How to remove rust from a T engine before painting

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: How to remove rust from a T engine before painting
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron MacDonald on Sunday, October 16, 2016 - 04:12 pm:

I have a perfectly good, but rusty, 1917 T engine going into my Livingood 4wd this winter. The engine is typically Ford brown. Looking for suggestions on rust removal. If the engine needed a rebuild that would be easy, but it doesn't. There must be some magic salve that I've not found that will make this tedious job a bit easier. Any/all suggestions welcomed.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Landry, Hudson, NH on Sunday, October 16, 2016 - 05:22 pm:

http://www.por15.com/POR-15-Engine-Painting-Kit_p_49.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Schubert on Sunday, October 16, 2016 - 08:42 pm:

I've never worried about it!!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Monday, October 17, 2016 - 07:04 am:

I use one of these from Harbor Freight:


With various sizes of these:


Makes quick work of surface rust. Wear a dust mask and some goggles or a face shield of course.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron MacDonald on Monday, October 17, 2016 - 07:49 am:

Thanks for the input. I've got the IR equivalent of the CP. I hate dust but I guess I already knew the answer to the question. Tks again. Mac


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chad Marchees _____Tax Capital, NY on Monday, October 17, 2016 - 12:23 pm:

Only other method is chemical. You can try Evaporator or Oshpro I think is the name, or some of the "rust converters" that turn the rust into a black paintable phosphate coating.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Landry, Hudson, NH on Monday, October 17, 2016 - 04:12 pm:

Brush it lightly to get off the real loose stuff. Don't sweat all the little nooks and crannies. Use the POR-15 process. Not inexpensive, but pretty amazing stuff.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By HARRY A DAW Troy, Mo. on Monday, October 17, 2016 - 07:54 pm:

If you Google rust remover, there are numerous chemical solutions shown that are suppose to remove rust. Some might have to be neutralized before painting. If I were doing it, I would get the loose off, prime it with a good rust primer like Rustolium, then paint it with a top coat of Rustolium the color I wanted.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tim moore, "Island City" MI on Monday, October 17, 2016 - 07:56 pm:

Like Royce I use wire wheels and use them on most things. I DO NOT wear gloves as I don't want a wire wheel grabbing them. Hang on because a wire wheel can grab your un-tucked shirt tail like a wild cat. Always wear safety glasses and keep the spit line away from your face.

Years ago I posted about a friend who was running a wire wheel. He had a bristle break off and shoot right up his nostril. It knocked him right out like he got hit by Mike Tyson.

A wire wheel does it quick and dirty but is like holding onto a wildcat that wants to scratch and bite you and once it get hold of you you can't get it off in time. You can't throw it off when it is climbing up your shirt!

Tim Moore


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chad Marchees _____Tax Capital, NY on Monday, October 17, 2016 - 08:00 pm:

Oh my god Tim, I am on the floor laughing at your last statement. Thanks for the entertainment.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick in Florida on Monday, October 17, 2016 - 08:46 pm:

I took my Model T block to an engine rebuilding shop and had them clean it. They put it into a cabinet where it underwent a cleaning process and when it came out, every bit of rust and grease inside and out was removed and it looked brand new. Just be sure to remind them about the babbit so they don't use an aggressive thermal cleaning process that might melt the babbit. A lot of young mechanics have never seen a Model T engine or babbited bearings so they need to be told. Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Tuesday, October 18, 2016 - 12:23 am:

Ron, I would go with a rust converter or a "Paint over Rust" product. It will last a long time and get in to all the nooks and crannies typical on an engine.
Jim, engine is together, he doesn't want to take it apart, otherwise your idea is good.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick in Florida on Tuesday, October 18, 2016 - 01:44 pm:

Thanks David. As usual, I missed part of his post. I need to retake my Evelyn Wood speed reading course. I'm getting rusty :-). Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Tuesday, October 18, 2016 - 05:15 pm:

Jim, Hey, it happens!!
You're getting rusty? Well, this thread is about removing rust!!
Heh Heh Heh!
I couldn't resist. I know, I should, but gee, the door was open. ..
Reminds me of the kid who was told to never go near the storm celler doors. One day the wind blew them open, and he couldn't resist. He looked through the doors and saw SKY!! TREES!! SUNLIGHT!!!
:-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Lloid on Tuesday, October 18, 2016 - 08:16 pm:

I am gonna try the por 15 kit on my old model A sedan. No leaks but engine is rusty and crusty. Would like to see how it works.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick in Florida on Wednesday, October 19, 2016 - 02:01 am:

Thanks David. My middle name is Russell and, as a kid, my nickname was, you guessed it..."Rusty". LOL! Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chad Marchees _____Tax Capital, NY on Wednesday, October 19, 2016 - 06:23 am:

Tim (and others), if you never have used POR15, USE GLOVES!!! It will not come off you no matter how hard you scrub. As a matter of fact, wear old clothes too. Takes approximately 2 weeks to get it off your skin.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Landry, Hudson, NH on Wednesday, October 19, 2016 - 09:01 am:

Good point Chad. There is NOTHING that will take it off your skin once it has dried. I picked some POR-15 up at an auto parts store a couple of years ago. The salesman made sure I understood how permanent it is. He had another customer that didn't understand that and had sprayed it without a face shield. He came in the next day covered in black speckles demanding something to get it off. Sorry!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Wednesday, October 19, 2016 - 01:33 pm:

Jim,
I used to do a cartoon for the Steamboat News, the character was Russ T. Pipe. I got a note from a Rusty Piper once! It was fun at first coming up with funny situations--but then it got harder; I have great respect for successful cartoon writers as it's not easy being funny on a continuing basis! Most of the ones I did were based on things that really happened when I was around the small steamboat community.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mario Brossard on Wednesday, October 19, 2016 - 02:11 pm:

Agree with Chad. There is NOTHING that will take it off your skin once it has dried. I used several times POR-15 and work really well but be sure you remove all grease and most rust possible before applying. Use tools like Royce suggested before painting. Clean surface is the best advice. You will have this kind of result. Sorry the picture is upside down.

Cheers,

Mario


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Wednesday, October 19, 2016 - 03:17 pm:

Egads, you can see right through the engine pan and hogshead!! Inviso-paint!
:-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By ALAN FAIRCLOUGH from Houston, TEXAS on Wednesday, October 19, 2016 - 05:36 pm:

Devoe coatings makes a great product that is an epoxi two part pre-prime.
They haul ships out and let the hull dry, they do not scrape off the rust. They paint it with the pre-prime. It is a two part product. The main one gallon can is 3/4 full.
You pour in the contents of the quart size catalyst can and stir. It goes from molasses thick to the viscosity of kerosene. You spray, bush, splash it on. It penetrates the rust, wicks through to the base metal, drips for a day and then sets like a gel. It hardens after four days and now you can sand it, drill it, paint it and the rust just becomes the solids of the primer.
I have soaked cork floats in it, I have soaked insect eaten wood in it, I have mixed it with sawdust to make fillers, I have used it with brick, mixed it with tungsten carbide granules to make non-skid surfaces. ( they use this for landing strips on aircraft carriers). It is permanent.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron MacDonald on Friday, October 21, 2016 - 06:19 pm:

As is always the case the threads make a good read and offer the best in advice. Greatly appreciated
II am going to go the route of grinding, sanding getting dusty and using colourful language on my engine I guess. I suspected that in the first instance but hoped for a miracle cure.
Re your input Alan; is the product you refer to called "coal-tar epoxy"?? I helped a friend undercoat a Sunbeam Tiger restoration with Coal Tar epoxy years ago. Toughest paint I ever saw.We painted a scrap piece of sheet metal, let it cure and beat it into a hundred different shapes without breaking the paint coat.


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