The DMV wants to take my original plates !

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: The DMV wants to take my original plates !
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Tuesday, November 29, 2016 - 11:27 am:

I sold my 1919 T a few weeks ago and the New York DMV wants my original 1919 NY license plates. I've gone on the website and see no provision for re-registered plates. Generally when you sell a car you have to surrender the plates to them and they get destroyed. Anyone have any experience in New York state with this?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Tuesday, November 29, 2016 - 11:40 am:

I was under the impression that you were required to store the plates at your local DMV office. They are still your property and can be transferred to another car at a later date.

See below:

https://dmv.ny.gov/learn-about-historical-and-vintage-plates


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Rogers - South of the Adirondacks on Tuesday, November 29, 2016 - 11:54 am:

Just tell the DMV clerk you want to keep the plates. I think you have to pay a dollar. I have done it many times with vintage plates in NYS.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Tuesday, November 29, 2016 - 12:29 pm:

Ha ! After locating proper truck plates (no small feat) and having them restored
(shucking out $300 for that pleasure) they could diddle MY pleasure zone before
I'd give mine up !

Did the state issue these plates to you, or did you buy them on the open market
in order to satisfy THEIR rules ? Mine fell out of State ownership when they issued
them to the original owner. 90 years, and the miracle of survivorship later, and they
would want to claim them as theirs ? I think not.

I would be warming up my "Go pound sand !" response.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Tuesday, November 29, 2016 - 12:37 pm:

Oh, I'm sorry, I already threw them away...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Derek Kiefer - Mantorville, MN on Tuesday, November 29, 2016 - 01:19 pm:

Jerry has it right. They've been lost, you just didn't realize it yet.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Adam Doleshal on Tuesday, November 29, 2016 - 01:35 pm:

Go down to your local FedEx Kinkos, UPS Store, Copy Center, or wherever you can get a color photo copy. Get a full size color copy of your plates on heavy card-stock (like business cards). Do a nice job of cutting them out. Then present them to the folks at the DMV. If you are questioned, just tell them that's what you had on your car.

The license plates that get used on picture cars on film sets are usually just printed on thin cardboard or plastic.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Brough on Tuesday, November 29, 2016 - 01:53 pm:

Every State is different and I know only NY residents can really assist you. But, here in GA, we can display the correct plate from the year of the vehicle, but have to pay for and have in our possession, a current plate. When the vehicle is sold, it is the CURRENT plate that must be surrendered, not the display plate.

Again, every state is different. Any local car clubs that might have some members who are also lawyers? Or have some experience with NY statutes?

One thing NY DMB clerks have in common with all other states is that if you call and talke to 5 different clerks, you will get 5 different answers to your question.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John C Codman on Tuesday, November 29, 2016 - 02:19 pm:

Robert Brough's last line is absolutely correct in Massachusetts.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham on Tuesday, November 29, 2016 - 02:37 pm:

That's the case in our county courthouse here in southern Idaho. It kinda pays to know which clerk is a "by the book Nazi" and which one is either reasonable, or will go to the top if there's a question. We can display year of manufacture plates in Idaho, and I've made "duplicate" plates for friends when they only had one YOM plate and wanted to display two. A good photo of the original and you can't tell the difference from five feet away.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Tuesday, November 29, 2016 - 02:50 pm:

Here in CA, which has NOTHING to do with what works in NY, technically horseless carriage plates are assigned to a vehicle and go with the vehicle. However, dumb clerks want you to surrender them--DON"T DO IT. That's not how the regulations are written. I believe (but haven't had to deal with it yet) YOM plates also transfer with the vehicle.
Jerry's solution is good, "Oh, they're lost!" except then I don't think you can re-use them.

