Model t 4 door

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Model t 4 door
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By harold Chambers on Monday, November 21, 2016 - 05:41 pm:

don't see many model t 4 door why is that?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steven Thum on Monday, November 21, 2016 - 05:54 pm:

The most expensive of the later Ford cars, Plus those of us that have one will not let them go as they are in my my wife's opinion the most comfortable.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Monday, November 21, 2016 - 06:03 pm:

I for one have been seeing too many lately...:-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Monday, November 21, 2016 - 07:13 pm:

The wood rots out and costs twice what the car is worth to replace. Same reason there are not many 1914 - 1936 Chevrolets. They became unusable when the bodies rotted away.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Matthew Atchinson on Monday, November 21, 2016 - 07:27 pm:

I missed an opportunity 4 years ago to purchase a 1923 fordor for $3,000. It had been through a flood and water had gone about 2 1/2 feet up the sides, hence why it was so cheap. The widow who's husband had owned it wanted it gone. I told her I'd sell my chassis and put together the money but it would probably take a month so if someone else came along to not wait on me. Of course, someone already had the cash in hand and got it. Met the guy that bought it: car is a 1950's restoration but still has solid albeit somewhat faded paint. good solid original upholstery and the motor saw no damage from the flood and runs great after a fuel line/carb replacement. imo the Fordors are a gorgeous car and I'm still kicking myself for missing that one. $3,000 for a great driver!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By steven miller on Monday, November 21, 2016 - 07:29 pm:

I've never seen a three door. Only British Colonies got the four door


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wes Nelson ........Bucyrus, MO on Monday, November 21, 2016 - 09:49 pm:

I'm not associated with this.

http://springfield.craigslist.org/cto/5883728104.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Lloid on Monday, November 21, 2016 - 10:45 pm:

Cool project. I like all of them but really like a 2 door sedan the best..


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Tuesday, November 22, 2016 - 05:44 am:

Actually you can do a complete re-wooding of the Fordor's for about $400.00 of Ash including the top. It requires many hours of patience and fitting and re-fitting. I've done three in the last 3 years and they can be overwhelming at times. I feel its all a matter of mindset. The Fordors are a very comfortable car and offer shelter from the rain and sun which is a nice advantage. current project. Ed Baudoux's carriage. my own mover/shaker.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Jefferson, Ohio on Tuesday, November 22, 2016 - 06:33 am:

I'm glad you posted Don and thanks for the pictures. They are a beautiful car and you do beautiful work.

I see Wes has found you another one! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By n maver on Tuesday, November 22, 2016 - 06:35 am:

Don that's a fabulous car you have ! and you are a true artist when it comes to restoring these Fordor's , we are extremely honoured and lucky to have you in the hobby

Norrie


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steven Thum on Tuesday, November 22, 2016 - 07:29 am:

I had 2 tudors before I lucked into our Fordor. Wife hated the passenger seat in the tudors as they were small and did not brace her back and thus were uncomfortable. She would not sit in the back. I liked the wider doors on the tudor. The fordor has very narrow doors.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Blake, Kansas City on Tuesday, November 22, 2016 - 09:08 am:

Speaking of Fordors, I have for some time been confused about the timing of the introduction of and discontinuing of the closed cars. I have looked in the encyclopedia for the answers but all I'm sure of is the date the Fordor was announced:


"OCT 10 (Letter from Louisville Branch)
New Fordor Sedan described. Price: $725, FOB Detroit."


What I can't find or have overlooked is the date the center door was discontinued and how long it overlapped Fordor production and if the Center door also overlapped production of the conventional Tudor.

Also, the announcement of the Fordor does state the body panels were made of aluminum, but I am aware that over time the aluminum content was progressively reduced, but again I see no reference in the chronology of changes. Can someone please set me straight? (easier said than done)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Tuesday, November 22, 2016 - 09:12 am:

Would love to have a 4-door. Much as I love "the dog's" Model A, I'd sell it for a 4-door T or do a trade. Then she could get in the T a lot easier.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Tuesday, November 22, 2016 - 11:37 am:

Most of them are up in Canada! Ford called the above car a Fordor.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Tuesday, November 22, 2016 - 12:01 pm:

Gary, did you read this page at the encyclopedia? http://www.mtfca.com/encyclo/1921-25H.htm

"The Centerdoor Sedan continued until about June 1923 and was replaced with a new two door Sedan. The Coupe continued in the 1922 pattern as well until June and was then replaced with a new design based on the Tudor Sedan."

