Kevlar ban material / low speed pedal

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Kevlar ban material / low speed pedal
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Eddie on Friday, October 28, 2016 - 10:27 am:

Can anyone recommend a supplier, looking for the low speed pedal accentric and replacement kevlar band material for a 26.

Wondering if the pedal accentric can be built up and re used?

Dave Eddie


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Friday, October 28, 2016 - 10:47 am:

I bought my only Kevlar band (I use it for the brake drum) from Rocky Mountain Machine Co, 3521 E St Vrain, Colorado Springs, CO 80909.
The pedal cam can certainly be built up with weld and ground to shape, but there are repro cams available too from the usual vendors like Lang's.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Friday, October 28, 2016 - 10:52 am:

The cams can be built up but for the price of a new one it wouldn't be worth it to me.

These are some pretty good replacement parts that the vendors sell and probably made by the same parts supplier. I replaced mine with new ones and it was well worth it to me.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Eddie on Friday, October 28, 2016 - 11:02 am:

Roger,

What do you use for band material on the low and reverse drums? I'm guessing you had issues with the Kevlar lining?

Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Friday, October 28, 2016 - 12:16 pm:

I'm notoriously tight with a dollar, but I'm with John. I'd spend the $16 for a new cam.

Kevlar bands are available from all the parts dealers. Some folks are afraid of them because they think Kevlar will overheat and crack their drums. But no matter what lining you have, friction makes heat. My theory is that if you're aggressive with the low and reverse pedals to minimize slippage, there won't be enough movement of the drums against the bands to produce that heat. Obviously you can't tromp down on the brake pedal with full instant force, and there will necessarily be drum/band friction when you use the brake. The answer to that is to use it as little as possible. Plan stops well ahead and slow down with engine braking, using the foot brake only at the end of the stop when you're moving slowly. I also help it out with the hand brake. Those linings are a lot easier to replace than transmission band linings. Going down steep hills, don't let the speed get away from you and make you use the brake. If it's steep enough that you'd have to climb it in low, go down in low.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Friday, October 28, 2016 - 12:35 pm:

Dave, I use cotton wood for my low drum and old stock Scandinavia with yellow lettering for my reverse band.

Partly as an experiment and partly as an educated guess what's optimal for me, given all the experiences I've read about on the forum. Kevlar may kill a drum if adjusted too tight and if applied improperly and wood or cotton may kill me if the brake band burns on a long downhill with less than optimal braking technique. So I thought Kevlar is proper for the brake, the brake drum seems sturdier than the others too. And I use the brake a lot, since I often drive fast with my light pickup.

Some have experienced less friction with kevlar and others feels the braking isn't effective with 3:1 in the rear end, but I have no problem with the brake effectiveness on dry pavement - it's when it's wet on the road I have a problem with locking rear wheels since the pickup is a bit light in the rear.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Friday, October 28, 2016 - 07:06 pm:

Replacing the pedal ramps will improve the problem, by half! If the ramps are worn, so will be the pedal ramp. To do a proper job the pedal should be removed from the shaft and then built up to compensate for the wear.

On our RHD cars, this is not such a hard job, as our low speed pedal is adjustable on the inside, meaning we can easily remove the pedal and shaft from the hogshead.

Hope this helps.
Allan from down under.


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