Peening vs Staking on rear hub nuts.

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Peening vs Staking on rear hub nuts.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charles Weisgerber- Vancouver WA. on Monday, October 17, 2016 - 11:00 pm:

What are some opinions on staking vs peening of the rear hub nuts. I noticed that my peened rear hub bolt-nuts were loose by about 3/4 turn. The bolts were peened over pretty good but it still allowed the nut to loosen a bit over time. Some of this could have been due to spoke shrinkage. The wheel needs new spokes, so the bolts and nuts will be replaced. Once the hub bolts are tightened, would it be better to grind the bolts flush with the nuts then stake the nut in a few places across the threads? This may provide a better way of locking the nut. Thoughts? comments?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Tuesday, October 18, 2016 - 10:15 am:

Properly staked nuts won't move. They can't. That's the purpose of staking to begin with. Peening, in my opinion kind of makes a mess and unless the bolt end is pounded solidly onto the nut you might get loosening because there's no contact. Won't happen with staking where it's all visible. If you can tighten a properly installed/staked nut & bolt you've got what George Costanza used to call shrinkage.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charles Weisgerber- Vancouver WA. on Tuesday, October 18, 2016 - 11:28 pm:

Thanks Charlie, I think I'll stake them.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Wednesday, October 19, 2016 - 06:29 am:

The new bolts from the vendors are a bit longer than required, which in my opinion is good because they would be useless if they were too short. They need to be peened while holding a heavy weight (bucking bar) against the head of the bolt, thus expanding the diameter of the bolt, not just folding the ends over the nut, which loosens the bolt.

Staking is not as good, and it doesn't look right either in my opinion.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Wednesday, October 19, 2016 - 06:59 am:

I prefer to peen the bolts, especially on new wheels. As timber may shrink a little, peened bolts can be tightened a bit more and re-peened.

Hope this helps.
Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Wednesday, October 19, 2016 - 08:55 am:

To each his own I guess but the bolts/nuts can, in some cases, interfere with the emerg. shoes. I like to keep them as short as possible on the inside to avoid this. Plus they can be removed if needed without having to cut off the peened end first. I don't think this has any thing to do with what HF might have done way back when since it's not visible. Again: totally your choice.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chad Marchees _____Tax Capital, NY on Wednesday, October 19, 2016 - 04:38 pm:

I gotta ask because, well, I just don't know. Can't you just use Loctite? At least with blue you can reapply and retighten if necessary.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Wednesday, October 19, 2016 - 05:09 pm:

I guess Locktite would work. Never tried it. Cutting them close to the nut as explained above can save head aches later but I'm still with staking.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Wednesday, October 19, 2016 - 06:22 pm:

Charlie B, you are right about the nuts sometimes interfering with the emergency brake shoes/springs. If they are the correct thinner than hardware shop nuts, I take this as a wear indicator like those on tyres. Only, in this case, it indicates that the axle/hub is worn, and it needs shimming.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By JohnH on Wednesday, October 19, 2016 - 06:27 pm:

I've used Nyloc nuts with loctite or contact cement for the last 14 years. Damaging threads on bolts doesn't seem to be a good thing to do in my opinion.


Add a Message


This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Username:  
Password:

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration