Old Photo - "Stop Your Motor, No smoking"

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Old Photo - "Stop Your Motor, No smoking"
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Wednesday, December 14, 2016 - 09:05 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Wednesday, December 14, 2016 - 09:35 am:

It looks like he's going to add a quart of oil to that T in his white uniform and bow tie. I love it! Boy, have things changed.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Wednesday, December 14, 2016 - 09:36 am:

Problem is, my motor's ALWAYS running! ha ha. ;)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stephen, South Texas on Wednesday, December 14, 2016 - 09:27 pm:

Looks like he's making a milkshake.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Humphrey on Wednesday, December 14, 2016 - 09:33 pm:

Photoshop... mixing the gas station with the guy who worked the malt shop soda fountain ??/
Well Stephen gave me the idea..LOL


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan B on Wednesday, December 14, 2016 - 09:37 pm:

One of the best ones yet.

I imagine keeping that uniform looking white was a job in itself. They certainly had pride back then.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Aaron Griffey, Hayward Ca. on Wednesday, December 14, 2016 - 11:07 pm:

When I got out of high school in '55 I worked as a mechanic in a busy gas station .
The boss wore a bow tie every day, summer and winter.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Warren Henderson, Dunbarton, NH on Thursday, December 15, 2016 - 07:34 am:

Back in the early fifties, when I was maybe 12, I would go to the local gas station on Route 2 in Lexington, Mass and study the young (but a few years older than I) guys who worked at Mr. Stamer’s Mobil (my dad called him by his first name, Chet). They would sit by the garage doors and when a car drove in, jump up and run to the car, clean the windshield, ask if they could check the oil and battery, before they asked if they wanted a fill-up. “Those were the days”, if only we could hear the bell ring again as the vehicles rolled over that rubber hose, that run across the station’s driveway!!!!

Happy motoring,

Warren


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Everett on Thursday, December 15, 2016 - 08:11 am:

Warren, your mentioning the bell in your post triggered a memory. In the summer of '72, I "waited on the front" of a fairly large ESSO station in Memphis.

Near the end of the summer, we received new signs, "Exxon", that went onto the pumps, and the building.

This was the tailing out of the era where full-service reigned, and with a minimum purchase of 8 gallons, we gave the driver a choice of something free from a plethora of stuff, most of which had the ESSO logo, and, of course, The smiling Tiger. Children in the car would sometimes clamor, "We want a tiger in our tank!", and I'd give them the tiger-tail for the gas cap cover.

The ringing bell, signifying that a customer was pulling up, sent us out in a minimum of two-man teams, sometimes three men.

We were taught to smile, and greet the customer with "Fill it with Extra?"

That was a good summer. I didn't realize I sometimes miss that bell; thanks for the post, Warren.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Thursday, December 15, 2016 - 08:46 am:

That darn bell! My first real Summer job was working at the local Firestone store. I was 16 years old. I sorted tires, assembled bicycles, cleaned, swept and anything else they could find for me. Several dozen times throughout the day the "Bell" would chime and I dropped what I was doing to go out and pump gas, check oil, wash windshield and the usual drill.
At home, the first few nights the bell would go off in my head just about when I drifted back to sleep.
I spent most of my summer wages on a set of Firestone 30 x 3 1/2's. My discount evaporated and they came to $64 a piece. (1964) Wards Riversides were half that much. What hurt is they didn't say "Non Skid" on them as I had hoped.
I still have those four Firestones. 2 or 3 are on my coupe still holding air. Also a set of Riversides that Rich Bingham bought about that time that still work fine with less tread.
We didn't take breaks in those days and I thought it was hard work until the next Summer when I worked for a farmer. We city kids had it easy.
Still, the youngsters today that work that hard seem to do it out of sight.
The boss and managers wore white shirts and ties but these folks in the photos have more of a special look with theirs.

Thanks for dredging up those memories and for the wonderful photo.


Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Thursday, December 15, 2016 - 09:01 am:

Wonder what happened to all those rubber hoses & bells? They gotta be somewhere. Time for an E-bay check! I'd like one for my 120' driveway.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Val Soupios on Thursday, December 15, 2016 - 09:23 am:

They still have them at a gas station where I summer in the Adirondacks. It is a nice reminder of my first job pumping gas in the late fifties.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rick J. Gunter -- Sparta, Missouri, USA on Thursday, December 15, 2016 - 11:40 am:

Okay, what the heck? The pumps of either side are Wayne pre-visibles from the late 1910s but what is the thing he is getting the oil out of? It has the same body as the gas pumps. How does it work? Where are the oil tanks? Does it pump out several different grades of oil? Does anyone know what model number that thing is? I think I'll re-post that to the http://www.oldgas.org/ website and see if anyone knows over there.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Thursday, December 15, 2016 - 01:02 pm:

Rick,

That oil dispenser has about 6 spouts, each labeled with a different lubricant. Just like today, they all draw from the same barrel out back. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Severn - SE Texas on Friday, December 16, 2016 - 12:44 am:

I wonder which is the Marvel Mystery Oil?

Bill


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Warren Henderson, Dunbarton, NH on Friday, December 16, 2016 - 07:31 am:

Bill Everett, can you PLEASE, please "give them the tiger-tail for the gas cap cover".

Bill Severn, and I thought that I was the only one to start trouble.

Happy motoring,

Warren


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Severn - SE Texas on Saturday, December 17, 2016 - 12:26 am:

Warren,

I thought I'd stir the pot and see if it would boil. Obviously no takers today.

Bill


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Saturday, December 17, 2016 - 12:38 am:

Mom used to get annoyed at the guys who would wipe the windshield with an oily rag. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Velarde on Saturday, December 17, 2016 - 03:21 am:

I showed this photo to a co-worker of mine and the topic was "this guy is pouring oil in white" there is something to be learned from here as it should be. We don't see a quality anymore or a respect. We take our jobs for granted. I've always thought...bring in those new autos, pump their gas, wipe their glass, oil, tires....bring back service. I couldn't keep as clean as this guy and he is probably taking care of his last car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Saturday, December 17, 2016 - 12:04 pm:

Pan American was once the largest American oil company. Some interesting history here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pan_American_Petroleum_and_Transport_Company


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