No way I would attempt this on the fly.....

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: No way I would attempt this on the fly.....
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Lynn on Thursday, November 03, 2016 - 11:25 pm:

I saw this on Epay, can you imagine having to do axle repairs out in the middle of nowhere like that?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Severn - SE Texas on Thursday, November 03, 2016 - 11:38 pm:

They did it in the hotel parking lot at night at The Texas T Party. Replaced a broken axle. The car was repaired and on the road the next morning. Amazing stuff.

Bill


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Harper - Keene, NH on Friday, November 04, 2016 - 12:06 am:

Ya gotta do what ya gotta do.

Dang. Well, let's get at it; it ain't gonna fix itself.

Back when men were Men and women liked 'em that way.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Friday, November 04, 2016 - 12:10 am:

We had a 56 DeSoto break an axle while on a tour over the Santa Cruz
mountains from San Jose to Felton. More amazing than the repair on the
side of the twisting mountain road was that someone had a spare 56 De-
Soto axle in their trunk !!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown North Central Arkansas on Friday, November 04, 2016 - 12:14 am:

My son and I replaced a broken axle, bearings, and all brake parts on the side of the road on his 1970 Ford Pk. The axle broke, probably because the wheel bearing seized up, then the wheel came off taking all the brake parts, backing plate, ect. Then it crashed to the highway skidding for awhile and set the grass on fire along side the highway. He kept the truck from burning, but several acres of highway easement were burnt before the fire dept arrived. They did not tow his truck because he told the police I was on the way and no tow truck needed. I took a complete rear end with me, but it was easier to change out the parts than it was to change the whole rear end. From the time of the axle breaking till he was on the road again was about 6-1/2 hours... I have also replaced the head gasket on my car on the side of the road. and a few other major repairs, while traveling and something breaks. "Poor folks have poor ways" as my grandfather used to say.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Troy Todd on Friday, November 04, 2016 - 01:53 am:

When we used to race a lot I changed pistons and heads in a parking lot more than once.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Friday, November 04, 2016 - 03:07 am:

Burger, Now, THAT is incredible! But I absolutely believe you.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter Kable - Kiama NSW OZ on Friday, November 04, 2016 - 03:41 am:

One of our members changed the crankshaft in his T on the side of the road about 20 years ago,(he kept one under the rear seat.) At the time he was on a long outback trip something he and his wife did by themselves often.

He is now in his 90's and still drives his 1912 T.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank van Ekeren (Australia) on Friday, November 04, 2016 - 04:14 am:

Not any more Peter, John failed his renewal for his licence a few years ago at 93, I bought his 1916 ute that he used for a town run-about and the 12 he gave to his son, he told me that he had been driving the 12 as a family car since 1938.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Friday, November 04, 2016 - 08:10 am:

Peter and Frank,

I hope I can do as well John and still be driving my Model T when I'm 92!

For all,

Bottom Line Up Front: I think the car is a 1917-1921ish USA car that has been retrofitted with a slant windshield and one man top.

Additional details:

Does anyone recognize the license plate? What country, state, province etc.? What year? If the year is in the middle I would guess 1929 or 1939 but I don’t know if that is the year or something else in the middle. And it isn’t that clear if the digit is a 2 or a 3.



Note that the car has the earlier 1915-1921ish style body with the wide arm rest and the 5 piece rear tub (note the bead above the rear fender and the seam going up on the side of the rear panel). It also is a 1922 USA (1920ish Canadian) or earlier as it has the top iron on the front seat for the two-man top.

But it also has the slant windshield that was introduced in the later part of calendar year 1922 for the 1923 model year USA cars. And in Canada the slant windshield was introduced earlier than the USA with the introduction in calendar year 1920. (There is some debate on when in 1920. I suspect it was another running change by Ford introduced during calendar year 1920. I.e. you could purchase one in 1920. How early in the calendar year is still to be determined – i.e. early enough to be a 1920 model year or so late that it would have been a 1921 model year. And for that matter I don’t think Ford cared about model years. He was selling new Model T Fords and at times you could easily purchase a new one that looked like the previous production and on the same day purchase one that had the features of the newer parts. ).

