OT - Age of Your Car

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: OT - Age of Your Car
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Monday, December 05, 2016 - 11:36 am:

Our local TV station just aired a piece on the average age of cars driven in the U.S. saying our cars average 9.6 years old. Further, this is the oldest average in many years, maybe ever.

One commentator said this is good for the auto industry as it stimulates the sale of parts and repairs. Another said driving a 10 year old car is way out of date technologically, "like calling someone on a rotary phone".

My questions are:

1. What'swrong with a rotary phone?
2. What does this say about us?

:-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Monday, December 05, 2016 - 12:05 pm:

Dear Henry,

If I had a dime for every time someone has let me know how strange I am, I could
buy ANY and ALL the cars my little heart desired AND a lavish place to rival Leno's
in which to keep them snug as bugs. Now, if you would like to lie to me, go ahead
and say it hasn't been the same for you ! :-)

Oddball Extraordinaire, and damned proud of it ! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Rogers - South of the Adirondacks on Monday, December 05, 2016 - 12:15 pm:

This is an example of Liberalism. It is absolutely ridiculous for anyone to state that a 10 year old car is way out if date technologically. What is disturbing is that a whole lot of people believe these silly reports when they hear them.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham on Monday, December 05, 2016 - 12:17 pm:

Burger, "birds of a feather" I guess. I find similar attitudes among all the oddballs I socialize with, back country horsemen, cowboy action shooters (some, not all) and of course lovers of Model Ts and very old cars.

It's the "pod people" who worry me . . .


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ted Dumas on Monday, December 05, 2016 - 12:20 pm:

My truck is 17 years old and has 370,000 miles. I am 78 so I guess I am more out of date than my truck but we both keep right on going.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James G Fisher III Peachtree City, GA on Monday, December 05, 2016 - 12:23 pm:

My everyday vehicle is 46 years old. This morning on the way to meeting I had to put the eight track in my coat to warm it up before I could play it. ( who doesn't love a little Ringo Starr ). I do have rotary phones but I have no phone line going to the house. I like my cell phone. I'm only part luddite. The older I get the more old fashion I become...:-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Monday, December 05, 2016 - 12:27 pm:

My current modern car is eight years old, a Camry bought a couple of years ago when my twenty-year-old Camry started going expensively south on me. I'll drive it until it starts going bad, and get something else "pre-enjoyed".


The only car I ever bought new. It's currently on my list of future projects.


Radio and phone in my living room.

Oddball.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By thomas elliott nw pa on Monday, December 05, 2016 - 12:30 pm:

This is "liberalism??????????" Just the opposite! My daily driver is 7+ years old, has 53000 miles, but I prefer my 1965 Mustang, no I don't have a cell phone! (I do love the PC !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Walter Higgins on Monday, December 05, 2016 - 12:31 pm:

There are probably two contributors. One is that many makes of cars run reliably for so much longer now than ever before. The other is an economy that still hasn't recovered and people are stretching things to their limit. On the whole, Americans have always loved their new cars. There's really not much loyalty to keep old stuff going when they can afford to do otherwise.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Monday, December 05, 2016 - 12:32 pm:

Who here isn't totally aggravated when our phone or comptrometer demands
we install the updates, and then the #@! thing won't work nice and easy like it
did before ??? It is like the T stops in the middle of the street and makes us install
square wheels and tires before proceeding !

Some things are just fine the way they were .... *sigh* :-)

My daily driver is 30 years old, and the rest are 50-90 years old. The shop is
purposely filled with old tools and "stuff". There will be no vinyl siding in my life - EVER !!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Kelsey on Monday, December 05, 2016 - 12:36 pm:

My Corolla is 2005 with 120,000 miles on it and our 2005 Expedition has 84,000. The Corolla has had a few problems, the worst is the belt tensioner, which has had to be replaced three times. I am not sure that I will go with a Toyota again. The last Corolla I has was a brand new 2002 and the engine pinged, along with poor gas mileage.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Monday, December 05, 2016 - 12:37 pm:

Walter,

Interesting that you cited both reasons for the "old car" syndrome that were identified in the report. Longer lasting cars and longer loans to keep monthly payments down were offered up as the primary reasons.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Val Soupios on Monday, December 05, 2016 - 12:49 pm:

How are they calculating that statistic. If they are counting registered vehicles including our collector cars that would make their number bogus. I live in Florida and I can tell you there are not too many 10 year old cars running around. Seems like everyone is driving something new down here.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Monday, December 05, 2016 - 12:53 pm:

Ours average 48 years old.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Monday, December 05, 2016 - 01:05 pm:

My youngest vehicle is 10 years old. I won't buy a new one ever again (the last new one I bought was in the shop enough that Chrysler had to buy it back under the lemon law). I do have a rotary phone, you can't make calls on it but you can receive them, when caller id tells me that this may be an unwanted call I answer it on that phone then when they say "please press 1 to talk to a live operator" I dial 1 there is a click, this usually happens 3 or 4 times before the computer transfers me to a person. I then request to make a person to person call to a James Smartbutt.. then I sit back and try not to giggle like a little girl


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Zachary Dillinger - Charlotte, MI on Monday, December 05, 2016 - 01:50 pm:

It ain't "liberalism", it's mass consumerism. Two very different things.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Monday, December 05, 2016 - 01:55 pm:

Mine average 57.4 years old.
Before I sold the 25 TT, it was 63.0.

