Timing Gear Considerations

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Timing Gear Considerations
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Thursday, December 08, 2016 - 09:47 pm:

A current topic of discussion on the forum right now concerns timing gears,...specifically, the fiber timing gear as opposed to various metal types. That discussion raises a question in my mind that probably isn't important, but, perhaps interesting to Model T guys more knowledgable than me, especially "engineer types" like Chaffins or Bill Stipe. Some "conjecture" here on my part, but maybe worth considering:

I would not consider using a fiber timing gear when various types of metal gears are available. However, it is interesting that some have had good luck with fiber gears, and some have not. Also, some complain that some metal timing gears are "noisy" and some do not complain of noise at all. I believe there may be a reason for noisy metal, or, stripped fiber gears that nobody considers:

I firmly believe that there is a major difference in the "running characteristics" of a camshaft in a four cylinder engine as opposed to a 6 cyl. or 8 cyl. engine. By the way, I realize that I am now getting into things that would require a mechanical engineer (which I am certainly not) to analyze. However, I think a 6 cyl. engine or 8 cyl. engine camshaft will run a lot smoother than that of a 4 cyl. engine camshaft. That is because the 4 cyl. engine camshaft will tend to "pulsate" at certain critical speeds (rpm) due to valve spring pressure from only 8 valves, as opposed to 12 or 16 valves in the 6 or 8 cyl. engines, whereas the 6 or 8 cyl. camshaft runs smoother with less (if any) pulsatations.

Having said all that (and I don't think I could say it twice!) I'm wondering how much difference it makes as far as either running a generator, or, as in the earlier T's, NOT running a generator. My thought here is that running a generator might just provide a constant load that would tend to smooth out the camshaft pulsations and prevent gear lash at critical rpm's in a 4 cyl. Model T engine.

In other words (and as usual for me, too many words) there are those who would blame a stripped fiber timing gear, or, noisy metal gear, on the added load of a generator, and I'm saying that running a generator with it's added constant load might just be easier on the fiber timing gear and cause less noise from a metal gear due to LESS gear lash at critical rpm's.

Not sure if this makes sense or not, but again, I'm wondering what an "engineer" might think,.....??? FWIW,.....harold


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