Good luck.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Jefferson, Ohio on Tuesday, November 29, 2016 - 03:05 pm:

If you surrender the plates or tell them you lost them you may create a big future problem if you ever want to reuse them because they will assume that the plates no longer exist and reissue the number to some modern plate. CHECK FIRST ALL THE RULES AND REGULATIONS BEFORE surrendering the plates or telling them you lost them. It may be better to pay the registration fees and just keep the plates.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Tuesday, November 29, 2016 - 04:17 pm:

Just found out that you have to store them at the New York DMV ..even though they have no actual storage facility. So they look at them to be sure they are off your car ... and hand them back to you. Then you can do whatever you want with them.

My next hurdle is getting a new title for my new '23 T which has no title. I guess I register it later when I get ready for inspection.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Landry, Hudson, NH on Tuesday, November 29, 2016 - 04:50 pm:

Wow, glad I live in NH. In 40 years I've never turned any plates in. In fact, I have a whole bunch of old plates - from 3 states - from past vehicles hanging in the stairway to my basement. Rules have probably changed over time.

Also, no titles required on anything over 25 years old, although you can request one for a fee. No inspection for anything earlier than some time in the 40's.

As far as I know, CA is the only state where plates go with the vehicle.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By steven miller on Tuesday, November 29, 2016 - 05:00 pm:

Burger, Read the small print. The plate was issued at one point by the government and even though you have exclusive use, the plate remains the property of the government. This is the law around the world.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ted Dumas on Tuesday, November 29, 2016 - 05:15 pm:

Why didn't the plates go with the car when you sold it? I would think the new owner would be pleased to have them.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie Dill in Stamford, CT on Tuesday, November 29, 2016 - 05:29 pm:

In Connecticut the DMV has a simple postcard size form that's an affidavit saying you lost the plates. They will assume they are lost so if they show up will be recorded as such. Of course yours never will show up in a DMV database anymore anyway.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Spaziano, Bellflower, CA. on Tuesday, November 29, 2016 - 06:38 pm:

California treats year of manufacture plates (Y.O.M.) the same as they do personalized or "vanity" plates. These are the only form of license plates that are not required go with the vehicle when it is sold that I know of.

If you choose to sell the plates with the vehicle, the new owner must go through the process to register the vehicle with the Y.O.M. plates under their name. If you choose to keep the plates, the D.M.V. will issue a set of current issue plates to that vehicle.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By RJ Walworth, New York on Tuesday, November 29, 2016 - 08:05 pm:

Mark are you going to cancel your Car Ins? When you registered you car NYS they gave you a newer set of plates. Those are the ones you have to hand back in if you are canceling you car ins. Your vintage plates you still can keep but not put on another car until you do a proper DMV transfer them


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Lloid on Tuesday, November 29, 2016 - 08:35 pm:

Ga is easy take your old tag and buy the new plate and the link your new tag to the old plate in their data base. I just found a over priced Ga 27 plate for my roadster but they are very hard to find in the southern states for some reason. Probably people couldn't afford a car working on farm in the south compared to the guy working in a northern city with many more options for employment. Or that the only thing I can think of!! Tim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Wednesday, November 30, 2016 - 12:43 am:

Steve wrote:

"Burger, Read the small print. The plate was issued at one point
by the government and even though you have exclusive use, the
plate remains the property of the government. This is the law
around the world."

=========================

The legal team might make this argument, and I can see where
it might hold water in some ways. But there sure are a lot of people
buying and selling gov't property in this antique license plate trade !

Why, I have license plates from a number of middle eastern countries
I was deployed to. I guess that makes me an international criminal ?
Methinks that even if it would be a gov't. agency's argument or policy,
certain practicality issues make the whole idea absurd.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Derek Kiefer - Mantorville, MN on Wednesday, November 30, 2016 - 08:50 am:

What's legal isn't always right, and what's right isn't always legal.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Aldrich Orting Wa on Wednesday, November 30, 2016 - 11:58 am:

Berger:

"Ha ! After locating proper truck plates (no small feat) and having them restored (shucking out $300 for that pleasure) they could diddle MY pleasure zone before I'd give mine up !

Did the state issue these plates to you, or did you buy them on the open market in order to satisfy THEIR rules ? Mine fell out of State ownership when they issued them to the original owner. 90 years, and the miracle of survivorship later, and they
would want to claim them as theirs ? I think not.

I would be warming up my "Go pound sand !" response."

I concur.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By steven miller on Wednesday, November 30, 2016 - 12:03 pm:

Burger you are absolutely right. Too small a fish to go after but the law is in place. It allows the Police or DMV to remove a plate from an unsafe vehicle (car,truck,bus,motorcycle,etc) operating on a public roadway. I'm 100% okay with that.
Steve


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Val Soupios on Wednesday, November 30, 2016 - 12:18 pm:

I seem to recall having to pay for the plate itself in addition to the registration fee. Doesn't that mean that I bought it from the government. They have the right to control the use of the plate but that shouldn't affect your right to posses the plate. When they issue new plates, as they do periodically, they don't require you to surrender the old plate.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Landry, Hudson, NH on Wednesday, November 30, 2016 - 12:25 pm:

From the NH DMV web site: "Under New Hampshire Law it is mandatory to retain license plates from a vehicle when selling. The plates may be transferred to another vehicle or surrendered at your local DMV office."

So let's say I buy a car, but don't trade the old one in as part of the deal. Maybe I want to keep the old one on the road so people can test drive it, or whatever. I go down to the town hall, register the new car, and they hand me new plates. (acting, I suppose, as agents of the DMV) Later, I sell the old car. I guess I was supposed to go turn those plates in, but instead I just hung them up in my cellar stairway. Oh well!

No tie-in to insurance here. That's a completely separate transaction.

Both times I have moved state-to-state, I just registered the cars in the new state, and kept the old plates. I guess I'm a real scofflaw!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Wednesday, November 30, 2016 - 12:41 pm:

I suspect this hobby is full, rife, and bloated with scum, degenerates, scofflaws,
and downright n'e'er-do-wells. God knows we all drive unsafe cars ! :-)

I am quite sure there are legions of feel-good "activist" types that feel all cars
beyond a certain age should be banned from the roads, as only "new" is "good".
This extends far beyond cars. I recently had quite a row with my City inspector
over electrical standards like this. Younger guy, book trained, he could not get
his head around the idea that old gear, vastly overrated for the loads I was using
it for, was perfectly fine for the job. His book did not show such things, therefore
it must be "dangerous" and therefore "unacceptable". Just because the power
company uses the same thing on their poles to light up the whole area does not
mean it can handle my few household circuits !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Duffy on Sunday, December 18, 2016 - 12:45 pm:

I have been through this several times:
When cancelling the registration, you pay the $1 surrender fee and show them the plates, dmv allows you to keep them, you can reuse them at a later date (same year car). Or give/sell to another (there may be a wait time until another person can use them). The plates belong to you. I think the officiall procedure says plates stored at dmv office, but I don't think the dmv wants to be bothered.
This is what I have experienced at the local dmv in NY........


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Duffy on Sunday, December 18, 2016 - 12:54 pm:

From the nys dmv website:


"The policy to store vehicle plates is different in each office. Ask your local DMV office about the storage policy in that office."


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By george house . . .caldwell county, TX on Sunday, December 18, 2016 - 01:44 pm:

"Store them".....yeah, RIGHT......they want to display them as trophies on some supervisor's office wall.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John C Codman on Sunday, December 18, 2016 - 01:45 pm:

In Massachusetts, the plates go with the owner (of the registration) not the car. If your registration expires, you can use the plates to decorate your garage. If you cancel it before the expiration date, you have to give the plates back. Once your registration expires, the state can and will reissue the number. I don't believe that the fact that a specific number is currently issued would prevent you from using it on a YOM plate. The number on my T's YOM Mass. plate is "normal" enough that I'm sure that there is a modern plate with the same number.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Sunday, December 18, 2016 - 02:33 pm:

I believe most states allow a plate to be used as YOM only if that number isn't on another currently registered vehicle. That's been my experience in California and Kansas. It makes sense not to have two vehicles with the same number on their plates.


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