My first model T

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: My first model T
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Greg Joiner on Thursday, October 27, 2016 - 05:55 pm:

Will be getting this in a week or two.

Let me know what you think, it is a 1917 and while it was not started this year, the engine has ran in parades so it should be OK. And the brakes work and so on, has 4 new tires ready to go on as well. Would love any advice on what I should start with in order to be ready for next year. I did get some great feedback earlier as well


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Thursday, October 27, 2016 - 06:08 pm:

Congratulations! :-)

http://www.dauntlessgeezer.com/DG80.html

http://www.dauntlessgeezer.com/DG93.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Thursday, October 27, 2016 - 06:13 pm:

That was advertised for quite long time on Minneapolis Craigslist.

I was tempted to drive down to Mankato just to look at it since I have a 1917 roadster. I was curious if it was true 1917 Ford since folks have a bad habit of mis-dating these cars.

Did the seller tell you what "L.F.F.D" stands for?

I was thinking maybe it stood for "Little Falls Fire Department" (Little Falls is where Charles Lindbergh grew up.)

Does it have a Minnesota Pioneer license plate? If the number below 2100, I can tell you to whom the plate was originally registered.

Erik Johnson
Minneapolis


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Greg Joiner on Thursday, October 27, 2016 - 06:16 pm:

Thanks!

Eric I will check and see about a Minnesota pioneer plate ( my first thought is no) and you are correct about the LFFD. And according to the engine number it is a 1917


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dallas landers on Thursday, October 27, 2016 - 06:20 pm:

Being a volunteer fire fighter fo 32 years ( I LOVE IT )
I got my 1st T this spring. 26 roadster pickup. I went through bearings in front axle , replaced rear bearing, cleaned dried grease out of grease cups and put new grease in , cleaned and replaced oiler caps on suspension . Adjustments on brakes, timing, and transmition bands. I fought coils all summer and finally borrowed a new set . I'm sending mine out for rebuild this week. Drove it a lot this summer. Had a to. Of fun. Rear end rebuild in order this winter . Mine sat for many years without being ran. BEWARE !!! They multiply. I have two 26 roadsters and in process of bringing home a TT .
Do a little maintenance and drive it.
Drive safe and often


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Thursday, October 27, 2016 - 06:22 pm:

Here are more photos of the car - not really enough detail to really pick it apart. However, the wheels and steering wheel are later than 1917.

It seems to me that in some prior ads the seller posted some better photos. Looked like it had its original upholstery.

Also, in my opinion the advertised price was pretty fair but I would have to see the car in person to make a final determination. If you got it less for what it was advertised and the body wood is good, I would say you got a good price regardless if it is a 1917 or not.

If I owned it, I would try to track down the history of the car. Would be nice to know what town originally purchased it new.

1

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(Message edited by Erik_johnson on October 27, 2016)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Greg Joiner on Thursday, October 27, 2016 - 06:36 pm:

I have about 20 more pictures of it. and Erik, I wanted to see if I got a good price, I appreciate the comment


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Thursday, October 27, 2016 - 06:43 pm:

Those non-pneumatic front tires are hard to find, I would get some "spare" rims and mount the new tires on those, leave these alone.
Welcome to "the affliction."!
Someone check me on this, but the rears look like 1919 felloe and rims.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Greg Joiner on Thursday, October 27, 2016 - 06:46 pm:

He got 4 new coker tires and replaced the two on the back the front ones still need to be changed


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chad Marchees _____Tax Capital, NY on Thursday, October 27, 2016 - 06:46 pm:

I like it. A small part of me wants a fire department T, even though I have had nothing ever to do with fire fighting. Would love it if you posted your progress pics of getting it back in shape.

What the heck are the things on the front fenders?

I agree, I think it would be worth it to track down any history if possible. Even if it is just a case of they bought it to turn it into a parade vehicle. Always interested in the story as much as the vehicle.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter Claverie, Memphis TN on Thursday, October 27, 2016 - 07:07 pm:

First, drain the gas out, including the fuel line and carburetor - mostly using the drain on the bottom of the tank, but also the drain on the bottom of the carburetor. Then put a gallon of fresh gas in, and drain that out, using the drain on the bottom of the carburetor. Watch the gas coming out of the carburetor drain, and if it starts strong and then tapers off after a pint or so, you'll need to dig into the system and clean the screen on the bulb under the tank. Then fill the tank at least half way.

Next, drain the oil. Add a quart or so to the filler opening while the drain is open, to flush the gunk from the bottom of the pan. Then put the drain plug back in, and fill with oil until some dribbles out of the top petcock (run a nail or something into the petcock to make sure it's not clogged). Any oil will do. NOTE: After you've ruin the engine for a couple of hours, repeat this step, while the engine is hot.

Next, take out the four spark plugs, reattach them to their wires, and lay them on the block. Slowly turn the crank with the switch in BATT, and make sure all four plugs fire with a nice fat spark - the order is 1, 2, 4, 3.

While the plugs are out, put about a tablespoon of oil into each plug hole, and spin the engine over at least ten times. This will assure the cylinder walls are wet with oil. Be warned - when you start the engine, a LOT of white smoke will come out of the exhaust. Be ready for it. It's the residual oil burning off. Do it outdoors.

Before you put the plugs back in, put your thumb over the hole in cylinder #1 (the front one) and turn the engine slowly. When it blows your thumb off, you know you're on the compression stroke. Using a long screwdriver or piece of coat hanger wire or something inserted into the hole, slowly turn the crank until you can feel that the piston is at top dead center. The pin that the crank engages should be exactly horizontal. If you go too far, go around two turns of the crank to get back to where you want to be.

Now, push the spark lever (the left-hand one) all the way up. Turning on the key to BATT, the plug for #1 should fire. If it doesn't, turn the crank a little bit further, and it should fire. If not, you have a timing problem that must be addressed.

Now you can reinstall the plugs, turn on the gas, pull the gas lever (the right one) down about a third of the way, and try to start the engine. It is probably necessary to choke the engine for a couple of chugs, but it should fire up.

When it does, immediately pull the spark lever down about two thirds of the way.

As the engine warms up, you may have to fiddle with the mixture control (the wire sticking up through the dashboard) to make it run smoothly.

Now you're REALLY a Model T owner! Enjoy it! And welcome to the affliction.

Do not hesitate to ask any questions you might have, on this Forum. there are no dumb or silly questions! And we all love to show off our knowledge by helping each other, and especially newbies.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary H. White - Sheridan, MI on Thursday, October 27, 2016 - 07:50 pm:

Looks like a dog may have claimed the vehicle first. Maybe a Dalmatian?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Greg Joiner on Thursday, October 27, 2016 - 11:11 pm:

Thanks all.

I am a little confused on the tires. When I put on the coker tires that the owner has, will I have to replace the rims also? Is that part of the wood spokes or are they OK?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Thursday, October 27, 2016 - 11:23 pm:

The rims are designed for clincher tires. The tires come off the rims.

The rims themselves are demountable meaning they can be removed from the wheels. You would typically carry a spare rim with a tire mounted on it. When you get a flat, simply remove the rim with the flat from the wheel and install the other rim with the good tire on the wheel. You can then drove home and repair the flat at your convenience.

Starting with the 1919 model year, demountable rims were standard equipment for enclosed cars and optional for open cars.

Has nothing to do with the spokes.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Thursday, October 27, 2016 - 11:25 pm:

After looking at the photos again, the front rims may not be clinchers but may be aftermarket rims designed for the solid rubber tires that are currently mounted on the car.

Hard for me to tell.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Thursday, October 27, 2016 - 11:50 pm:

The Pneuflex tires (that's what Goodrich called them) are also demountables. But it would be unlikely they'd ever have to be demounted, being immune to punctures or blowouts. At this point though, with them being almost a century old, I sure wouldn't run on them. I expect they wouldn't last long.


Demounted Pneuflex


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Friday, October 28, 2016 - 12:01 am:

Lack of punctures or blowouts aside, hard rubber tires are prone to getting flat spots if they sit too long in one spot on the floor.

Being those are Pneuflex, they are different than a completely solid hard rubber tire, since they have those holes around the perimeter, but they are probably also susceptible to getting flat spots.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Friday, October 28, 2016 - 12:05 am:

Greg,
No one has mentioned it, but there are different versions of rims, and they have to be matched to the felloes. Your Fellows appear to have the slots for the retaining clamps, which is one particular rim (I don't remember which, check this site for that info. Anyway, the front rims are probably special to the tires, which are likely vulcanized to them. So, YES, you need some rims to mount your front tires.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter Martin, Sydney Australia on Friday, October 28, 2016 - 01:50 am:

I quite like the rocket launchers mounted on the front mudguards:-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Friday, October 28, 2016 - 04:59 am:

The rear wheel shown with the Excelsior tyre is a Kelsey wheel which should have a loose lug rim. The slots in the felloe are registers for one leg of the loose lug.
In my experience, the lugged rim fitted will not engage on the inner land of the felloe as it should, so all the driving force is transmitted through the four rim bolts.
The loose lug rims were commonly used on our Canadian sourced cars. The only lugged 23" rims we have came on just the 1925 Ts. I have the loose lugs if required, and the flanged nuts are available from the vendors.

Hope this helps.
Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jesse L. Ashcraft on Saturday, October 29, 2016 - 10:54 am:

>>>He got 4 new coker tires and replaced the two on the back the front ones still need to be changed<<<

I'd hang them up in the shop for display. Those have to be pretty rare, right?

Is that supposed to be a water tank on the back or did the car run on propane?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Greg Joiner on Saturday, October 29, 2016 - 11:47 am:

It was a chemical fire truck so it is a copper tank and that is where they stored the fire fighting chemicals


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Saturday, October 29, 2016 - 12:36 pm:

Jesse, you're right. It seems that very few have survived.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Saturday, October 29, 2016 - 01:52 pm:

Jesse,
That's the message I've been trying to get through to Greg. Don't mess with the front tires, get replacement rims for the new tires. I suspect the rims aren't clincher rims anyway, and the only way I can see to remove those tires would destroy them.
If Greg doesn't want the tires, I'm certain he could trade them for some good rims. Can't tell from the pictures what the front felloes are, it could be he needs front wheels too--the wheels could be 30x3 wheels.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Greg Joiner on Saturday, October 29, 2016 - 04:25 pm:

David, I would get replacement rims and mount the new tires on that and then take off the old ones with the rims on them and save the tire. SO i will so my best not to destroy them. I think that is how the back ones were done


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Saturday, October 29, 2016 - 05:05 pm:

Yes, absolutely save the Pneuflexes. That will be easy. Just remove four nuts and pull them off. As David says, you'll need a pair of rims for the new tires.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Greg Joiner on Saturday, October 29, 2016 - 05:10 pm:

I am guessing no one makes the Pneuflexes anymore! Looks like a cool tire


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By brass car guy on Monday, October 31, 2016 - 12:04 am:

I have an original unrestored 1913 Reo roadster that had the Pneuflex mounted on a rear wheel. This car was in a museum since 1940 never moving. The Pneuflex has a very nice flat spot where it was in contact with the floor. It now is on my spare tire carrier and creates lots of conversation.

just sayin'

brasscarguy


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Monday, October 31, 2016 - 01:34 pm:

Greg,

If not mentioned already, that's one KILLER of a chemical tank on your car! A very nice piece of fire fighting equipment, (and fairly valuable as well). That's a great, very well equipped little fire rig! Congratulations!


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