"The 1924 Fordor Sedans were changed during the year to use all-steel doors instead of the wood and aluminum types used earlier."


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By ken bechtel on Tuesday, November 22, 2016 - 06:22 pm:

Don, my T had a set of those little wheels under it for almost two years. i still have them, never know when i might need them again. your work very nice. Ken


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Wednesday, November 23, 2016 - 06:18 am:

Thanks for the kind words guys. I'm hoping this is the last one I do. This wasn't my idea of retirement but rather a hobby gone wild. My point is don't be afraid to take on a Fordor if that is the car you want. Its a shame to discard these classics because of a self inflicted fear that it can't be done or you can't do it. Everyone needs something that challenges them in order to feel the true value of the finished product. I'm not convinced that the Fordors are that more difficult but rather they take more time to finish.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By n maver on Wednesday, November 23, 2016 - 06:55 am:

Don that's a fabulous picture of you and your car,I didn't realise you were so young 26/27?? that explains all the energy you have for doing these cars so quickly :-) :-) :-)

Norrie


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Wednesday, November 23, 2016 - 07:41 am:

Thanks Norrie, yeah right....62 and counting. Its all catching up to me now...more driving and less sanding is in my future..fun stuff though.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joe Andulics on Wednesday, November 23, 2016 - 07:54 am:

Great car to haul all the grandchildren!



Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Wednesday, November 23, 2016 - 09:29 am:

What a great memory for these youngsters...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Wednesday, November 23, 2016 - 11:05 am:


On my June 16, 1923 Fordor the hood (low) and cowl are steel, the doors are aluminum, the body panels over the rear fenders are steel, and the upper and lower rear panels are aluminum. In the seventies when the previous owner, Gene Salzman, pulled it out of a shed after its forty-year nap, it was the original black. But he noticed that some of the black had a bluish tinge, and that's how he discovered the aluminum panels. He stripped the black and painted the steel parts to match the aluminum.

This is the car that ran for about ten seconds when I got it home, but contained the infamous fiber timing gear. When I have the 1915 roadster and the 1923 touring done, getting the engine/transmission in this one up to snuff will be my next project.


(Message edited by steve_jelf_parkerfield_ks on November 23, 2016)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Wednesday, November 23, 2016 - 04:05 pm:

That's a sweet Fordor Steve, I have to wonder if there is much of a weight difference between the aluminum and all steel cars?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Wednesday, November 23, 2016 - 04:17 pm:

Through the 1950's when the antique car hobby was just beginning, it was mainly the younger people who used to drive the old cars. Almost all the cars from the Model T through the 1950's models, the 4door was considered "Grandpa's car" or the "Family Car". However the open cars, coupes and tudors were popular with the younger generation.

You are going to hate me when I tell you what I did. I had a 1931 Model A Fordor with Briggs body which was in good condition. I wanted a Phaeton, so I bought a Phaeton body from the junkyard and cut up the Fordor with a cutting torch so I could fit it into a trailer and haul it to the junkyard. Then I put the Phaeton body on the chassis.

Anyway, although it was the most expensive car when new, it was also the most unpopular car when they began to collect them. These days they are all equally in demand and in the colder wetter climates, they are better for driving than the open cars.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Wednesday, November 23, 2016 - 04:20 pm:

Don, I've heard that Ford phased out the aluminum because there wasn't enough of a weight difference to justify it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Wednesday, November 23, 2016 - 05:28 pm:

Norman, shame on you...

