How early cameras photographed fast model Ts

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: How early cameras photographed fast model Ts
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Monday, November 14, 2016 - 02:59 pm:

For those of you who are also photo history buffs. Here is a picture taken of me driving my speedster last Saturday. It was taken with a 1920s Graflex camera with a vertical cloth focal plane shutter. Exposure was 1/240 of a second at f11.

This effect is caused by the vertical shutter exposing one end of the wheel and by the time it gets to the other end the car has moved forward.





speeding T


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mundinho Falcao on Monday, November 14, 2016 - 03:06 pm:

Shades of Lartigue...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Monday, November 14, 2016 - 04:49 pm:

Yes ... so we do have some early photography historians in the group. Guess this was lost on the rest. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Monday, November 14, 2016 - 04:53 pm:

In Mark's photo the shutter is opening vertically. If you turn the camera sideways then you get a lengthened car, because the shutter would be moving horizontally instead of vertically as in your photo.


Later camera designs (Maybe Leica was the first?) used a shutter mechanism that opened from the center and closed radially. Like the intro shot to any James Bond movie.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Monday, November 14, 2016 - 05:03 pm:

It would actually depend on which way the car was going. Could be a very long car .. or a very short one.

We have an amazing glass negative collection here at George Eastman Museum of a pioneer auto photographer Nathan Lazarnick. he shot for Scientific American and many other magazines. Lots of great unpublished shots of the Glidden tours and races. So many of them have this effect of the vertical shutter.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mundinho Falcao on Monday, November 14, 2016 - 07:05 pm:

Yes, a pity we did not meet up in Taipei.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham on Monday, November 14, 2016 - 08:42 pm:

Wow, Mark, having a Graphlex single-lens reflex camera is maybe even "cooler" than having a Model T !! I found one in a pawn shop in Victoria, BC in 1970 for $50 . . . but I didn't have fifty bucks to spare . . .


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Monday, November 14, 2016 - 09:03 pm:

My Speed Graphic has a focal plane shutter, but I have to confess that I've never used it. I guess I need to do that sometime and make some "leaning car" photos.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Monday, November 14, 2016 - 10:36 pm:

Yes, the Graflex has both a leaf shutter on the lens and the cloth focal plane shutter. Most people who use these today only use the leaf shutter.

But if you want to do these "speed" pictures you have to use the focal plane shutter and have the car run left to right with the camera shooting from the side.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Landry, Hudson, NH on Wednesday, November 16, 2016 - 01:27 am:

Why does it matter which way the car is moving? The shutter moves bottom to top. No matter whether the car is going left to right or right to left, the top of the wheels will be further in the direction of travel than the bottom.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roar Sand on Wednesday, November 16, 2016 - 09:43 am:

If I am not too confused, the image is upside down at the focal plane (film), so the shutter then moved from top to bottom.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Craig Sutton on Wednesday, November 16, 2016 - 10:15 am:

Thanks for sharing, Mark. That is really neat.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Landry, Hudson, NH on Wednesday, November 16, 2016 - 10:29 am:

Roar - you are correct, but I still don't think it matters if the car is going left to right or right to left.


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