Old Photo - "Good Roads" Paving Crew In 1920's Mississippi

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Old Photo - "Good Roads" Paving Crew In 1920's Mississippi
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Monday, December 19, 2016 - 09:43 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Monday, December 19, 2016 - 12:41 pm:

What a great old scene ! Concrete is such a messy job. I do not see
a stitch of rebar going into this pour ! Love the old wood guide posts.
Ancient Southern Bell Tel & Tel construction on close pole. Old flappity-
-backs are for power on the far one.

Here is a fizzy-junky double groove pony marked "S.B.T.&T.CO." made
by Hemingray in the late 1880's:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Monday, December 19, 2016 - 01:00 pm:

Concrete looks mighty thin too. Bet that road was rubble in 5 years.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham on Monday, December 19, 2016 - 01:12 pm:

It sure would be today, but maybe held up well at the time ? Probably no frost heaves in Mississippi, lighter loads and lower speeds ?

Heck, today, the 18 wheelers doing 80mph make rubble out of the local interstates in less than five years !!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Jefferson, Ohio on Monday, December 19, 2016 - 04:00 pm:

That road is thicker then you think. look at the fellow in front of the screed he is calf deep in concrete. The ground is dug down in the middle but is being used as the concrete forms on the sides giving it the appearance of being thin.

Burger, the contractor offered the county inspector a kick back if he didn't mention to the county engineer that he wasn't including rebar. I could tell you some real horror stories about what the architects draw in the prints and what some contractors skimp on or hide when its underground in in walls. I've seen roads that they poured 1 inch to 2 inches thinner then what was called for...doesn't sound like much until you add up the amount of concrete and the cost savings on a piece of road 40 feet wide by 20 miles long.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Noonan - Norton, MA. on Monday, December 19, 2016 - 04:06 pm:

Looks like even back then they had the good sense to put a slight crown in the road for water runoff.


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