Cylinder head torque specs

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Cylinder head torque specs
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allen Brintnall on Wednesday, October 26, 2016 - 06:23 pm:

What are the torque specs for the cylinder head? My book says "tighten." Copper gasket, planed head, new bolts, cleaned holes. Allen Brintnall So. W. Mo.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Wednesday, October 26, 2016 - 06:39 pm:

Back in the day, there were no torque specs for Model T fasteners. Ford excersized crude control over the fastener torque by sizing the tooling so that an "average" man would end up applying the proper torque with reasonable effort.

That said, a common figure that many folks use these days is 45 - 55 foot-pounds.

Try a google search on "fastener torque mtfca" to reveal more threads on this subject. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie Dill on Wednesday, October 26, 2016 - 06:43 pm:

Hi Allen - I won't quote torque numbers because I only know what I've read or heard somewhere. I'm sure you will get some good advice here and I will be watching myself.

I write because upon removing the spark plugs from my engine, I noticed in one cylinder some globules of gelled anti-freeze (uh-oh). I posted on the forum and got a variety of comments. Certainly removing and remounting the head is on my short list. But then someone suggested tightening the bolts first. I did so on my "Z" head and went to 45 ft/ lbs. They were definitely much looser. I can't vouch for the accuracy of my torque wrench (the long needle type), but at first pressure, most bolts were at around 20 ft/lbs. I was able to tighten most, but since the engine is in the car, I couldn't get to a couple in the back.

So - questions for you - any thoughts about getting to those bolts in back? I don't have the clearance for anything other than an open end wrench. You also mentioned planing the head. If I still have a problem after my tightening job, I'll remove the head and find out if it's warped. If it is warped - planing? What's the procedure. I sort of hope that the answer is to take it to a local machine shop and they will know what to do.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Whelihan Danbury, WI on Wednesday, October 26, 2016 - 07:57 pm:

Allen, You talking about a standard head or one of the new aluminum ones out there (Z-Head, or PRUS Head). Use a magnet to find out for sure. The advice of 50-55 ft lbs works great for stock heads. Re-torque a couple of times when HOT to insure even sealing. For aluminum heads, I torque to 45 ft lbs, and re-torque after completely COOLED down 4-5 times before calling it good.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Wednesday, October 26, 2016 - 09:31 pm:

I have to ask and wonder did the Ford assembly line workers use some type of torque wrench or some way to evenly torque the head bolts when tightening them down.
As many times as they did it during a work day surely they didn't use hand wrenches.
Anybody know?

And by the way I didn't start using a torque wrench on my T's till 10-15 years ago. I just went by the Ford manual that stated to tighten the head bolts down evenly starting from the center and working outward. It is a good idea to use a torque wrench and use one now. Farmers and country boys when working on their T's didn't know what a torque wrench was back in the day.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allen Brintnall on Wednesday, October 26, 2016 - 09:42 pm:

Thanks guys, I'll shoot for the 50-55lbs. Kevin, it is a stock high head. Charlie, not sure about your clearance issue, I have the motor out. Will a universal joint help you? Also, the machine shop did the surface grinding for me. Thanks again for your in-put. Allen


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ted Dumas on Wednesday, October 26, 2016 - 09:53 pm:

Of its an early block 50-55 ft lbs will likely pullout the threads.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Thursday, October 27, 2016 - 12:12 am:

You can reach the back ones with a crow foot.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kim Dobbins on Thursday, October 27, 2016 - 02:39 am:

Right on Ted! That's just to much for 9-14 blocks. I don't go over 40.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Thursday, October 27, 2016 - 03:13 am:

Allen,
Do NOT go to 55 foot pounds, you will likely stretch the threads in the block. 45 is plenty!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allen Brintnall on Thursday, October 27, 2016 - 09:22 pm:

Thanks again for the help. I had stopped at 40, but didn't feel like it was enough. I sure didn't want to overdo it. Allen


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Aaron Griffey, Hayward Ca. on Thursday, October 27, 2016 - 10:31 pm:

I torque to 45.
I have always started with 20 , 35 the second round and finally 45.
I retorque cold to 45 after the engine has been run about a 1/2 hour or more.
Then again after an hour or two of running.
Retorque until they don't turn anymore. usually 3 times.
Some 25 or more years ago I torqued to 50. But after pulling a few threads I quit that.


Add a Message


This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Username:  
Password:

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration