Family and their Ford-Photo

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Family and their Ford-Photo
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Sunday, November 27, 2016 - 11:02 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Sunday, November 27, 2016 - 11:10 pm:

Neat photo Herb. From the look of the evidence near the left rear tire, the horse that car replaced just left. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Monday, November 28, 2016 - 12:04 am:

Canadian - note left front door hinges.

1917 or early 1918 - note the horn button.

Purists should note the top boot - no fasteners.

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Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Monday, November 28, 2016 - 10:11 am:

That top boot above was adopted in 1916.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Monday, November 28, 2016 - 07:51 pm:

Herb,

Thank you for posting the picture.


Larry,

If the car was a USA produced car you probably have good documentation for the 1916 date for the top boot.

Do you also have documentation for the Canadian production indicating it was also in 1916? See below for some of the differences between USA and Canadian production.


Eric,
If the car had been a USA assembled car you are absolutely correct that the horn button on top of the steering column combined with the black radiator and the unequal windshield hinges would have been an Arp’ish 1917 to early 1918 model year car.

But because it is a Canadian car – they did not follow the USA on all items. Sometimes they were earlier such as the “one-man top” and slanted windshields. Some times later – such as getting rid of the ribbed pedals that Ford of Canada used well into the 1920s and Ford USA discontinued during 1915. The horn button is another one of those areas they did not follow the USA production. Ford of Canada continued the horn button on top of the steering column and the related push-pull light switch until they introduced the horn button on top of the steering wheel (I believe during the 1920 Canadian Model Year while others believe it was during calendar year 1920 but the 1921 model year.) To my knowledge Ford of Canada never used that combination horn and light switch introduced in the USA cars early part of 1918 model year or the later horn button only on the side of the steering wheel used to replace the combination horn & light switch.
So that would expand the date range into 1920 or 1921 depending on your belief. Gordon Sylvester’s 1919 unrestored and very original 1919 touring was featured in the Mar-Apr 2005 Model T Times. It clearly shows the same features the photo above has. I.e. USA 1915-early 1918 horn button on the top of the steering column; the Bair style top rest; oval top irons; and from memory – I don’t think it has a carriage bolt in front of the rear door.

Note: From the Jul 1922 Canadian Parts List we have:
4083X….Bair top bow holder—right ………………1917-19…….90 (cents)
4005X….Bair top bow holder—left…………….…..1917-19…….90 (cents)

I don’t know when Ford of Canada introduced the unequal length windshield hinges. That might be reflected in one of the parts listings? I know for the slant windshield and one man touring tops the Jan 1, 1925 Canadian price list of parts shows 1920 -1924 for the dates with a second one mentioned for 1924?

Based on that little bit of extra data, I would recommend expanding the date range to 1917-1919. But that we should also include we don’t know when Ford of Canada introduced the unequal length windshield hinges etc.
Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


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