Mounting clincher tires

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Mounting clincher tires
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tommy coffey on Tuesday, November 22, 2016 - 03:09 pm:

Clymers book , page 47- "Before inserting the inner tube in a clincher tire you must cut a notch in each bead to make a hole for the valve stem to come through when the beads are pressed together" WHAT ??? I've not heard that before. Explain please.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Tuesday, November 22, 2016 - 03:33 pm:

With modern clincher tires you don't always have to do this.... but sometimes you do.

The reason is pretty much as you quote above. The beads come to together and pinch the valve stem otherwise. Not always a problem when the tire beads are seated in the rim, but when the beads are squeezed together, to clear the rim during installation, the valve stem may interfere and not allow the beads to pass between the rim edges.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Val Soupios on Tuesday, November 22, 2016 - 03:41 pm:

I have seen that done on several tires and on all the old original ones. Not necessary for the new clinchers because the clincher bead is much less robust than the older ones so there is room for the valve stem. I still do it when I am using metal stems but make only a very slight notch. I think the tires back in the day were much softer and the practice was to put both sides on at the same time so it was necessary to press both sides of the tire together tightly and cutting a relief for the valve made that possible. People caution against doing it as they feel it weakened the bead but I have never had a problem.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Tuesday, November 22, 2016 - 03:46 pm:

When I've had to do it, it was only a small notch that I put in with a rat tail file.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gene Carrothers Huntington Beach on Tuesday, November 22, 2016 - 05:21 pm:

Like Jerry I've had to do a notch but ONLY in my 30 X 3's because there is a lot less room between the beads on the front tires. I've never had a problem because of the cut.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tommy coffey on Tuesday, November 22, 2016 - 05:52 pm:

The new tubes that are in the new tires on my '21 Touring have rubber stems. Both fronts are flat. The drivers side leaks down slowly , but the passenger side tube has the brass part of the stem ripped out. I took it to a local tire store to get what was a slow leak fixed. They ripped the brass inner stem out trying to pull the tube back into the rim. I am going to attempt to fix both fronts in the next few days. I have bought some new tire irons from Harbor Freight. I have some metal bolt-in stems that I will try to use. I had never heard of notching the tire beads, but will keep it in mind.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By paul iverson freeport ill. on Tuesday, November 22, 2016 - 07:40 pm:

The original 30x3's on our 16 were notched don't know about the rears they were changed 70 years ago


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Tuesday, November 22, 2016 - 07:50 pm:

I have not found a tyre, old or new, which required a notch to be cut if the two beads on the tyre were mounted in the rim at the same time when fitting the tyre. Putting the tyre on one side first, then fitting the tube and trying to get the valve stem down the hole is often difficult because the tyre bead is not seated in the rim. I have seen more than one tyre ruined because the notch cutter got too enthusiastic.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Wednesday, November 23, 2016 - 12:13 am:

The above information is correct. The beads don't come together any more, and because of that, I use flaps now. I bought a set of Firestones in the early '60s and I had to cut a V notch to get the rubber stem through. I imagine it would be the same for the metal stems. Never had a problem with tubes back then, until Lucas started making them in New Zealand.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Wednesday, November 23, 2016 - 07:26 am:

Info on how to easily mount clinchers is here:


http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/179374/256320.html?1325091009


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tommy coffey on Wednesday, November 23, 2016 - 07:35 am:

Last night I removed the damaged tube from the right front of my car. I partially demounted the tire from the rim, front side only, to remove the tube and install a metal stem. I know it is difficult to reinsert the stem through the rim with one bead already/still on the rim. I suppose that I will remove the tire and reinstall tire and tube at the same time. The only tire and tube that I have ever installed that way is bicycles. We"ll see how it goes. I will probably be eating turkey for Thanksgiving with sore fingers. I might have to watch the video on Youtube of installing a tire using a trash bag again first.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Wednesday, November 23, 2016 - 07:40 am:

You must install the tire with the partly inflated tube already installed. I don't find the trash can bag helpful, and for sure taking the wheel off the car is a complete waste of time that just doubles the amount of effort needed.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Wednesday, November 23, 2016 - 10:23 am:

I use three tire irons to get started, and a real stout rubber mallet to pound them back on.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Wednesday, November 23, 2016 - 11:14 am:

Whatever method you use, warm clinchers go on a lot easier than cold ones.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Wednesday, November 23, 2016 - 11:57 am:

I've changed all four of my tires, some more than once, and never found the need to notch the clinchers. -Initially, don't try to poke the valve more than half the way through the hole in your rim until after the tire is mounted. - Once the clinchers are locked in all the way around, you can gently bop the tire tread over the valve with your big rubber mallet. -In the case of a metal, treaded-type air-valve, you can use the little retaining nut to jack the valve out (Don't over-do this). -Inflate the tire and bop the treads real hard with your mallet, then deflate it, inflate it and repeat. -The air pressure itself will help seat the air-valve where it belongs.



In case the inner-tube is folded upon itself somewhere in the tire or pinched between the clinchers, inflating the tire, beating on the treads with a mallet, deflating and repeating will help pop it free (and after going through the knuckle-busting, cussword-inducing process of mounting a tire, beating the living daylights out of it is viscerally satisfying and good for the soul).


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tommy coffey on Thursday, November 24, 2016 - 08:57 am:

I'm getting some practice at fixing flats. Last night and the night before I removed and reinstalled the tire and tube from my '21. I tried it with the wheel still on the car. First time I had done it that way. I did not need to notch the beads on my tire. I'm liking the tire irons that I bought at Harbor Freight. I need a heavier mallet though. Back to Harbor Freight tomorrow I guess.I also need a pump to carry in the car. I've never tried a foot-operated one.Who uses one? Like it ?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Thursday, November 24, 2016 - 09:47 am:

I got a foot operated pump from Wal Mart. It works very well, it is under the back seat of which ever car I am going on tour with.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Tomaso - Longbranch,WA on Thursday, November 24, 2016 - 12:11 pm:

Ditto Royce !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tommy coffey on Friday, November 25, 2016 - 08:17 am:

My success rate appears to be 50%. One front has stayed up for 24 hours. The other has leaked down from 50 lbs that I put in it to 35 lbs. The leaker has two patches from where the local tire store pinched the tube when they worked on it. I believe I will replace that tube.


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