Old Photo - Model T Brass Era Accident, Ain't That A Ditch! :-)

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Old Photo - Model T Brass Era Accident, Ain't That A Ditch! :-)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Saturday, December 17, 2016 - 10:25 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Watson -Florence,Colorado on Saturday, December 17, 2016 - 11:23 am:

This Flip was in Toronto.
Notice the Vertical Molding going up the Back of the Rear on this CANADIAN Ford

-Don


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Saturday, December 17, 2016 - 11:24 am:

Jay,

Thanks for posting. And have I ever not asked for a higher resolution copy? OK – probably not. But if you have a higher resolution copy or can give us a lead on where we may be able to obtain one it would be appreciated.

While this photo has been discussed before on the forum, it is still great to see it again. Every time we look at a photo we can often see new details we missed before.

The caption "1912?" can be answered easily - no it is not a 1912 Model T.

We can tell it is a Canadian bodied/produced T from the vertical seam centered on the rear wooden back panel running from top to bottom. That style also would date the car/body in 1909-10 model year. (I either need additional documentation or need to find the possible documentation I may have in the office to know if the vertical seam was discontinued before the 1911 style bodies were introduced or not.)



Assuming [and that is an assumption for these items – but definitely possible] that Ford of Canada followed the general order of things that the USA plant followed during that time frame we can note the following: It has the earlier “Non-billed” front fenders. On USA cars they were used on approximately the first 2500 cars. It has the rear butterfly arms that are outside rather than inside the rear fender skirt. Again for the USA cars that was used on the first 2500 or so cars.

Some questions for additional follow up:

1. Note the door handle location is not as low as the early USA produced cars. Did Ford of Canada always have it there on their 1909-1910 style bodies? Note their bodies were produced by a Canadian body company. They had the vertical seam on the back panel as well as the front seat had two bottom cushions. Were the door handles lower on earlier cars as it appears they were on USA bodies or did Canada keep it in that location the entire time?

2. Is it possible that is a two lever car? A higher resolution photo might provide that answer. And it may be possible to examine that one closer and see if what appears to be a second lever lines up with the same pivot point the clearly visible hand brake lever line up with.

3. And note the front wheels going in opposite directions. Did the front wheels contribute to the accident – i.e. going hard over or even the tie rod coming loose? Or are the wheels pointing in different directions as a result of the accident? Or perhaps both?

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Saturday, December 17, 2016 - 11:42 am:

I wonder if the driver or passengers jumped out first! Surely they did.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Saturday, December 17, 2016 - 01:18 pm:

Oops – CORRECTION: My posting above should have read the earliest USA (and assuming Canadian also) rear fenders have the butterfly irons that go up under the rear fender splash apron. They also have the fender iron that is centered on the fender as shown below on Model T #220 before it was restored:



And the later 1909-1910 fenders were changed so the butterfly fender iron came up under (inside) the splash apron as shown below.



That results in the fender iron being riveted closer to the body and not as nicely centered as on the 1908-earlier 1909 cars.



I rotated the Canadian touring so it is a little closer to how we normally see them. It has the later 1909 – 1910 (based on USA dates) style rear fender and fender irons that come through the fender splash apron rather than up under the splash apron.



I apologize for the mistake. (Or as I have been known to occasionally hear and sometimes say, “Turn left… No! the other left! )

Respectfully corrected,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Jefferson, Ohio on Saturday, December 17, 2016 - 02:27 pm:

Maybe he just pulled it down there to wash the interior or was holding a class for the folks above on how to change the muffler...didn't think of that eh!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham on Saturday, December 17, 2016 - 03:56 pm:

I'd bet a failed tie-rod caused the accident. ?? I wonder what became of the car after the wreck ?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John C Codman on Sunday, December 18, 2016 - 12:07 am:

I am constantly amazed by the level of knowledge shown on this forum.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Evan in Paso Robles on Sunday, December 18, 2016 - 12:58 pm:

Hap,

Now came on and fess-up……..you flipped it over so the boys down-under could better understand the image! ;~0


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