Roller thrust washers

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Roller thrust washers
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Corey Walker, Brownsboro TX on Tuesday, November 29, 2016 - 10:15 pm:

I've never heard mention on anybody using them. Looks like a lot of extra little pieces to come apart. I was just wondering how you get them right clearance wise.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Tuesday, November 29, 2016 - 11:20 pm:

I agree it sounds like a superfluous complication. Something else to go wrong. I don't know how or if they're adjustable.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Tuesday, November 29, 2016 - 11:20 pm:

Why do you think complicating the thrust washers serves any purpose?
Keep It Simple Sonny!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Wednesday, November 30, 2016 - 12:59 am:

I think it is just looking for a solution, where there is no problem.
I have heard of them failing, into many little pieces. I have never heard of a bronze thrust washer failing. I know some people have used the needle bearing roller thrust washers and not had a problem with them. They MAY reduce drive-line drag maybe one percent. Is the risk of failure really worth it?
I did not think so forty years ago when I first heard of them. And my opinion has not changed since (at least on this item).

Still, a good question.
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Eviston on Wednesday, November 30, 2016 - 01:58 am:

I have an analogy here. This is based on memory that may have some details wrong, but here's the jist.
The Ford C-6 transmission is one of the best automatic transmissions ever built. Even in applications like F-350 4x4 dualy diesel trucks they held up well. Farmers that exceeded the GVWR by 50% regularly did not have problems.
For, I think, '91 model year, the C-6 was modified with the addition of overdrive. Also, there were some highly touted friction reducing modifications.One of these was neat little radial roller bearings instead of the previous plain washers. My first reaction to this was, I hope this works better than the roller and ball bearing aftermarket T thrust washers.
Well, guess what. So now when these trucks were overloaded or run in overdrive when they should have been locked out of overdrive while pulling long grades were getting hotter than hell, shelling out those cute little bearings. Chunks of rollers all... through...the damn transmission.
During this time I was a F-L-M dealer. I took the brunt of the abuse from my customers over this. I had a good clientele of farmers with livestock trailers. Guys that delivered travel trailers. Boats.And so forth. Well would replace transmissions under warranty. The supposedly improved unit wasted no time in going to hell, also.
We even put C-6s in some of them. Not as simple as it sounds, as the new transmission was electronically controlled. No roller or ball bearing T thrust washers for me.
I had to get this off my chest, for fear if I can get back to sleep, Ill have a damn nightmare involving this.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Alan George Long on Wednesday, November 30, 2016 - 06:06 am:

Jim, agree with your C6 story. A real great auto in the old days and no ball, needle or roller bearings. The same applies to Model T's in my opinion

Alan in Western Australia


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Wednesday, November 30, 2016 - 07:53 am:

I remember my old 1933 Plymouth coupe had axle nuts that were specific to left and right because the engineers supposed they might be more secure. Eventually they figured out that other make cars didn't have any trouble with losing wheels.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By keith g barrier Savannah Tn. on Wednesday, November 30, 2016 - 07:53 am:

I know of a set that has over 150 k on them of which 40 k I put on my self. Advantages are plug and play with no time consuming fitting. My results only, I am not trying to promote or disavow this product. Just giving a statement as to my results. Everyone can come to their own conclusions, I only post here as to my own experience or lack there of. KGB


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim on Wednesday, November 30, 2016 - 11:33 am:

I've put them in many cars. Love them. Sometimes you have to mix the old "races" (the steel plates) with the ones that come in the kit to get the right pre-load. Less friction, I have modern bearings end to end in my car and yes, the benefit of each bearings contribution to how easy it rolls free adds up. I can push it on the level with one finger.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By R.V. Anderson on Wednesday, November 30, 2016 - 02:24 pm:

I have run them in my '14 for 11 years. No problems, and the rear axle is nice and quiet.


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