Wire Wheel repair on my '26 Roadster

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Wire Wheel repair on my '26 Roadster
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Markus Huether - Germany on Friday, December 09, 2016 - 12:25 pm:

Hi, i started my winter project.
My first work is the restoration from the wire wheels. I have one wheel with a lot of rust holes.
Is there a way to repair this wheel??

Wire Wheel with rust holes

Thanks
Markus


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Friday, December 09, 2016 - 01:53 pm:

Sadly, NO, the rust is also on the inside of the rolled edge, so you have no way of knowing how much metal is really there. It's a shame, as the outside looks nice and smooth.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Robison on Friday, December 09, 2016 - 02:05 pm:

Yes, I think it could be saved. Remove the rim, and replace it with another.

1) Remove each spoke from the rim. (drilling the spot weld)

2)Do the same procedure to a 21" Model A wheel

3)Weld the model A rim to each of the Model T Spokes.

4)Straighten the wheel

5)Clean the welds

6)paint and enjoy

This may not be practical for you, but I have seen this done, and it can work with lots and lots of patience.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ted Dumas on Friday, December 09, 2016 - 02:50 pm:

You could chip it out and form a piece of tubing, slip it on the channel you opened up and braze or weld it in place.

It most likely would be more practical to get another wheel from Tackett Brothers in England.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Friday, December 09, 2016 - 10:22 pm:

The biggest problem with any repair to the rims on wire wheel is keeping the finished wheel somewhere near balanced. Mike's suggestion would work but will take a lot of work. When I have found broken welds at the rim on T wire wheels, I have drilled out the rim where it meets the spoke, and then welded through the hole onto the spoke. This will leave the wheel with the original appearance, without any visible weld and nothing on the outside to re-finish.

Hope this helps somebody.
Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Daron - Brownsburg IN on Friday, December 09, 2016 - 10:47 pm:

I have repaired rims like the one shown with steel strips I bent and welded in.I finished off the insides with a 4 inch grinder and they have held up well for 10+ YEARS now. A lot of work,but worthwhile.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Saturday, December 10, 2016 - 05:59 pm:

Jack, your solution is fine for straight-sided rims, but these rims are rolled over sides, and they can have very thin & weak spots on the inside of that rolled area that one cannot see.
I didn't realize when I first posted that Markus is in Germany, where wheels are probably not very easy to find.
Looking at Markus' pictures, it does look like the rust is just where the tire was against the metal, what one can see of the inside of the rolled area looks very nice., so maybe it can be saved by careful metal shaping and welding. Here in the states, it's much cheaper to find a good wheel, even at "top dollar" prices.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tim moore, "Island City" MI on Saturday, December 10, 2016 - 07:33 pm:

I have fixed them with braze and they take it really well but that is such a large area it is going to be heavy and out of ballance. Looks like a really nice wheel, if you can't replace it could you find another wheel that is bad and cut out a section of the bead and mig or tig it in? That would be much easier and faster (and better finishing) than tube or metal because you already have the profile and radius. I don't think you would have to go to the outside, just cut the edge at the top of the rim when it sits upright in the running position.

That is a project I would have fun with and a junk wheel should be cheap, all you need is a section from either side and should go quick. You can fix that wheel right up nice if you can find a donor that only has one good section to cut out a little bit of the bead.

Good luck,

Tim Moore


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Markus Huether - Germany on Sunday, December 11, 2016 - 11:41 am:

Thank's for the help.
I will try to get an old wheel to cut out the section and replace it on my wheel.

Markus


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