Customized 1911 open runabout-Photo

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Customized 1911 open runabout-Photo
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Monday, November 28, 2016 - 03:55 am:



I wonder if this was an upgrade kit that was offered as an accessory.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank van Ekeren (Australia) on Monday, November 28, 2016 - 05:05 am:

A bit hard to tell if it is a 1911? enlarge the photo to 250% and the wheels still look to be square felloe and not much of a T cup on the oil pan, electric lights and the fuel tank looks more like a weber BBQ.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By charley shaver- liberal,mo. on Monday, November 28, 2016 - 08:02 am:

there was i co. in i think pa. that did conversions .i have a 1910 overland open roaster body that was changed to closed.there is an article in an old hcc club mag about this co.but i have so maney it would take forever to find it.ha.ha. charley


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Monday, November 28, 2016 - 08:37 am:

I would have to say that it is a 1911. The fenders and running board are unique to the 1911 torpedo and runabout. The hood looks longer as would be the 1911 torpedo and runabout. The steering column looks to be at a lower angle than a regular Ford would be from this period.
Here is another photo of a Torpedo Roadster for comparison.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Monday, November 28, 2016 - 06:36 pm:

Neat photo! And a very interesting car. I do believe it was a true 1911 open roadster before it was customized, for reasons others have mentioned. I would speculate that the car is a few years old at the time the picture was taken. The top and boot appear weathered a bit. Some differential paint fading is apparent. The electric headlamps, lack of sidelamps, and the electric horn could have been done when new, but likely were done to help update an aging car.
The cowl is particularly interesting. I can't tell what was done about the original firewall, but it must have been either cut down some, or replaced entirely. The cowl is not a simple addition. It either must have been a nice custom piece? Or was an after-market item to exactly fit this one year make and model car. It sets and appears to attach neatly onto the entire space between the firewall and the seat of the car. Only the Ford open roadster and only for 1911 would fit that piece. It appears to be a neat and perfect fit. Interesting also that it appears to use the original OR/TR windshield bracket to hold the new windshield support rod. It could be that that is all that holds the cowl down and in place other than the nice fit. (Probably some brackets and screws inside?)
It could be that such a cowl could have been a popular item for a short while. In 1911, the open Roadster was a light and sporty little roadster. However, it closely resembled many similar light and sporty runabouts made by many dozens of companies since about 1906, including the Ford model R. Within a year or two, this style was quite obsolete. While Stutz, Mercer, and numerous special cars continued to use a similar style until 1916, they were bigger cars, longer, and LOWER and gave a totally different impression of power and speed. The spindly open runabout look ended just about the time these cars were built. So a cowl to enclose the car for an updated look was an option only a year or two later.

A couple other details. The gasoline tank intrigues me. While similar to the OR/TR tank, the end of the tank does not appear to be attached with a seam around the outer end. I have seen similar (blister end) tanks (both modern and original era). I believe it was Lozier (among others) that used such a tank at that time. But I have not seen one on a Ford factory body (generally speaking). The tool box squeezed onto a small space behind the gasoline tank looks cheesy by comparison.
The wheels. I think are round felloe. The lighting, color, and angles, make it difficult to tell. But when I zoomed in close, I think I can see a change in reflections around the spokes, similar to what can be easily seen in the other TR photo.
The Pan? I think it was changed sometime in the few years after the car was originally built, and the picture taken. Again, I zoomed in close. The TR photo clearly shows how the correct early pan should look. The dips stand out much more pronounced than all the later pans with removable inspection covers. In the first photo, even at its angles, those dips should show. If that car had the early pan. The change to the inspection cover pan was in 1911, I don't recall exactly when during the year, But I think it was fairly early in calendar 1911. But, as Frank v E pointed out, the tea-cup also is too small. You can clearly see the size of it in the second TR photo. It should show very well in the first photo if the pan was the original for a 1911. The sump drain went through a couple size reductions in 1914 and 1915. That appears to be a 1914 or later pan.
It also appears that the back end of the car was dropped a couple inches. I am curious as to how they did that? (Just heated and sagged the spring a bit maybe?)

Great photos! Both of them. Thank you Herb, and all.
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


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