Steve, have you had a chance to look at that aluminum and do you have a idea of the gauge? I would think it would have to be a fairly heavy gauge so not to show stress lines or buckling. I find it quite interesting that Ford used it for the Fordor with all the flexing and twisting the body goes through compared to a touring or roadster.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Wednesday, November 23, 2016 - 06:09 pm:

I would think the Touring flexes more, since it's an open "bowl" while the Fordor has more of a box structure.
The problem with the Fordor is the 2000 lb weight, it's hard on the 20 hp chassis originally built for a 1200 lb car, so every weight reduction was valuable. Ford did the same when the Centerdoor was introduced for 1915 - the first years production had aluminum skinned bodies.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By kep on Wednesday, November 23, 2016 - 08:00 pm:

Why do some have the cowl like a model A does and others do not?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Otto on Wednesday, November 23, 2016 - 08:21 pm:

Late to the party, however I'd like my next T to be a four door


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Wednesday, November 23, 2016 - 09:02 pm:

Kep, I think there was a design change to the "Model A style" in the cowl for the '26/'27 Fordors?
If so, there were three smooth versions before - the first low cowl without any cowl vent from October 1922, low cowl with vent like Steve's above and the '24-'25 high cowl for the high radiator.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Gumbinger, Kenosha, WI on Wednesday, November 23, 2016 - 09:13 pm:

Steve, Gene Salzman, the previous owner of your Fordor, used to live in Pardeeville, WI. I knew his nephew, and the nephew and I used to talk about Gene's T's, but I never met Gene. He's probably gone by now....

Keith


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Wednesday, November 23, 2016 - 10:35 pm:

Yes Keith, he died in 2004 at age 89. I bought the car from his nephew, Jack Gaffney, in Phoenix.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James Mitchell on Thursday, November 24, 2016 - 07:37 am:

This one could be yours


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed Baudoux Grayling Michigan on Thursday, November 24, 2016 - 09:00 am:

Norm. I have another story that may help you feel better. Dad had an A roadster pickup. Truck plates were expensive, so he scrapped the body and put a sedan body on it. I think he came out four dollars ahead, not counting his labor.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Thursday, November 24, 2016 - 09:51 am:

The downside of the Model T Fordor is the work and cost of the wood structure in trying to restore one.
I sold a 25 T Fordor 20 years ago for that reason. I Inherited it from my Grandfather along with the 24 Coupe he had.
He bought the 25 Fordor for parts for the Coupe he was driving.
He always had the Coupe in his little garage but only covered up the 25 Fordor with a piece of tarp.
Don't expect to restore one and make a big profit. It wont happen.
The 25 Fordor slowly rotted down over the years. It was a 90% complete car and all the sheet metal was good BUT the body wood just deteriorated to the point of no return.

T's don't last long in the weather and the closed cars are the quickest to ruin.

Don't restore one and expect to make a big profit. You wont do it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Thursday, November 24, 2016 - 10:16 am:

Don't expect to make a big profit on restoring any T, open or closed. In fact, in most cases plan on selling at a loss.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dale Peterson College Place, WA on Thursday, November 24, 2016 - 11:54 am:

I finished restoring a Fordor last year, can't get the wife to ride in the others now. As far as amount of work to restore, I thought I would never get it done! And I purchased a wood kit. For the power to weight ratio, I put a 280 cam and high compression pistons in along with a 10 tooth pinyon and the only one that can tell the difference in performance from the touring is my tow vehicle. You really can tell the difference in weight when it is in the trailer.
By balancing the tranny, it runs smooth and can keep up with any other T on tours, even on the hills!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rick Goelz-Knoxville,TN on Thursday, November 24, 2016 - 11:57 am:

Here is my March 24 with aluminum doors and panels, it was in fair shape when I got it, it only needed a belt rail and top wood.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Thursday, November 24, 2016 - 12:40 pm:

Cropped, then stretched vertically by 40%:

pic


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rick Goelz-Knoxville,TN on Thursday, November 24, 2016 - 01:23 pm:

Thanks, the resizer made it wonky.

Rick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Thursday, November 24, 2016 - 01:30 pm:

If you're using Paint to resize, be sure to stretch/skew the picture the same amount vertically and horizontally. More sophisticated programs often have a box you can check to lock the "aspect ratio". :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By n maver on Friday, November 25, 2016 - 03:43 pm:

Mark I love you 24 that's a very nice blue colour.Do you have any idea what colours were available on these enclosed cars.

N


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William Cuddy on Friday, November 25, 2016 - 04:32 pm:

My 1925 Fordor.

FORDOR


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