Route 66 in St Louis

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Route 66 in St Louis
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Monday, October 17, 2016 - 10:21 pm:

My son Nicholas sent this link to me. I thought it would be of interest here.

https://vanishingstl.blogspot.com/2016/10/route-66-changing-courses-landscapes.h tml

Herb


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Everett on Tuesday, October 18, 2016 - 07:29 am:

That was excellent, Herb.

Please thank your son for sending it to you.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Erman on Tuesday, October 18, 2016 - 08:08 am:

The big thing that is missing is a small roadside frozen custard stand called Ted Drews. If you are on Rt 66 in St. Louis you owe it to yourself to head out to Chippewa, near Jamieson and River Des Peres for a frozen concrete. I get to St. Louis once a year to visit the wife's family, Ted Drews and Imo's pizza are mandatory stops.

You can thank me later...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Tuesday, October 18, 2016 - 05:20 pm:

"frozen concrete" Is that a winter-time treat??
Don'tcha just love "auto-correct?"


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Lodge - St Louis MO on Tuesday, October 18, 2016 - 06:00 pm:

Not auto-correct in this case:

"Throughout the years, Ted Drewes Frozen Custard has become a popular treat for St. Louisans and tourists to enjoy after visiting the Arch, the Fox and Muny Theaters, the St. Louis Zoo, or a Cardinal’s baseball game. Along with the delicious hot fudge sundae, Ted’s “concrete” has been the most popular treat at the custard stands. The concrete, which was created in 1959, is a malt or shake so thick that it is served upside down."

http://teddrewes.com/


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Tuesday, October 18, 2016 - 09:34 pm:

OOOHHHH Chocolate Malt--YESSS, I'll take that "concrete" anytime!!! If I ever get back that way again, It's on my "bucket list."


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Freighter Jim on Wednesday, October 19, 2016 - 01:27 am:

David & Drew are both correct ...

The MoDOT uses the recipe for asphalt & concrete repair ...


Freighter Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Blake, Kansas City on Wednesday, October 19, 2016 - 08:39 am:

Yes, Ted Drews is a must see for the Route 66 enthusiast.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George John Drobnock on Wednesday, October 19, 2016 - 09:59 am:

Interesting how Route 66 has become the most noted passage west. Maybe it was because by the time 66 was finished the automobile of the day was better suited for long distance touring.

But we should not forget the others that were used by automobile tourist before 66 became a popular brand. It all began in 1913 with the Lincoln Highway Association. A promotion to plan and promote and sign a highway suitable for automobiles using existing roads from Times Square in New York City to San Francisco, California.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Auto_trail


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rick J. Gunter -- Sparta, Missouri, USA on Wednesday, October 19, 2016 - 10:50 am:

The Missouri History Museum in St. Louis currently has a special exhibit "Route 66, Main Street Through St. Louis" that runs now through July 16, 2017:

http://mohistory.org/route66

The museum has also produced a new documentary film about Route 66 in Missouri that will be available on DVD soon: "SHOW ME 66, Main Street Through Missouri." See the film trailer at:

http://mohistory.org/node/58204?ctx=/route66/


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Thursday, October 20, 2016 - 04:25 am:

In the mid 50's when I was about 6 or 7 years old, my parents and I went from NW MO. down to route 66 and traveled to New Mexico a couple of times to visit family. I have some pictures from then and a lot of memories. Wonderful times. Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rick J. Gunter -- Sparta, Missouri, USA on Thursday, October 20, 2016 - 09:45 am:

I have driven a lot of the remaining sections of Route 66 through Missouri, Kansas, and Oklahoma. More of the original road disappears each year. In some places, it is the original pavement of old 66 that you drive on. In other sections, the entire road has been rebuilt. It runs the same course but it is now newer, wider, with better ditches, new bridges, and has been straightened in a few places.

I remember back in the 1960-70’s, there were a lot of old buildings still standing: motels, gas stations, restaurants, and old tourist traps. Back in 1977 there was a group of people that was trying to get the US Congress to designate portions of the route as a national park. It is amazing what could have been preserved at that time. However, it was never even considered. Folks in Congress thought it was just a collection of hopeless derelict buildings and an old dangerous road.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Thursday, October 20, 2016 - 10:07 am:

The Lincoln Highway through Salt Lake City was changed about the same number of times.


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