Advice on starting the Kingston B-1 Gasifier

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Advice on starting the Kingston B-1 Gasifier
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Kelsey on Monday, November 21, 2016 - 08:07 pm:

The Kingston Gasifier that I purchased three years ago at a swap meet was extremely warped and, although it ran well, it leaked exhaust, which wasn't too good for the passengers in the cab. My cousin, who is a fantastic machinist and welder, was willing to fix it. I brought him a junk block and he welded up two cracks in the manifold and straightened it so that it mated up perfectly with the block.

The carburetor runs wonderfully once I get the engine started, but is a bear to start. I have adjusted the "idle needle" such that it idles really well (I followed Murray Fahenstock's instructions) and I don't believe that anything is plugged because the engine accelerates easily and has a lot of power, once warmed up. MWhat I am doing, which is what I used for the Holley Vaporizer, is to pull out the choke while pushing the starter button, then push it in when the engine fires up, which generally happens on 2-3 turns of the engine. My Holley Vaporizer ran well, but didn't have as much power as the Kingston. y question is for those that have used this carburetor about how to get it started on a few cranks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James A. Mahaffey on Wednesday, November 23, 2016 - 11:03 am:

Jim,

The most charming feature of the Kingston B-1 Gasifier is its choke design. If it's hard to start, then there's something wrong with the choke.

The best way to explain the choke is with the patent diagram.

The choke scheme is unique to this type carburetor. (This diagram is actually a combination of the Kingston B Regenerator and the B-1 Gasifier, but it does show the choke mechanism.) With the choke knob pulled to the stop, the main air induction is closed, plus the air-leak valve for pulling an air-gas mixture through the pre-heat chamber is blocked by valve 16. Under this condition, raw gas is drawn up through passage 22, to junction 28, and through the injection nozzle 29. It is sprayed against the top of the intake manifold and falls by gravity into the intake ports. It should only take one or two revolutions of the crank to prime the cylinders under any temperature condition.

But, there is a difference between the model B and the B-1 carburetors. The diagram shows the B, which has a compensating passage, 30, intersecting the injector line. It partially balances the injection pressure on both ends of the fuel injector, limiting the choke action.

The B-1 has an adjustable valve for this compensator, with which you can adjust the force of the choke injection. It's called a needle valve, but it is not a mixing needle valve. It's just an air valve, and the face of the "needle" is a cone. With this valve fully closed, the choke action is severe, and it can easily flood the engine. Fully open, the choke effect is barely noticeable.

On the B, the injection nozzle is a tiny hole drilled into the cast iron throttle chamber. On the B-1, it's an inserted brass nozzle. To get any choke action, the hole just be open all the way down to junction 28.

With the air-valve closed down all the way, two rotations of the crank with the choke knob pulled should flood the engine. Pull a plug. It should be wet with gasoline. If not, then you are not getting any choke action.

Your intake manifold must have a perfect seal with the block for the choke to operate, and the gaskets for the float chamber and the down-extension must be sealing correctly.

A Kingston B-1 should fire up and start after one turn of the crank from dead cold. Note the concave depression in the base of the air cleaner/silencer. This is supposed to be filled with a pool of engine oil, squirted from an oil can though a side-port. Air is drawn in over this oil-pool, and dust is supposed to be captured on the surface. This was the only factory-installed air cleaner ever used on a Model T. I've been tempted to put a wad of steel wool in this bulb to enhance the air-cleaner effect.

Please post a picture of your carburetor! From what I've seen, it's finished like a new, factory-fresh Kingston B-1.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Kelsey on Wednesday, November 23, 2016 - 12:17 pm:

Jim:

As always, thank you for the help. I printed out the drawing, but I am having a difficult time reading the numbers. On the top drawing, some of the numbers are unclear. Would you mind clarifying the numbers, please?

On the top drawing starting from the left side and going down, I have #36, 35, 2?, 2?, 11, 5, 7, 23?, 24. On the right side, going down, I can read 34? 33a, 2, 34? 31, 3, 27, 4, 12, 25, 26, & 6.

Does a guy have to remove the venturi to get to injection nozzle 29 in order to see if it is plugged?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James A. Mahaffey on Wednesday, November 23, 2016 - 12:42 pm:

Jim,

Unfortunately, the photo-size restriction makes the diagram hard to read. I'll send you the better picture by email.

The nozzle is in front of the venture, and there's just enough clearance to drill the blind hole at the factory. You should be able to snake a piece of thin steel wire through the nozzle and into the cross-chamber at the bottom of the hole.

Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Kelsey on Wednesday, November 23, 2016 - 02:24 pm:

I found the patent searching online, but could only pull up one picture, even though it says that there should be five pages.

http://pdfpiw.uspto.gov/.piw?Docid=01852343&homeurl=http%3A%2F%2Fpatft.uspto.gov %2Fnetacgi%2Fnph-Parser%3FSect1%3DPTO1%2526Sect2%3DHITOFF%2526d%3DPALL%2526p%3D1 %2526u%3D%25252Fnetahtml%25252FPTO%25252Fsrchnum.htm%2526r%3D1%2526f%3DG%2526l%3 D50%2526s1%3D1852343.PN.%2526OS%3DPN%2F1852343%2526RS%3DPN%2F1852343&PageNum=&Rt ype=&SectionNum=&idkey=NONE&Input=View+first+page


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Wednesday, November 23, 2016 - 04:40 pm:

Jim, click at "Full pages" in the LH margin, then you'll get all the drawings :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Kelsey on Wednesday, November 23, 2016 - 05:07 pm:

I went to my five inch Model T binder you have sent me that picture in the past so I was able to identify the parts. All of the passages are clear - I stuck a wire through all of them. It still is not starting any easier.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James A. Mahaffey on Wednesday, November 23, 2016 - 05:46 pm:

After cranking it with the choke handle pulled, can you detect raw gasoline in a cylinder? If not, then you are not choking. Something is either blocked or leaking air so it cannot pull a vacuum.

A healthy vacuum is required to pull gasoline out of the bowl and blow it into the top of the intake manifold. Make sure that the air-leak valve (coaxial with the choke shaft) is closing. Make sure the choke butterfly is closing.

Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By JOHN BEVARDOS on Wednesday, November 23, 2016 - 06:13 pm:

James ,
I have 2 of them. Do you know who can reproduce 2281-sx, needle on the air horn?

thanks
John


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Kelsey on Thursday, November 24, 2016 - 12:22 am:

I think I have it figured out - knock on wood...I pulled off the assembly that has the Venturi and stuck a wire through the hole. I did not notice any blockage, but that doesn't mean that something wasn't in there. The trick is to pull out the choke until you hear it fire and then push it in about a quarter of the way as you pull down the spark advance. I just got back from a shopping trip to Fred Meyer - in the rain and at night. The car drove absolutely great! From my limited experience, I would think this would be about as good as a Model T can get! Here is the pic Jim Mahaffey requested.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Kelsey on Thursday, November 24, 2016 - 08:46 am:

Jim:


One more question about the brass choke cylinder that is attached via a cotter pin to the chock rod #2283. I have seen it placed differently in two drawings. The one from Murray Fahenstock's service Bulletin has the holes in the barrel facing up when the butterfly choke is open. The CAD drawings by Martin Vowell has the holes in barrell facing to the side when the butterfly choke is open. The way the holes are aligned with the choke rod on my carburetor aligns with Martin's drawing. Which one is correct? Thanks.


- Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James A. Mahaffey on Thursday, November 24, 2016 - 10:10 am:

When in run mode, the air-vent is wide open, top and bottom. When in choke mode, there is one tiny vent hole, only on the top.

There is no way to assemble this piece wrong. If the valve cylinder is mounted upside down, then the tiny hole points down on choke, but this works just the same. The venting valve-body is open at the top and the bottom.

Looks like you need a choke spring. An L-4 spring works fine. You have to withdraw the choke butterfly plate out the bottom and slide out the shaft.

Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Tomaso - Longbranch,WA on Thursday, November 24, 2016 - 12:08 pm:

And I would remove the end of the choker spring OFF the copper gas line above the valve - not a good spot for a gas leak when the springs wears through the copper. Really should be a steel line.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Kelsey on Thursday, November 24, 2016 - 11:26 pm:

The car came with copper lines when I bought it. Did they come with steel lines from the factory?

Thanks for the advice on the spring. I bought one months ago to replace the one on the Holley. I put it on the Kingston today. The choke plate was rusted to the choke arm. A few sequences of Aerokroil freed it up.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James A. Mahaffey on Friday, November 25, 2016 - 08:23 am:

Hey, I just noticed the vacuum line coming off the intake manifold. The end of that hose must be absolutely closed (wiper off) for the choke to work.

Please post a photo of your automatic wiper!

Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Friday, November 25, 2016 - 11:12 am:

Jim - all Model T's had brass gas lines from factory. Brass is safer than copper. Steel can be a bit hard to work with.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Tomaso - Longbranch,WA on Friday, November 25, 2016 - 11:34 am:

I realized that earlier T's - pre '26-'27 had brass fuel lines - I do have a couple original "Improved Model" fuel lines - I'll have to go put a magnet to them.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Kelsey on Friday, November 25, 2016 - 02:15 pm:

Jim:

This is the closest photo of the wiper I have from the pics on my phone. It isn't an authentic Ford wiper; but, it works great and was only $2.00 at a swap meet.


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