit" or something.

What the fellow that originally restored/rebuilt the car did was to install a terminal block that had individual fuses for each and every circuit. Forum guys that read the forum regularly will recall that John Regan of "Fun Projects, Inc." discourages this "individual fuse for every circuit" practice and regards this as "just one more opportunity for electrical problems". I now agree fully as this has indeed become a problem for me. I now have problems with loose connections at this "fuse block" that are a really irritating! Here's what I plan to do:

First, I have ordered (thru" Lang's) a new, original type terminal block and a Fun Projects, Inc. 25W in-line fuse and fuse holder which I'll install in the main wire that connects the terminal block to the battery. My wiring is in very good condition and does not need replacing, however, I plan on installing new connectors on all wires (input & output) that connect to the terminal block.

My question is, should I use ring-type connectors on each "input" wire, and the more easily-to-disconnect spade-type connectors on each "output" wire???

My thought here is that if & when it becomes necessary to disconnect output wires from the terminal block for testing circuits for a "short circuit" or something, I could just individually loosen each screw a bit to disconnect a circuit by just sliding the output wire spade connector off but leaving the "input" wire with the ring-type connectors in place.

Does this make sense? Or is there a better way?

Hoping for suggestions from those that know the best way,......thanks,......harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Sunday, October 16, 2016 - 02:22 pm:

Sounds fine to me, Harold. That's what I did, except I used spades on all the wires. I also ditched the cheesy blue plastic insulators and used shrink tubing. This car is for go, not show, so it doesn't have to be "correct" down to the last detail, but I think the rubber insulators look a lot closer to period correct than the plastic ones.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry Davis Houston TX on Sunday, October 16, 2016 - 02:32 pm:

There is no "best way" Ring or slip., they both have advantages and dis advantages. T vibrations will eventually loosen those contact screws to the point that either the screw falls out and the loom traces go everywhere or the screw just loosens to the point that if you catch it on time,your OK. If you feel the need to take traces off from time to time, slip makes it easier. Slip also makes it easier to complete contacts as there is no need to completely remove the screw where as for ring contacts you have to remove the screw. I prefer the slip as I've lost so many of those tiny screws taking them out and with butterfingers trying to get them back in place. But, it's really what works for you.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Sunday, October 16, 2016 - 03:10 pm:

Steve & Jerry - Thanks a bunch! Tells me I'm basically "in the ballpark" with my thinking anyway! Electrical stuff is just,..."not my thing", to say the least!

One more question,...the previous owner/builder (long deceased by the way) also installed a number of accessories on this depot hack, so there are additional wires that also connect to the terminal block. Should I just attach them with spade connectors too, or, is there a better way to do this? Hate to complicate the original wiring with additional wires, but,.... it is what it is I guess,.... thanks again, and any additional suggestions would be very welcome,......harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Zibell, Huntsville, AL on Sunday, October 16, 2016 - 05:54 pm:

The reproduction harnesses I installed had spade connectors for the fire wall block. So I'd say your choice. Also the reproduction rubber terminal blocks use machine thread type screws into a threaded insert. More reliable that the wood screws originally used.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George Mills_Cherry Hill NJ on Sunday, October 16, 2016 - 06:06 pm:

One trick when done is to ask the missus if she has a bottle of clear nail polish to lend you.

Dab a bit at every screw head to connector to term block.

End of shake loosening yet the minute you actually twist it, it will let go.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Dufault on Sunday, October 16, 2016 - 06:46 pm:

Harold,

You wrote: ...and a Fun Projects, Inc. 25W in-line fuse and fuse holder which I'll install in the main wire that connects the terminal block to the battery.

John's directions say to put that fuse in a different location...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron Patterson-Nicholasville, Kentucky on Sunday, October 16, 2016 - 07:09 pm:

1
Here is what FunProjects recommends.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron Patterson-Nicholasville, Kentucky on Sunday, October 16, 2016 - 07:11 pm:

Perhaps this is what Harold was trying to say?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Sunday, October 16, 2016 - 09:09 pm:

Thanks Ron,....yes,....as I understand it, the yellow wire that connects to the "hot" side of the starter switch is the source of battery power to the terminal block, via the ammeter and ignition switch. So you cut the yellow wire as close as possible to the starter switch (taking into account, easy access to fuse holder thru' battery access cover) and you insert the 25W in-line fuse in the yellow wire there. (I think....???)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry Davis Houston TX on Sunday, October 16, 2016 - 09:32 pm:

Spade......


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Sunday, October 16, 2016 - 09:50 pm:

Oh no! Another spade vs ring discussion.
There is a big difference between period exact and what works best.
First - they both work!
Second - do what floats your boat?
Third - what is easiest for YOU?

I don't care about exact.
All i care about is what works best so I use spade because it is easier to remove/add wires.

They both make firm electrical connections.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Monday, October 17, 2016 - 01:23 am:

Spade? A spade has a single wide blade. Do you folks use this term to describe a fork terminal? A spade connector to me is the flat thing the modern connectors slide onto.
Ain't English grand.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Monday, October 17, 2016 - 02:20 am:

Allan - You have raised an interesting point. I may have used an incorrect term, however, after some internet "research", several sites that I brought up use the term "spade" for the fork-shaped terminal I'm talking about. However, some sites also use the term "forked" terminal. Very confusing, however, it is the "fork shaped" type of connector that I am talking about when I used the term "spade"! Hmmm,....confusing indeed.

At any rate, thanks to all for the suggestions and information and I think the single most beneficial thing that I'm now considering is the fact that the ring type terminal would certainly be harder to use and would indeed provide a very good chance for my big fat fingers to drop the screw due to the necessity of having to completely remove the screw instead of just loosening it for removal of the fork-shaped terminal connector,....whatever it's properly called.

Thanks again to all for the info and suggestions,....what a great resource this forum is,......harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Brough on Monday, October 17, 2016 - 03:17 pm:

Sounds like it's just a matter of choice. For me, as odd as it sounds, I'd rather use the ring terminals
I do most of my restoration by feel, not by sight and having to hold in one fork terminal with one hand, the other fork terminal with the other hand and tightening the screw with the screwdriver in my teeth is not fun.
Yes, putting the two ring terminal ends through the little screw and getting it started is a PITA, but I can do that with one hand and turn the screwdriver with the other.
And, if my terminal block screw is a little loose while I'm picking up the dropped screwdriver, the wire ends don't come popping out and I get to start all over again.

To each his own.


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