OT.... 1914 Willys Overland questions

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: OT.... 1914 Willys Overland questions
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Hoshield; Oak Park MI on Monday, November 21, 2016 - 10:02 pm:

My wife volunteers at the Henry Ford Museum, and Greenfield Village.... She occasionally has 'duty' near a 1917 Willys Oberland Touring, and often gets asked how it shifts. I've never driven one nor even seen this one ... so I'm no authority!

0From what I've read, it's a 3 speed (2nd lever is hand brake), and has a leather cone clutch plate, similar to other non-Fords of the era. Only has 2 pedals... left is clutch and right is break? There are no levers on the steering wheel, whichni thought they all had. Maybe the museum tool off so the kids wouldn't mess with them? Photos i've seen have a couple knobbed 1/2 dials on the right side of the steering wheel. I imagine one for gas and one for soark advance?

Pleas pardon the 'phone thumb' typing!

Thanks in advance.

Dennis


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Gitts - Ferndale, WA on Monday, November 21, 2016 - 11:03 pm:

Hi Dennis,

I was at the Henry Ford last month and had my photo taken in that Overland. You're correct in saying the spark and throttle levers (and quadrants) have been removed from the steering column. They would have been attached at the center of the column above the steering wheel. I didn't pay attention to the pedals, but most likely, it had a foot feed throttle, but it would have been a smaller cast piece which partially protruded through the floor, not a modern looking gas pedal. For the transmission, they were a 3-speed normal "H" pattern shift, just like most trucks in the 60's.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Thomas Mullin on Tuesday, November 22, 2016 - 12:22 am:

While talking about other cars, I always wondered how difficult it was to switch from a semi-automatic Model T to an un-synchronized 3-speed transmission like the second Model A.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Young in Mays Landing, NJ on Tuesday, November 22, 2016 - 06:46 am:

Dennis, have your wife take you over to the locomotive shop at Greenfield and find Dave Liepelt. He's about 40 years old and knows more about Overlands than anyone else alive...except for his Dad, Don. He has a 1912 Overland Speedster among others, and is the guy who raced his model T against a Tesla from Michigan to Long Island, NY a few years ago. He loves to explain how things work!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Gitts - Ferndale, WA on Tuesday, November 22, 2016 - 09:49 am:

Thomas, not difficult at all. I switch from my T, to driving my DB (which is 3-speed, but upside down shift pattern) and then the Queen, which is 3 speed progressive (straight line) with hand throttle only (that gets alittle complicated). Once you've driven each type, you don't even think about it, it's just an automatic reaction.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Tuesday, November 22, 2016 - 10:45 am:

Tom,

My Overland shifts very easy, if you follow the rules. When you depress the clutch pedal all the way, there's a small brake pad that stops the clutch cone from spinning. This allows a very smooth shift to the next gear, up or down. However, if you get sloppy and don't depress the pedal all the way, you get stuck "between gears" and you're sunk and sometimes have to bring the car to a stop and start from scratch.

It also steers VERY easy. Really a pleasant car to drive.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Gumbinger, Kenosha, WI on Tuesday, November 22, 2016 - 01:07 pm:

Like Dave Young said above, David and Don Liepelt are two of the most knowledgable Overland owners there are. When you visit David at the Locomotive shop in Greenfield Village, just don't think that it's going to be a short visit. Allow plenty of time, as David will tell you all about them, maybe more than you thought was possible. :-)

Keith


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By charley shaver- liberal,mo. on Tuesday, November 22, 2016 - 04:40 pm:

come by my place if you want to see some good overlands!!! charley


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Hoshield; Oak Park MI on Tuesday, November 22, 2016 - 09:55 pm:

Very good, all!

Les... might yoy be able to pm me the photos you took? There is a tunnel that pm'd me asking for photos as he is working on rebuilding one.

All ekse are welcome too... i will firward them onvto him.


Thanks!

Dennis


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