Early TT, new and all slick looking-Photo

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Early TT, new and all slick looking-Photo
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Friday, November 11, 2016 - 08:46 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Friday, November 11, 2016 - 08:49 am:

Now that's a very cool TT!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Friday, November 11, 2016 - 08:53 am:

Are my eyes playing tricks, or is the rear window also a roll-up curtain?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Friday, November 11, 2016 - 08:55 am:

I have seen a local model t truck with a roll up rear window like that.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Albert Lemon on Friday, November 11, 2016 - 09:16 am:

Agree with all three of ya's, that's a roll-up rear window. Has to be the closest thing to air conditioning (air flow). That's COOL........


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Friday, November 11, 2016 - 10:02 am:

This truck would suffer no constriction of air flow with that body design,
rear curtain rolled up OR down !

All I have to do is tilt the windshield out on my most air-restrictive box
cab and I can enjoy a hurricane to the face ! Not sure how the physics
work on that, as the truck can only go about 15-20 comfortably. One of
those mysteries of the universe.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert L. Rampton on Friday, November 11, 2016 - 02:41 pm:

All- here is some background info I can add to this great TT photo. The Ogden Packing & Provision Co., or OP&PC was incorporated in Ogden, UT in 1901. By 1916 it had become one of the largest meat packing operations west of the Missouri with a factory complex that eventually covered more than 6 acres. It grew so fast due to Ogden being the terminus and hub of both the Union Pacific and Southern Pacific railroads. The Ogden stock yards were huge. During WWI they fulfilled many government contracts to supply meat to the military and rapidly expanded out of state accordingly. However, after the war, big government contracts ended or dried up and by 1920, OP&PC was unable to pay its debts and shortly entered bankruptcy and closed. Such a great photo.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Layden Butler on Friday, November 11, 2016 - 03:08 pm:

Very early TT indeed. Perhaps 1918 as it has over the axle wishbone and solid rear tires. Can anyone supply a picture of that tail lamp bracket?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Friday, November 11, 2016 - 04:00 pm:

Very early indeed. At first, I thought maybe it even had the horn button on top of the steering column, but I zoomed in on the picture and could see that it appears to be the combination horn/light switch.
Interesting in so many details. The chassis and wheels are painted a light color, and pin-striped (even the frame and running board brackets)! The front tires appear to be smooth. I wonder if that could have continued later on trucks than cars?
Thanks all!
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Chillingworth on Friday, November 11, 2016 - 08:32 pm:

Looking at the right front wheel, do I see a square fellow? How about the front spokes - are they round or oval? I know the Ford archives mention square fellow wheels being provided by April 1918, but round spokes weren't mentioned until July 1921. Is this the way it was? From original cars were round spoke clincher wheels ever produced at an earlier date?

Also, when where smooth front tires last used?

The reason I ask is that I have an early TT chassis that I acquired w/o wheels. I've found a pair of nice solid tire rear wheels and a nice pair of square fellow round spoke clincher front wheels. Could this be compatible for a 1918 TT?

Thank you for your input.

Rich C.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jason - UT on Sunday, November 13, 2016 - 02:01 pm:

Layden mentioned this truck has an over the axle wishbone. Can someone supply a picture of one so I can better understand? I'm a rookie :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Sunday, November 13, 2016 - 03:22 pm:

Rich I have the solid rubber rear tires on my 1918 TT. I have demountables on the front, but have the square felloe wheels to put on if I want to.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Sunday, November 13, 2016 - 03:42 pm:

Jason,

Ford changed the front axle spring perches and the front wishbone/radius rods in Mid 1919 (ref:http://www.mtfca.com/encyclo/doc19.htm
APR 14, 1919
Acc. 235, Box 39, #385, Ford Archives
"From this date two distinct designs of front radius rods, together with front spring perches, right and left, one on the Model T and the other on Model TT.
"The Model TT design will be assembled beneath the axle, instead of above the axle through the spring perch as heretofore.
"Although it would be possible to use the Model T design on the Model TT, we request this be resorted to only in case of a shortage serious enough to threaten loss of production."

Below is an illustration from the Price List of Parts showing the old and newer version of the spring perch:



Below is the 1909-mid 1919 wishbone that fit into the hole in the earlier spring perch. That hole was above the axle so the wishbone was also above the axle.



Below is the mid 1919 to 1927 wishbone. It had holes in the wishbone ends and was bolted below the axle to the spring perch bolt that protruded through the bottom of the axle.



And while it is often hard to see the wishbone location (I tried to find some good photos) the black painted part in the shadow of the car often does not show up well in the photos of the.

Below is a photo posted by Phil Mino that shows an above the axle wishbone (note the nuts on the wheels still need to be staked -- it is for illustration of the wishbone).



And below is a photo from page 33 Nov-Dec 1975 "Vintage Ford" used by permission to promote our club and our hobby that shows the later below the axle wishbone.



And then to make things confusing some folks added a later wishbone to their earlier car or purchased an accessory wishbone as shown below on the Rip Van Winkle 1917 Ford (again from the "Vintage Ford" used by permission). Two views to make it easier to see:





And why would Ford make that change? Good question. According to the oral history given by one of the chief designers involved with the Model T, Joseph Galamb and printed in Stern's book "Tin Lizzie" he shared:



I hope that help some.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Sunday, November 13, 2016 - 03:51 pm:

Wishbones -

Early, over the axle:

pic1 pic2



Late, under the axle:

pic3


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Fielding "Ewe-taw" on Sunday, November 13, 2016 - 05:01 pm:

Herb,
Thanks for posting. I had never heard of the Ogden Packing and Provision Co. so I had to do a bit or research. I am very familiar with the Ogden Stock yards, the only thing that remains of the whole industry is the Swift building.
Thanks again,
Kevin

http://historytogo.utah.gov/utah_chapters/statehood_and_the_progressive_era/ther iseandfallofogdenspackingcompany.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Layden Butler on Sunday, November 13, 2016 - 05:09 pm:

For those who have run across an under the axle wishbone with straight holes ( no tapered countersink), they were early production and used plain castle nuts without integral taper. Prone to wear badly and quickly redesigned with the taper.


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