Old Photo -Model T Era - Arlington Oregon, Home Of The Deep Apple Pie.....Hold my ankles I'm going In! :-)

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Old Photo -Model T Era - Arlington Oregon, Home Of The Deep Apple Pie.....Hold my ankles I'm going In! :-)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Wednesday, October 26, 2016 - 09:38 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Harper - Keene, NH on Thursday, October 27, 2016 - 12:50 am:

I am really surprised by the paucity of Fords in this picture, only the pickup on the left.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Landry, Hudson, NH on Thursday, October 27, 2016 - 12:08 pm:

Birthplace od Doc Severinsen. All this is now under the Columbia River. The town was moved in 1963 when they built a dam.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Thursday, October 27, 2016 - 12:26 pm:

Who's Doc Severinsen?? :-) The Tonight Show is but a shadow of it's former self. . . .


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Thursday, October 27, 2016 - 12:29 pm:

Chris,

I wonder if they tore it all down or just let the water cover it all up.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Thursday, October 27, 2016 - 01:34 pm:

A nice sunny day. Some color would make a great painting.
Thanks
Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dale L Myers on Thursday, October 27, 2016 - 02:02 pm:

It looks almost like a fallout shelter sign on the hotel.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Thursday, October 27, 2016 - 02:07 pm:

This is my stomping grounds. Sad what "progress" has done. The ferry across the
Columbia ran from Arlington to Roosevelt, on the Washington side. Arlington was
where one really got into the open desert, heading east. It would be a parched piece
of travel from there to Pendleton and the Blue Mountains. The building of I-84 (replacing
US 30) really changed the nature and feel of this corner of the world. It was a long
stretch of lonely and desolate before the interstate and dams made it just a blink between
other stations.

I first began going to Arlington as a kid, not long after the town was relocated up the gulch.
One of my earliest memories is of stopping at a tavern/pizza joint there while on our way
to various nearby duck and pheasant hunting venues that my old man and his friends liked
to haunt. On the side of the place was a cool neon sign that read:



For whatever sick reasons this kind of old and cool captured my attention as a kid, I always
liked looking at it whenever we came to town. As an adult, I traveled through Arlington and
noted the sign still hung up under the eaves, no longer lit, and gathering dust. For 20+ years
I tried to catch someone in the tavern to ask about it, but always came through in the morning
when no one was around. Last summer I finally caught the owner inside and bought it from
him. He thought I was nuts for even wanting it, let alone PAYING him for it.

It took a little work to get it working and looking good again. He said the reason it fell into
disuse was that Oregon changed it's laws to where he could no longer sell alcoholic beverages
to go, so he just disconnected the power and there it sat for the next 40 years.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Craig Sutton on Thursday, October 27, 2016 - 02:14 pm:

Thanks for sharing Burger. It's funny what sticks in our heads when we're younger. That's really neat you were able to save it.

Guess what? You just gave me an idea of what to do with all the insulators I inherited from Grandpa. Now they won't be in a box which is in my way on the floor!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Thursday, October 27, 2016 - 02:50 pm:

Craig,

Another early sickness of mine was a fascination with overhead wires and
hardware. Been collecting insulators now for 50 years. I have them all over
the place and am regarded as one of those historical loons within the hobby.

Anything you might ever want to know about them, just drop a line. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Thursday, October 27, 2016 - 03:09 pm:

Jay, thanks for posting such an important picture remembering this fantastic little town. What a beautiful, tree lined street. Progress or not, it's (at least to me) absolutely disgusting that something like the total decimation of this place had happened.
Burger..I love your "sign story". I agree with Craig about the insulators. I too have always loved 'em, just never had the "push" to collect them like you do. I had a few as a kid, my wife probably has more, I don't even know where they're at. As a kid, I actually collected commercial fish net floats that would always wash up on the beach. I was weird.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Warren Henderson, Dunbarton, NH on Thursday, October 27, 2016 - 04:04 pm:

Thanks for posting Jay! Burger, I enjoyed your "sign story", but way would anybody ever cover-up that beautiful Western Pacific sign. If you don't want it I'll pay you for it + shipping. I agree with Craig about the insulators, don't have any idea what ever happened to all those that I picked up along the Railroad tracks.

Happy motoring,

Warren


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Thursday, October 27, 2016 - 04:04 pm:

I have a few insulators, probably nothing rare, but my family's resort, Cave Springs, in Dunsmuir still uses them for the resort's electrical system, and I think there's still an almost full box of Hemingray 9s in the shop building. There's some of the wooden set offs too in there.
Hey Burger, I used to work at the Portola WP Museum, we sold those signs like yours (below the neon one). Love your neon sign too! And that's an unusual screen door!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Thursday, October 27, 2016 - 09:18 pm:

The Western Pacific sign is reproduced, but not the same size as originals, to keep fraud to a minimum.

My old man hunted the Feather River area as a kid. We moved away before I was old enough to go back
with him. He often referred to a place called "Box Canyon". Do you know where that is ? Just because
of the "Dad" connection, I have picked up a cool old framed photo of a WP steamer stopped at a whistle
stop log structure along the line and the old sign.

The "screen door" is actually redwood interior Victorian fretwork that will be installed in my place as it
progresses to the trim stage. I have collected stuff like this and proper stained glass windows for years
to make this place a period correct Queen Anne/Italianate building.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Thursday, October 27, 2016 - 09:55 pm:

If you ever find a WP Feather sign that isn't square and one top corner is cut away, that's a nose sign of a WP F unit.
Box Canyon rings a bell, but I don't remember where it is.
I see you do have a "few" insulators around the place!
Looks like you'll have an interesting house when you get 'near done' -- Mine is still a long ways away from that point, but I have to get going on it soon before I can't!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Friday, October 28, 2016 - 10:18 am:

It will finish out as a corner towered Queen Anne. Could not find one in the county that
was not loved and coveted by its owners, or requiring seven figures to buy and make right,
so I decided to do what I do best, ... build my own. Besides, who else has one with the
main floor as an auto shop ??? :-)

Probably 3-4 thousand insulators around here, all told. Most are part of research collections.
I'm not the guy with one of every shape and color. More about history, local use, etc. I also
chase the matching hardware. Glass baubles by themselves are just dust collectors. I like
to put them back in to service. Speaking of, if you ever need obsolete hardware to keep
your system functional, drop me a line.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Friday, October 28, 2016 - 09:18 pm:

Burger,
I will remember that; I've spent the last two summers (well, a week at a time, not the whole summers!) re-doing the main feeders on the back row of trailer spaces that also feeds the 1923 Auto Camp cabins. The trees grew over the old insulators, which were on metal brackets holding 3 and sometimes 4 spool insulators. Back in the day, we got this stuff at the hardware store. I lucked out, when we started this project, I was managing the local Theatre/performing arts center, and the Lineman's College was using it for their graduations. A word to one of the teachers, and voila! All the hardware I needed was given to me!! Yes, it was used, but in fine condition.
Now the resort is not loosing voltage through tree grounding losses!
Now if we'd had a bucket truck, the job would have gone MUCH faster, up and down a ladder leaning against a tree becomes no fun!
And. .. back to Ts!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Friday, October 28, 2016 - 10:50 pm:

A TT bucket truck ??? :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Saturday, October 29, 2016 - 01:55 pm:

Now THAT would be interesting to see! I have seen pictures of TT lineman trucks, but they usually have a tall ladder mounted in the bed, so you have to be directly under the wire (those were usually used for streetcar line work).


