Correct hardware for mounting items on wooden firewall

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Correct hardware for mounting items on wooden firewall
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Brough on Monday, October 17, 2016 - 09:03 am:

Creating a WWI military vehicle using a 1915 frame and fenders and hood with a wooden open express bype body. I've got the wooden firewall and need to mount cowl lights, horn, coil box, and maybe an additional accessory or two.

The mounting brackets for my cowl lights are not squared off, so the mounting bolts must be "normal" bolts and not carriage bolts. Was everything that used a nut and bolt a castle nut and split pin type?

On carriage bolts, were the round head mounted from the passenger side with the nuts on the outside for appearance and safety? Of the other way around. Some bolts heads will be under the hood and some, like the carriage lights and horn will not and can be seen from the hood side of the firewall.

What do you recommend?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Monday, October 17, 2016 - 09:22 am:

I would imagine that the bolts that could have been used would have been stove bolts. In other words nuts that were square and bolt heads that were square.

Most of the remains of old farm machinery and mechanical equipment used square headed nut and bolts in that era. Not all but the majority.

Whichever side the square hole was on would be the side that the bolt carriage bolt would go through I would think if it was going through a metal bracket that had a square hole.

If it had to go through the outside of the car it would go through the outside for appearance. Maybe a purist would know for sure.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Brough on Monday, October 17, 2016 - 10:55 am:

One of the reases I ask is that on my WWII trailer, I noticed that the hardware for attaching reflectors, hand brake, etc. that went through the tub was "backwards" to me. Then it was pointed out that you didn't want things inside the trailer to get snagged, so all the screw and bolt heads came from inside the trailer and all the nuts were on the outside.

If you were sitting inside the T, you might want bolt heads on the inside and the nuts on the outside, but, I agree, the appearance is not flattering.

On my carriage light bracket, the nut holding the lamp to the bracket is a castle nut, so having two mosre castle nuts coming through from the inside of the firewall to the outside would have three castle nuts and split pins in the same general area, whoich would not be too bad.

It's basically a depot hack type firewall.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Monday, October 17, 2016 - 11:27 pm:

Robert, a carpenter's rule of thumb is the bolt head with the square under it goes to the woodwork. The square pulls into the wood to keep the bolt from turning. The nut usually goes against the metal. So on a pickup bed, bolt heads would be inside the bed, and the nuts would be against the ironwork on the outside. Not the neatest look, but the most practical.

Hope this helps.
Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Brough on Tuesday, October 18, 2016 - 09:03 pm:

Makes sense. While I was drilling my holes and tril fitting, I put the carriage head on the inside bare wood and the nut on the carriage lamp bracket. Yes, the bolt head bit into the wood as I tightened and it made for a good, tight fit.
I'm presuming this is the way I will go and keep all the bolt heads inside the cab and the nuts on the outside or under the hood.


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