Boiling parts?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Boiling parts?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Thursday, October 20, 2016 - 11:17 am:

How much lye per gallon of water? How long?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Thursday, October 20, 2016 - 11:22 am:

Is this really necessary? Sorry. Had to ask.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Thursday, October 20, 2016 - 11:30 am:

The idea is to remove any trace of oil from transmission drums so body solder will adhere. Boiling in lye has replaced some environmentally unfriendly solvents.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Thursday, October 20, 2016 - 11:31 am:

Steve,

I've boiled parts in the past. I just put way too much Tide powdered laundry detergent in boiling water and let the parts soak for a while. Did an amazing job.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Thursday, October 20, 2016 - 11:34 am:

I'll add that this was done as a prep for welding also. Worked great. Also, I baked the parts at about 300F after the boiling and got even more deep seated oil out. (This was for welding cast aluminum parts, if that makes any difference.)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By R.V. Anderson on Thursday, October 20, 2016 - 11:38 am:

Boiling water or steam alone are pretty harsh chemicals. Adding detergent boosts both of them.

Years ago, before I was able to get all new copper for my rewound mags, I reduced my solvent use by 80% by boiling the old windings in a large open kettle with Cascade. (This worked well for quite awhile but I ended the practice after my father-in-law lifted the boiling kettle off the stove and dropped it on his foot. MAJOR burns, and I don't mean Frank.)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Semprez-Templeton, CA on Thursday, October 20, 2016 - 12:04 pm:

I prefer to soak parts in "Oil Eater", a product that can be purchased from many auto parts stores. It will emulsify the most stubborn grease and oil. Magic on rear end housings!!! It is non toxic and waterbased, much safer than hot lye!

After soak and rinsing parts must be dried or rusting will occur quickly.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Thursday, October 20, 2016 - 02:04 pm:

If you wash parts in lacquer thinner the parts will begin to rust before the day is over.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stephen, South Texas on Thursday, October 20, 2016 - 02:34 pm:

I would say about 1/2 cup per gallon should get you up above pH10. If you have a pH meter, try to get the solution up to at least pH11-12. Add the lye to the water slowly while mixing as it will create an exothermic reaction.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Hatch on Thursday, October 20, 2016 - 03:31 pm:

Good luck finding lye. I can not get it around here. It can not be sold, it is used to make meth. Dan


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Thursday, October 20, 2016 - 03:41 pm:

Amazon sells lye, and that's no lie.

https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_1/159-8194428-6485746?url=search-alias%3 Daps&field-keywords=lye


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Semprez-Templeton, CA on Thursday, October 20, 2016 - 08:17 pm:

I prefer to soak parts in "Oil Eater", a product that can be purchased from many auto parts stores. It will emulsify the most stubborn grease and oil. Magic on rear end housings!!! It is non toxic and waterbased, much safer than hot lye!

After soak and rinsing parts must be dried or rusting will occur quickly.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Thursday, October 20, 2016 - 08:21 pm:

Steve, the reason for your search raised alarm bells with me. After the bollocking I copped from my son, I am obliged to relate the following.
I was balancing the drums on the transmission for my roadster and a really nice drum was quite out of balance, so rather than try to balance it by grinding away at the webs/inside surface, I went part of the way like that and then added 50:50 solder to bring the drum into balance.

Fast forward to the first oil change after the National Rally of some 900km. There were bits of melted metal in the drain oil and numerous small round droplets in the cavity in the magnetic drain plug. More small balls turned up in the drain oil. I dropped the inspection pan and the trans cover screen and found nothing other than the usual magnetic fluff you would expect from a new build. All the bearings looked perfect.

A couple of days later it dawned on me that it was likely to be solder from the drums. We had one severely steep and long hill to descend on the rally. I had my low gear Kevlar band adjusted so that it would act just before the pedal bottoms out, so that it had maximum clearance. On that descent, in Ruckstel low and Ford low, the gradient was enough for the trans to slip with the pressure I was able to exert, and things got quite hot.There was no damage to the drums and the linings have held up, but it must have been enough to melt the solder. The melting metal formed neat round balls in the hot oil, much as lead shot is made by dropping molten metal into water.

At least, that is what I hope happened. The car runs fine, there is no trace of debris anywhere else in the motor, and the trans operates as expected. Needless to say I will be watching the drain oil closely next time it is changed.

Hope this helps.
Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Schwab on Thursday, October 20, 2016 - 08:25 pm:

Just curious... Where is body solder used on transmission drums?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Putnam, Bluffton, Ohio on Thursday, October 20, 2016 - 08:31 pm:

I routinely have all parts cleaned in a hot lye solution at a local shop. They use a commercial vat, heated to 175 degrees. When I asked how much lye do you put in it, I was told when it stops taking off the grease or gets slow we put in another shovel full! I suspect it becomes a saturated solution.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Putnam, Bluffton, Ohio on Thursday, October 20, 2016 - 08:33 pm:

I routinely have all parts cleaned in a hot lye solution at a local shop. They use a commercial vat, heated to 175 degrees. When I asked how much lye do you put in it, I was told when it stops taking off the grease or gets slow we put in another shovel full! I suspect it becomes a saturated solution.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Thursday, October 20, 2016 - 10:02 pm:

David, it goes like this.


Put the drum on a balancer to find the heavy side and the light side.


Apply body solder on the light side.


Grind off enough solder to achieve balance.


Check balance again. Check and grind, check and grind, until the drum can be turned to any position and won't move on its own.


This reverse drum is balanced with solder in two places.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Townsend ; ^ ) Gresham, Orygun on Thursday, October 20, 2016 - 11:24 pm:

I once cleaned a magneto field coil by running it through the dishwasher.

Um, just once. For the record, it came out squeaky clean, but the missus was not at all happy.

Nowadays for parts that need to be squeaky clean and oil free, I will boil parts in water with dishwasher compound. If I am really smart I will set up an old camping stove outside to do it.

: ^ )


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Dugger on Friday, October 21, 2016 - 12:13 am:

To Don Hatch: Well here in Calif. I have to go to an ACE HARDWARE Store and they have draino lye and I use for curing my Olives. For me I have to be careful that here Is no copper in it. A few years ago I would use Red Devil Lye, till our "SMART people banned it.


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