To my limited knowledge Ford did not produce a slant windshield touring with the two-man top irons on the front seat. I guess it theoretically could have happened – the last old style body could have been fitted with the new slant windshield and one man top. But Ford USA did not have that old style body around when the slant windshield was introduced. And it doesn’t appear to be Canadian production. I don’t see any door hinges on the left front area – although that area may be hidden by the man’s hat and the sign pole. I don’t see any gaps indicating a door such as the ones clearly visible on the rear door. And the car appears to have a fixed lug 30 x 3 demountable rim – which was only supplied new in Canada during the 1925 and later – the earlier ones had the loose lug Kelsey rims. I also do NOT see a Canadian horn button on the top of the steering wheel.

So my guess is the car was originally a 1921 or earlier USA body/car that was fitted with a later slant windshield and a one man top.

And from memory – which is not that great – I think this photo may have been discussed in the past? If so – did they say it might have been staged for a movie? Or I could easily have that confused with one of the other great photos that were staged for the movies.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Friday, November 04, 2016 - 08:58 am:

No idea why anyone would stage a shot like this but it was my first impression. The car's obviously in pieces and that "tire sign" seems to indicate a repair shop right near by. And why so close to the hotel sign? Miles of apparent room and they stop right where a sign is in the way of the work. It's quite odd.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry Kramer on Friday, November 04, 2016 - 09:06 am:

There appears to be rope around the top of the post nearest the car. Perhaps it was used to help hold up the car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Friday, November 04, 2016 - 09:10 am:

To me, that picture looks like a movie set. The license plate looks like a California plate from that era.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Friday, November 04, 2016 - 11:35 am:

My big roadside repair was with no road. About 1970 I was driving my Jeep wagon up a dry wash in the Mojave desert when my right front wheel struck a big rock and broke what on a Model T would be called the spindle arm. I spent several hours walking to Kelso, where I phoned my mom and had her come and fetch me. The next day I went to the Jeep dealer and bought a replacement, then returned to the desert with tools in the VW, which I could drive over the dunes without getting stuck. It was quite an adventure.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Friday, November 04, 2016 - 11:39 am:

One of the T's broke an axle on the Riverside Ca. tour about 15 years ago. It was removed and taken to Chaffin's garage and repaired that night. They were on the tour again the next day.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Friday, November 04, 2016 - 11:41 am:

My dad and his dad went to a plot of public land in northern Minnesota around 1935 driving in two T tourings that were cut off and made into flatbeds to haul cut grass. Dad's car broke a drive shaft. They took the other car and went to a local dump where they could get decent replacement parts for free. Then used a block and tackle and a nearby tree to haul up the back of Dad's touring to replace the broken parts.

They spent something like two weeks and hauled home grass that they sold for $15. After expenses Dad got to keep something like $4.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Friday, November 04, 2016 - 03:41 pm:

Wayne, I can go that one better. I bought my 58 as a turn-key car that had been "made pretty"
after being found in a garage. Originally a NY car, it suffered badly from rust and what repair
had been done was the easy and simple stuff. I gave the car a once over to make it mechanically
and aesthetically right, but trouble lurked deep under the surface. What started as a strange
rubbing noise under the rear of the car on deep wallows in the road grew more and more frequent
as my cross-country trip progressed. By the time we made it to the National meet and the
aforementioned tour, it was really becoming a problem. Yet is was impossible to figure out
what was causing it.

It was while the tour waited for the repair of the broken axle that I got under my own car and
really gave it a hard look and came to the conclusion that the body itself was slowly sagging
under the rust-weakened panels and making contact with the drive shaft, even though the stop
bumpers that would logically keep it from doing so looked to be in perfect working order. Back
in S.F., I hunted down some materials and built a makeshift stiffener to stop the sagging for the
rest of the trip.

Another oddity that occurred on that trip was the burning out of mufflers. The car got loud about
500 miles in and proceeded to need muffler replacement every 1000 miles or so along the 3700 mile
trip. And the floors were getting hot too. Upon getting home, I reviewed the situation of replacing
the heads with some HP 906 heads just prior to the trip. The advice of keeping the original push
rods turned out to be wrong, and I was leaving valves open enough to blow fire straight down the
pipes ! Yet strangely, my go-fast was excellent and fuel economy was up from around 12 to 17mpg !

A quick swap of the push rods and some fresh mufflers and it ran better than ever. Simple, but
baffling and hard to dial in while out on the road.


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