Clutch Lever Bolt and "Free" Neutral

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Clutch Lever Bolt and "Free" Neutral
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary M. Wheeler on Monday, October 24, 2016 - 08:23 pm:

I followed the "Adjusting for Free Neutral" article to the letter. After adjusting the yoke for the 1/16" play, the article goes into adjusting the clutch lever bolt.

What exactly happens to the transmission when it is turned down? It appears to "Rotate" the clutch lever CCW further than normal (lifting the rear more than normal), which would then "drop" the front more than normal, which would necessitate re-adjusting the yoke for the 1/16".

Am I right thinking that when the bolt is turned down, the 1/16" adjustment now becomes more like 1/8" or 3/16"? And can that bolt be turned down too much?

I have a good neutral with the brake lever straight up. When I carefully hold the low pedal in that position, and release the brake lever forward, she goes into high gear. There is some play in the transmission shaft, like the brake lever cam is "lifting" the shaft first before the rotational movement begins.

Thanks for any advice before I start messing things up.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Monday, October 24, 2016 - 09:03 pm:

If you get a good neutral by pushing in the low pedal, your bolt should be adjusted to put the clutch lever on the hogshead in the same position when the brake lever is pulled back. Both positions should give you a neutral. Although the instruction says "free neutral" it is not completely free. However if it is adjusted right you should be able to push the car without turning the engine and you should be able to crank the engine without the car moving. When you start a cold engine, it might creep a bit, but you should be able to stop it with the brake and as the engine warms up it should idle in neutral without the car moving.

When you push in the low pedal, you will see the clutch lever move until you reach neutral, then when you push the pedal farther toward low gear, the clutch lever does not continue to move.

The instructions in the diagram above is general information but you might find that for your particular car it might be a little different depending on the wear on the parts.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary M. Wheeler on Tuesday, October 25, 2016 - 05:17 am:

Hi Norm.. I get the best neutral with the brake lever vertical. When I hold the pedal steady in that position, and release the brake lever, she decidedly goes into high. Not that she's running wild, but you can hear the RPM's slow and the car begins to move forward.
It's tough at a traffic light because I always have to use the lever at each stop for fear of rear-ending the car in front of me.

Can that bolt be turned down too much? Will it hurt anything or wear anything prematurely? Is that even my problem here?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Killecut on Tuesday, October 25, 2016 - 06:45 am:

Gary, once you get a proper adjustment you should not have to use the hand brake for neutral in traffic. The more you drive it, it will be second nature to use neutral with the pedal and the brake.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Tuesday, October 25, 2016 - 10:49 am:

Take of the inspection cover and watch the fingers as you press the low pedal down. What you are looking for is the range of movement of the pedal and when the fingers pull back, are loose and the clutch is disengage but does not engaging the low band. That will show you how much travel the low pedal has between the band starting to clamp down for low, being in neutral and foot off in high.
One thing that some do not understand, is that in low and reverse the clutch is disengaged.
Could be that you are pressing the low pedal down more then you think and are engaging the low band just enough to cause drag (not high). If when the lever is pulled back and it can be put in neutral then you should be able to do the same with your foot. Except for the parking brake cross shaft lever, the same parts come into play.
You could also try backing off the low band a bit.
I worked on and drove a car that no matter what I did, there was just a short window where it was in neutral and low band engaging.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Tuesday, October 25, 2016 - 11:00 am:

Sometimes all connections are a little worn so the transmission needs a longer L-shaped clutch link to be able to be correctly adjusted as Royce describes in this thread: http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/411944/478111.html?1410398567


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stephen D Heatherly on Tuesday, October 25, 2016 - 11:06 am:

Sounds like your low pedal linkage is adjusted too short. Loosen the jamb nut and take the clevis pin out. Then put the brake lever in high and pull the pedal back. Then adjust the linkage until the holes in the clevis line up with the hole in the clutch lever. You may need to make the L shaped link longer to get it adjusted right.

Stephen


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Tuesday, October 25, 2016 - 04:22 pm:

I agree with Stephen. Adjust the link so that the clutch lever is in the same position with the pedal part way down as it is with the brake lever upright. This is by lengthening the link. You might need a new link or braze up the hole in the pedal extension because you have too much slack there. The chart shown above is for adjustment with good parts. If you find that the lever goes over center and the pedal sticks down, you need to shorten a half turn.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Tuesday, October 25, 2016 - 04:31 pm:

I find, in traffic, pulling into the garage and using reverse, that the hand brake lever holding neutral is a must. I don't know if this was part of the design but it's too good to pass up and requires less brain work. which is getting to be in short supply.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Addington on Wednesday, October 26, 2016 - 11:57 am:

I was never completely satisfied with mine until I reworked the pins and holes in the linkage to take out all the wear. My pins were badly worn and the holes in the foot peddle and the clevis were worn oblong. After all the wear was eliminated it worked like new. Really made a difference.


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