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Saturday, October 29, 2016 - 06:48 pm:

Well, you have the TT. Now just get to engineering a hand-cranked bucket
and riser arm that works from the bucket end ! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Sunday, October 30, 2016 - 12:29 am:

Hard to make out, but that is the neon sign above the door.

https://www.google.com/maps/@45.7190393,-120.2042095,3a,19.4y,85.74h,83.16t/data=!3m4!1e1!3m2!1suxEUlQ-TzOhY qed2B7uSrw!2e0


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Sunday, October 30, 2016 - 02:12 am:

Burger,
I will outsource that to Rube Golberg & Co.
:-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Sunday, October 30, 2016 - 03:43 pm:

For those that don't know me, I am something of a fruitcake. The reason I like TT trucks
is the steam era/Rube Goldberg aspect of spoked wheels, sputtering drive, and overall
shakiness of design. I consort with other likeminded weirdos whenever possible. Many of
which go to great lengths to build Rube Goldberg devices to actually perform simple tasks.
My own doorbell operates with 10' of chain, no less than nine cast iron spoked coal furnace
pulleys, a brass trolley bell, and a brass and blown glass pendant pull to make it ring.

A friend set out to build the most absurd contraption he could think of and ended up with
a 45lb., 5 foot by 1 foot monster of a pepper grinder with more gears and wheels and chain
drives than one could imagine. You wear it like a tuba player would hold a tuba, except this
thing is long and can reach across a table to grind pepper for the salad at the far side seat.
Funny as hell.

I love this kind of stuff. Why be boring ?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Monday, October 31, 2016 - 12:04 am:

Burger, if you haven't seen any of the Wallace & Grommit Clay animations, get "The Wrong Trousers" you will have a blast!!
I was wondering if you'd get my response!!! Not to worry!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Freighter Jim on Monday, October 31, 2016 - 02:30 am:

Burger is a fruitcake with nary a paucity of exotic fruits in the mix .... :-)


Freighter JIm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Monday, October 31, 2016 - 02:39 am:

10 bonus points for the use of the word "paucity".


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Monday, October 31, 2016 - 03:00 am:

Fruitcake--the origin of the Re-gifitng tradition! The gift that keeps on giving--year after year after year. . .!!
:-)
OK, that's enough for tonight!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Freighter Jim on Monday, October 31, 2016 - 04:19 am:

Then 20 points to Mr. Bill Harper of Keene, NH from whom I stole earlier in this thread .... :-)



Freighter Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Monday, October 31, 2016 - 04:31 am:

A bit-o-drift, slightly off topic.
When I was but a wee lad, one of my uncles was a cable television pioneer (along with my father). The two had been partners for awhile, then split over some differences of opinions, but remained close friends. My uncle bought a badly beat up, but not very old at that time telephone company ladder/bucket truck, 1954 GMC. We kids played on it often when it was kept at his house. The ladder extended via rope and pulleys, and was quite heavy. It became a family "right of passage" to be able to extend the ladder full height, and then swing the bucket full circle. This was accomplished from the top by throwing your weight around to force the ladder base to slide around the support ring. Nothing power or automatic about it. The truck had no outriggers, and with the ladder about thirty feet in the air, throwing your weight around rocked the truck pretty good.
When my uncle got himself killed in a plane crash (David, do you remember the blizzard of '64? My uncle was one of two planes that went down in the Sierras in that blizzard), the truck and several business interests became my dad's. I worked off the top of that thing a lot, but only drove it a few times. Right after I got my license, the truck, while stored at a project site, got vandalized so badly that it was junked soon after.
It may not have been old enough for my model T era interest. But many times, I have wished I had that truck, just to prune my trees with.
The earliest I have seen a similar rigging for a bucket/ladder truck was a late '30s truck.
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Monday, October 31, 2016 - 12:19 pm:

Wayne,
Yes, I remember that Blizzard, and reading about the two planes. We were without power for almost a week in Dunsmuir, and I spent almost all the time shoveling roofs, mostly on the trailers while my Dad and older brothers were kept busy doing the cabin roofs. That's the storm that took down the remaining stalls of the Roundhouse, the Methodist Church and the Community Hall--oh an a Garage downtown, and others--I forget them all. No power, no gas pumps, no gas, no snowplows! (longer story there, another time perhaps--related to the roundhouse caving in).


Add a Message


This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Username:  
Password:

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration