O.T. coil

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: O.T. coil
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Thompson, Sudbury MA on Thursday, December 15, 2016 - 11:13 am:

working on 1946 Ford V8 flathead. I put electronic ignition in and runs fine for anywhere between 10-50 minutes, keeps burning out the coil. Anyone have a suggestion?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Cameron Whitaker, Oklahoma City on Thursday, December 15, 2016 - 12:23 pm:

6 or 12 volts?

More than likely, you'll need to add a dropping resistor. Check the manual for the coil. It should specify which dropping resistor you need.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Todd, ............Red Deer, Alberta on Thursday, December 15, 2016 - 12:53 pm:

Which way is the coil mounted? If mounted w/the connections down the current production coils will burn out, they must be mounted w/the connections up or horizontal.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Thursday, December 15, 2016 - 12:54 pm:

Which way do you have the coil orientated? Output to top or bottom? Epoxy/tar filled does not matter, oil filled does. They have been talking about coil melt downs over on Fordbarn.

http://www.fordbarn.com/forum/showthread.php?t=210865

http://www.fordbarn.com/forum/showthread.php?t=92373

http://www.fordbarn.com/forum/showthread.php?t=210928

http://www.fordbarn.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=4


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David L Corman on Thursday, December 15, 2016 - 02:46 pm:

Call Skip Haney at 1-941-637-6698 or Bubba at 1-317-487-9460. Both are Flathead ignition experts.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Sullivan on Thursday, December 15, 2016 - 03:03 pm:

Do you have an original equipment coil ? Seems like the voltage was supposed to be 3.2 volts, with the engine running. That was 50 some years ago, I could be wrong. This was for coils as used in 30's and 40's. Dave in Bellingham, WA


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Thompson, Sudbury MA on Thursday, December 15, 2016 - 03:42 pm:

I burnt out 3 coils so far the original a flame thrower which was supposed to have a built in resistor and another. This is 6 volt


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Thursday, December 15, 2016 - 03:47 pm:

This is the same problem that Model T and Model A and Volksbuggen distributor systems have. The made in whogivesapooistan parts are low quality. They fail early and often. You need to seek out better quality parts made in USA or Germany.

If you look on eBay or Amazon you can buy good Made in USA Bosch 6V or 12V coils and points and condensers for the T version. Better talk to a V8 guy to figure out the right answer there.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Thursday, December 15, 2016 - 05:04 pm:

The No 3 link I provided ask the same question.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Thursday, December 15, 2016 - 05:47 pm:

Unprecedented. Doesn't happen that quickly unless something is radically wrong. First what's the voltage of the battery you're using in the car and what terminal is the ground. (pos. or neg.). With a pos. ground the coil wires are hooked up "backwards". IE: the power wire goes to the neg. terminal on the coil with the pos. terminal on the coil going to the points. What does the instructions for your electronic ign. module say about this? Could be very important with a pos. ground system. Are you 100% sure your coils are the correct voltage and do they have internal resistors or do you need an external one. I believe excessive voltage is your problem. Whether it's incorrect coil voltage or a need for an external resistor. I repeat: coils do not burn out that quickly without a good reason. As to mounting I do not believe the direction of mounting it is a factor. Many have been posted here sitting in a miriad of positions.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jeff Hood -Long Beach, California on Thursday, December 15, 2016 - 06:05 pm:

Bill, call the manufacturer and tell them everything you have and how it is installed. I installed a Pertronix 6V positive ground in my flathead distributor and it took a few phone calls to get it right.

I bought a "matched" unit and flamethrower coil on e-bad. I read all of the instructions and installed it correctly. It would start and run for about 30 seconds and then shut off. First call to Pertronix, you must run resistor wires to your spark plugs. Original wire core wires will burn out the unit. The instructions did not mention the spark plug wires! It would now start and run, but the spark was very weak. Second call to Pertronix, my "matched" flamethrower coil was not correct. They are very sensitive to coil resistance. Runs much better with the correct coil. Note that on at least one website, my original coil was listed as correct.

Bottom line, call them directly and make sure everything is right for your application. Positive or negative ground, resistance wires, correct resistance (ohm) rating on the coil, 6V or 12V.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Thursday, December 15, 2016 - 06:39 pm:

And there's your answer.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John F. Regan on Thursday, December 15, 2016 - 10:40 pm:

Jeff:

Some of what I read in this thread sounds fishy. Resistance spark plug wire is made for installation in cars with radio interference caused by ignition spark plug wires. The resistance keeps the wires from radiating as antenna for the transmitter which is the distributor or for wood box coils the points at the wood coil box. Generally running resistance wire to spark plugs is a bad idea when it comes to the health of an ignition coil since the high resistance allows the spark voltage to be excessively high and it can then arc within the coil itself which kills the coil. I make T coils and somebody told my customer that his T would run better with resistance spark plug wires. This forced the energy in the coil to find a new way to get to ground and that was to arc inside the wood coil units on 2 of the coils and arc across the top surface of the plastic coil box liner on one of the others. He brought the "mess" to me and 2 of the coils were destroyed by the heavy and persistent internal arcing and the plastic coil box liner had to be removed and the
carbon track scraped away. It was salvaged OK but the man that advised my customer to use the resistance plug wire sure gave out some bad advice.

I installed a Pertronix on my wife's 65 Mustang a long time ago when they were just coming out. They used a resistance wire as the ballast for the coil and it lowered the 12V down to about half that voltage at the coil primary.

Oil filled ignition coils sometimes used in really hot locations might leak if turned upside down so that may be a legit warning and I know that mounting the distributor down low at the front of the motor right behind the hot radiator surface was not one of Ford's better ideas on my '40 coupe that I had in high school. That distributor really got hot when mounted there and that is what kills coils - HEAT.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jeff Hood -Long Beach, California on Friday, December 16, 2016 - 01:51 am:

John,

We're talking about modern oil filled coils here on a flathead. As I said, my engine would start and run for 20 or 30 seconds and quit. Pertronix told me that solid core wires would damage the ignitor, that it needed to sense a resistance, and that I needed to change to modern carbon core wires. Sure enough, it ran without shutting down with the modern wires. The next issue was a high RPM miss and I found a weak spark that essentially "went away" altogether as RPM was increased. The next call to Pertronix is when we found that I had the wrong coil. I don't recall the exact numbers now, but I think I had a 3 ohm coil and the correct one was a 1.5 ohm. Again this fixed the problem. This is on a 6V positive ground car if it matters. Pertronix told me that the unit was very sensitive to both coil resistance and plug wire resistance.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Friday, December 16, 2016 - 08:29 am:

Yeah, let's stay on point if possible. There's no reason on earth to install radio resistance wires in a T and by the way Bills car doesn't run long enough for heat to be a factor. Unless the coil's strapped to the exhaust manifold. There are incidentals associated with this module that Bill wasn't aware of but will be if he reads the posting.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David L Corman on Friday, December 16, 2016 - 09:37 pm:

Box up your distributor and ship to Skip Haney. He can set it up to be bullet-proof and while you are at it buy one of his coils. He can re-install the dual points and condenser and set up on distributor machine. NO MORE PROBLEMS Bubba can do the same thing.


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