These modern-is-best sales spinners would paint me as a total whack job.

Don't get me started on the fun one can have with unwanted phone callers ! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Derek Kiefer - Mantorville, MN on Monday, December 05, 2016 - 02:11 pm:

6 years old, and almost time to trade in before this gets worse.



In MN you either drive new vehicles or you drive rusty vehicles.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Monday, December 05, 2016 - 02:18 pm:

Hmm, My "New" truck is now 12 years old, my wife's car is 14 years old, with a brand new engine in it (thanks to the forum members!) as at 220K the original went south (it was going south at 50K miles, but I didn't realize it) and we have no plans for an upgrade--then there's the '53 P/U, the Fords; '30, '26,'25,'16 and one DB at '16. And only two drivers!! (And we won't go into their ages!)
And yes, I have two wall dial phones here, in my shop and train room; they work, so why replace them? Cell phones??? Here??? No Coverage! Even my GPS can't find a satellite here!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John C Codman on Monday, December 05, 2016 - 02:36 pm:

My pickup is 30, our two Hemi Dodge Magnums are 11, my wife's Chrysler minivan is 4, and my T is 89. Avg = 29. I guess that we have blown the stats!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Monday, December 05, 2016 - 02:54 pm:

I have three cars, a '24, a '71, and a 2007.

Average age of the three is just under 49. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Monday, December 05, 2016 - 02:58 pm:

My cars are too numerous to average. I don't think it's a problem as long as everyone still has enough to eat right?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allen Banks on Monday, December 05, 2016 - 03:10 pm:

Another thought is how many models there are to choose from! Back in the 50s for example, how many Ford models were there? Not many. Today,...I can't keep them straight! And they seem to only stay around a decade or less, then a new model comes out. But back to your question, the consumer seems to demand the latest and greatest thing which makes phones, cars etc. obsolete and cost prohibitive to maintain so even though there is nothing wrong with the rotary phone, it doesn't make sense to keep it around.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Monday, December 05, 2016 - 03:13 pm:

I literally do not own a vehicle built in this century! Only my Cub Cadet/Yanmar sub-compact tractor was built in this century. Fine with me. I always refer to modern cars as being "boring", and the two modern's that I do have, a '94 T-bird and '97 F-150 are quickly headed out of that category! Couple more years and they'll at least be "classic". Not as fun as vintage, but maybe not so "boring"...ha ha.

Here's the P/U...can't find my T-bird pics. Pic taken two years ago..still looks just as good.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dean Kiefer - Adams, MN on Monday, December 05, 2016 - 05:08 pm:

My newest car is a 04' and I do have an operating rotary phone. It is a pay phone in a phone booth. I had the phone booth given to me and my wife bought me the pay phone for my birthday. The grandkids love it. They go in it and call there parents cell phones.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By gary hammond on Monday, December 05, 2016 - 05:33 pm:

I bought a new car in '12, right before I retired. That's it for us....the Jeep will probably outlast me, it's 9 years old. The bride is easy on a car so it should be my last one I hope.lol


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Fischer - Arroyo Grande, CA on Monday, December 05, 2016 - 06:16 pm:

My two daily drivers are a 93 and an 85. Average age 27 years. Then there's the 53 Merc, 31 Ford, and 12 Ford.

A few years ago both daily drivers were out of commission at the same time. So I was driving the '53. Starter bendix broke (12V on 6V starter) on the Merc, so the Model A became my front line vehicle for a couple of days. You can always count on a Model A to get you there.

My kids keep bugging me to get a "new" car. They make a somewhat valid claim that newer cars offer more crash safety. Maybe so. But with my kind of luck, the air bags probably wouldn't work anyhow.

