Old Photo - "Good Roads" Boston Springfield American Tar Co. Road Paving Scene 1915

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Old Photo - "Good Roads" Boston Springfield American Tar Co. Road Paving Scene 1915
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Thursday, December 08, 2016 - 09:17 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Thursday, December 08, 2016 - 12:52 pm:

Back when things were done right.

I see a new race division for the Montana 500 !!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Matthiesen on Thursday, December 08, 2016 - 03:25 pm:

Very interesting picture of road oiling in 1915. Notice that it looks like the front wheel of the roller has been chained to keep it going straight. Also how about doing the job of standing on the little platform and adjusting the spray bar to get the correct spread rate.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Humphrey on Thursday, December 08, 2016 - 03:40 pm:

Also notice.... Even then, they had someone just standing around. Kind of like the shovel leaners we have now....just no shovel to lean on......


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Hagerty on Thursday, December 08, 2016 - 03:42 pm:

Kevin,
The chain(s) you refer to are what steers the rig. The end of the steering wheel shaft has a worm gear that in turn rotates a crosswise shaft with a 'spool' on each end. The chain on each side wraps on these spools. Interestingly, I have a friend who owns a 'few' steam traction engines. One of which is a genuine roller virtually identical to the one pictured here. It started life with the New York State highway dept. I don't recall what year it is, I think early teens. Quite a nice toy!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Thursday, December 08, 2016 - 03:43 pm:

The chain is actually part of the steering mechanism.

Fairly common on early rollers and steam tractors, etc. The chain is usually attached to and wrapped around shaft or worm gear.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Jefferson, Ohio on Thursday, December 08, 2016 - 04:16 pm:

I can just hear the stones beating off the underside of the fenders as the stones stick to the tires from the fresh oil.

Another great view into the past.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Matthiesen on Thursday, December 08, 2016 - 04:16 pm:

David & Erik thanks for the info on the steering. I would think the standing around guy works for the road department and is checking the oil spread rate and the guy on the platform works for the paving company.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Thursday, December 08, 2016 - 05:04 pm:

If one reads the caption it say's American Tar CO and there is a hose to the tank with live steam from the engine so i doubt if its oil.The engine is hot,the tank is hot,the tar is hot and 101 years later it's still a Nasty Stinky job!! Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Eubanks, Powell, TN on Thursday, December 08, 2016 - 05:17 pm:

You got it Bud, that is the way lots of county roads were built and long as it was cold, the pavement stayed together and did not wash out. That tar was a good binder.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Matthiesen on Thursday, December 08, 2016 - 05:41 pm:

OK yes it is road tar, the point is the guy standing is checking the work being done.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Thursday, December 08, 2016 - 05:58 pm:

Jim,It's been too long since we were riding in the 1914!!!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Gitts - Ferndale, WA on Thursday, December 08, 2016 - 08:29 pm:

The steam roller is a Buffalo-Springfield.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Lloid on Thursday, December 08, 2016 - 09:11 pm:

Wouldn't want to be the guy adjusting the spray all day. Tim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Thursday, December 08, 2016 - 09:32 pm:

Let's brighten it up and take a closer look.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Sullivan on Friday, December 09, 2016 - 02:12 pm:

Notice the scrapers on the roller wheels, just as in modern days, (keeps from tracking rocks) a necessary thing, then as now. Dave in Bellingham wa


Add a Message


This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Username:  
Password:

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration