Old Photo - A South Dakota Farm During The Dust Bowl, 1936

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Old Photo - A South Dakota Farm During The Dust Bowl, 1936
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Thursday, November 10, 2016 - 09:35 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Thursday, November 10, 2016 - 09:39 am:

That is a eye opening photo of the dust bowl era and the devastation that it caused.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Thursday, November 10, 2016 - 09:39 am:

Great pic, Jay - Note the rolled-up side curtains hanging from one of the top bows!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Warren Henderson, Dunbarton, NH on Thursday, November 10, 2016 - 09:56 am:

Great photo Jay! I always wondered where I parked the T the other night during that dust storm. If I go back and find it, would it still be a barn find?

Happy motoring,

Warren

speaking of barn finds, Ken is smiling with his new TT snowmobile


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Brian Beatty _Kansas City on Thursday, November 10, 2016 - 10:00 am:

Love that picture so I Googled it. It appears to be taken in Dallas, South Dakota in 1936.

A high-resolution copy can be found here:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Dust_Bowl_-_Dallas,_South_Dakota_1936.jpg

It is a USDA photo and is in the public domain


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom VanMeeteren Valley, Nebraska on Thursday, November 10, 2016 - 03:26 pm:

That is what you would define as "buried treasure"


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Thursday, November 10, 2016 - 05:49 pm:

Around here we live in the Mississippi river bottoms, but there are bluffs not too far from here. The bluffs are made of limestone sediments and are maybe a hundred feet tall. The story I am told is that the bottom ground was carved out by a glacier that descended from the north in an ice age. While the ice was stacked up next to and above the bluff there was a deposit of wind blown soil put next to the ice at the top of the bluff.
This the "wind blown loess soil" that is still around there today.
While I was looking at the above photo I was reminded about the loess soil around here and could see a similar chain of events.
Once I was in Chama New Mexico near Kit Carson National Forest and was able to see the soil there. It looked for all the world just like the soil right here in Missouri on the bluff. I wonder if it could have traveled that far.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Thursday, November 10, 2016 - 07:33 pm:

The devastation during that time was just plain sad. This picture really brings it home. Thanks for posting Jay.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Eviston on Thursday, November 10, 2016 - 08:13 pm:

'A nation that destroys it's soils destroys itself'. Teddy Roosevelt.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Thursday, November 10, 2016 - 08:36 pm:

I can hear some purist griping now about the grit on the running boards scuffing the paint !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary H. White - Sheridan, MI on Thursday, November 10, 2016 - 09:16 pm:

No! It is not still there.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Lloid on Thursday, November 10, 2016 - 09:30 pm:

Lots of our old cars made it from through times. Those were some of the worst for the people, livestock and their Ts, well and A s. I assume those folks though the world was ending... Tim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Thursday, November 10, 2016 - 09:52 pm:

I grew up around a lot of oldtimers who lived through the Depression and
Dustbowl times. They were fascinating to listen to as they told their stories.
Many were hoarders of all sorts of wonderful old junk. My favorite kind of
people. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Eviston on Thursday, November 10, 2016 - 10:05 pm:

Sometime back, a Brush was dug out of a fencerow that had been buried. Seems like they got it running with minimal trouble, considering. IIRC.


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