Dick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Corey Walker, Brownsboro TX on Monday, December 05, 2016 - 06:19 pm:

my newest car is an 02. That 30 mpg is the only reason why. I've been trying to fix the heater today and it's a pain to work on a car where everything is plastic. All the pieces break and can't find a place to ground anything. My truck is a 76. It gets about 10mpg but it will keep you warm. People probably keep their cars because new ones cost too much. My house and an acre of land cost 1/2 of what a new car costs. You get more back for a rebate than I've ever paid for a car. For the 4 cars that I drive the average age is 57.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham on Monday, December 05, 2016 - 06:54 pm:

Average age of our fleet is 55


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Monday, December 05, 2016 - 06:55 pm:

Corey,

Your comment that, "It gets around 10 mpg..." Reminds me of a conversation I had with my dad several years ago. He had a 1968 F-250 with a 390 cu. in. engine and a granny 4 speed. That darn thing got 10 mpg going uphill fully loaded as well as downhill empty. It didn't seem to make much difference.

Anyway, one day he said, "I'm going to buy a new truck." I said "Why?" He said, "That darn thing burns too much gas. I can get a new truck that will get double the mpg."

I said, "How many miles a year do you put on that ol' Ford?" He said, "Probably about 2,000." So I said, "OK. So you're spending about $400 per year on gas (it was about $2 a gallon at that time). You're gonna buy a truck that will cut that in half to about $200 per year, saving $200 per year. The new truck you want costs about $40,000. You'll be around 280 years old by the time you pay for the truck with gas savings. If you want a truck, go buy it and spare me the baloney."

He did, and loved it. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham on Monday, December 05, 2016 - 07:07 pm:

I had a '67 that fit that description. Sorry to say after 45 years and two engine rebuilds she was plumb wore out, or I'd have her still. It would make about four of the pickup that replaced it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Walter Higgins on Monday, December 05, 2016 - 07:15 pm:

I didn't see the report Henry, but I'm not surprised. Longer payments aren't quite what I was saying, though along the same vein. For awhile now we have been a society where "how much is the payment?" takes precedent over "how much does it cost?".

With respect to new cars, something to the tune of about 30% of them are leased, which also tends to get the payment down. Just like in your story above, it's hard for me to understand all the people I know that "can't afford" $2,000 a year in repair bills, but yet they have about $5,000 at their disposal for lease payments.

(Message edited by WMH on December 05, 2016)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Carnegie Spokane, WA on Monday, December 05, 2016 - 07:46 pm:

My newest rig is 16 years old. My average is 69.75 years old.

I would also like to go on record as to saying that I think Burger is strange. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Monday, December 05, 2016 - 09:13 pm:

That's "MISTER Strange" to you, Carnegie ! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Monday, December 05, 2016 - 09:20 pm:

I thought I was "mister Strange"! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Carnegie Spokane, WA on Monday, December 05, 2016 - 10:47 pm:

Burger, I'll give you your dime Tuesday night. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Monday, December 05, 2016 - 11:10 pm:

Average age of our six vehicles 2 modern and 4 T's is 68.3 years.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John C Codman on Monday, December 05, 2016 - 11:59 pm:

With 340 HP and the speed chip-limited to 130 mph, the best fuel economy ever achieved at 28.5 MPG at a cruise-control sustained 79 MPH, my 2005 Dodge magnum RT is anything but boring. I love it (well enough that we have two of them).


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marv Konrad (Green Bay Area) on Tuesday, December 06, 2016 - 12:11 am:

'Technologically Temperamental' am I!
Average age of our four is 55 model years...
The '97 S-10/4-banger/manual (bought new) has 254K, and wife's 2000 Impala has 243K. I'm too old to have car payments or pay new car insurance rates.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Schedler, Sacramento on Tuesday, December 06, 2016 - 01:10 am:

11 GC Jeep. 5.
25 Ford. 91
23 Ford. 93
24 Ford. 92
76 Lincoln. 20

301 divided by 5 = 60.2 years old.

Lincoln is still like new


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jason Given - St. Paul, MN on Tuesday, December 06, 2016 - 05:57 am:

my everyday driver is a 2000 Chevy Cavalier my pickup 2007 and then the T 1926. The wife doesn't like to drive so not a lot of miles go on the vehicles. I'll have replace the Cavalier soon as its starting act abd show it's age.

average age is; 38 1/3 years.

as for rotary phones up until we moved I had two of them working in the house; new house no phones.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Tuesday, December 06, 2016 - 12:46 pm:

A 2001, '65, 5 pre '15's 3 20's =
81.7
Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Walt Berdan, Bellevue, WA on Tuesday, December 06, 2016 - 01:40 pm:

Three this century
'13 Motorhome
'09 Nissan replaced a great '98 Accord that was totaled, both nice cars.
'06 Silverado doing just fine thank you.

Three from the last
'60 Volvo PV544
'26 Coupe
'18 Speedster

Don't plan to replace any of them. Said that about the Accord too but a distracted driver in a Suburban took care of that.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jesse L. Ashcraft on Thursday, December 08, 2016 - 11:48 am:

>>>What does this say about us?<<<

When I bought my first cell phone, I tried to find one with a rotary dial. They don't exist!

I'll bet you a dollar and a doughnut that local car dealers advertise on that news broadcast and what you saw was an advertisement posing as news. The mechanism is called vertical integration and they're trying to sell you on a marketing meme called planned obsolescence. Obey and consume!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John C Codman on Thursday, December 08, 2016 - 03:23 pm:

Kinda depends on your definition of "planned obsolescence," In my bedroom for years I had an ancient RCA console radio. It had about 10 huge vacuum tubes in two chassis, and a 10-inch electrodynamic speaker. It used huge amounts of electricity, took a full minute to warm up, and was AM only. It used up about the same space as a spinet piano. Today I have a small Bose AM/FM/CD player that sounds just as good (in reality better), uses less then a tenth of the electricity of the old RCA, and occupies a very small portion of a shelf. I'll never love it; with it's little plastic case, it's certainly not a beautiful piece of furniture, but by any objective measure the Bose is better in every respect.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By ALAN FAIRCLOUGH from Houston, TEXAS on Thursday, December 08, 2016 - 03:45 pm:

What has happened is that for years the american auto industry had almost 100% of the market. They came to the conclusion that people would swap their car for a new one about every three to five years. They made cars so they would not last long because most people would trade it in when the ashtray got full.
Then came the japanese and penetrated the market with a Honda CVC and Toyota with Corollas that were built like battleships and made to last fifteen to twenty years. Later Hyundai with a car that had a 10 year factory warranty. Subaru with excellent products. It took decades for people to figure out that they were better cars and the american auto industry spent fortunes in advertising but not much in making their products longer lasting. Finally, around 2000 they found they had to measure up and quality improved considerably. Although they still have to have new alternators, water pumps etc, replaced regularly, they do hold up better than they used to. People are driving their cars longer because they can.
However, I still miss the smooth ride my chevrolet Caprice had... until it has 120.000 miles and became junk.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eric Hylen- Central Minnesota on Friday, December 09, 2016 - 01:09 am:

Well, you guys convinced me that I've got too many modern vehicles. I have three cars that are over 100 years old and the average age of all my cars and motorcycles is still only 55 years. I guess I need to pick up another old car or two.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Friday, December 09, 2016 - 03:16 am:

"08 Mazda Miata
'08 Ford F-150
'29 Model A Ford Briggs Town Sedan
'27 Model T Ford Depot Hack
'26 Model T Ford Touring
'23 Model T Ford Roadster Pickup
'23 Model T Ford Roadster

Average age - 67 years old


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Friday, December 09, 2016 - 03:20 am:

Hmmm,.....Always wanted a nice clean '50 Ford Club Coupe with flathead V8 and overdrive. I should look for one of those as it would be (about) 67 years old and I could call it my "average" car. (Wonder if my social director/financial advisor would give me her "official okey-dokey" on that one!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Friday, December 09, 2016 - 03:24 am:

One more thing, and then I'll "shut-up". I'm waiting for Dan Kellicut to list all of his fleet but then he's probably STILL trying to compile the list! (:^)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Skyler Kimball on Friday, December 09, 2016 - 11:17 am:

My only car is a 1916 T!

I have not gotten my license yet, but the only car I know how to drive is a Model T.

Modern cars seem difficult to me, but soon I need to change my form of transportation before I go to drivers ed!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter Adey on Friday, December 09, 2016 - 11:27 am:

That is funny Skyler - I could imagine the drivers ed instructor freaking out when you start stepping on peddles to reverse into a parallel parking spot!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Friday, December 09, 2016 - 12:15 pm:

I would LOVE to show up for my driver's test in the TT !!!

It could go one of two ways and both would be fun or funny. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Skyler Kimball on Friday, December 09, 2016 - 01:14 pm:

Yes, it would be very funny, especially due to the "Original paint!"


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Friday, December 09, 2016 - 01:25 pm:

Burger; Go for the CDL in the TT then when the examiner ask you to Pass another vehicle...Laugh manically and ask DO WHAT!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Friday, December 09, 2016 - 02:26 pm:

Skyler,
Paint??? Paint???? We don' neeed no stinkin' paint!!
:-)
The fun part would be using the turn signals!!!! Heh heh heh--I actually had to do that once in my Model A when I went through a "roadside mandatory safety test"--this was something CA tried for a year or so back in '71. Officer asked for a right turn signal; I held up my arm, and he was looking for a light somewhere to blink, then looked up at me and said, ". . . OH!" and checked it off his sheet. The other kids couldn't believe my beat-up A had a "Passed" sticker on the windshield.
My A in '71


Us in Barney (last year)


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