Old Photo - Model T Era - Blacksmith Gas Station

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Old Photo - Model T Era - Blacksmith Gas Station
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Wednesday, December 21, 2016 - 10:15 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Wednesday, December 21, 2016 - 11:20 am:

Another great one. I was trying to identify the differentials at left. Then I realized they were lawn mowers like one I used to push. I guess we see what we want to see sometimes.
Thanks
Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Owens on Wednesday, December 21, 2016 - 12:11 pm:

I like the cutting torch next to the pumps. Scott


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Wednesday, December 21, 2016 - 12:15 pm:

I could swear I posted a comment to this earlier, but it seems to be missing. What I tried to post was:

I'm surprised the fellow there has acetylene in a bottle rather than a carbide generator. Also, what do you think the tank is for outside the side door. It may just be sitting there. It doesn't appear to be a boiler. I was thinking it might be a compressed air tank?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Darel J. Leipold on Wednesday, December 21, 2016 - 12:44 pm:

From a web site:
In 1902, German scientist Dr. Carl Von Linde built a plant for producing liquid air and then fractioned it to produce pure oxygen. After building separation plants in Europe, he then found the Linde Air Products Company in Cleveland, Ohio.
With acetylene and oxygen readily available, the world was ready for better cutting torches. John Harris exhibited a torch at the 1904 St. Louis World’s Fair andstarted Harris Calorific in 1905, and Elmer Smith founded Smith Equipment Company in 1916. However, one can argue that the modern oxy-fuel torch and regulator design began with an accident in San Francisco in 1913.

1906,  (Nils) Gustaf Dalén found a solution.   “Numerous unsuccessful attempts were made to prepare such a porous mass which would be sufficiently resistant and elastic to withstand the shocks encountered in transportation, without cracking and crumbling and thus producing cavities filled with explosive acetylene gas.”

Thus gas and oxygen tanks were available after 1906. I knew Elmer Smith. His original company was in St. Paul MN. He had a home (in his later years) on the river in Afton MN next to my inlaws. His company became "Smithco" and produced the best welding equipment available. They also made units that would use carbide and water to produce your own acetylene and you would use natural air for welding.

Thus this photo could have been taken anytime in the teens or twenties.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Lance Sorenson, Hector, Minnesota on Wednesday, December 21, 2016 - 01:40 pm:

Another Minneapolis Company.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Daron - Brownsburg IN on Wednesday, December 21, 2016 - 03:48 pm:

Hal,that may be the tank from old acetylene generator.I saw one in Southern Il. a few years back.At first I thought it was an old coal furnace,due to it's size. The guy said it was in use till about 10 years ago.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham on Wednesday, December 21, 2016 - 04:21 pm:

Oxy-acetylene cutting/welding is almost gone the way of the buffalo nowadays. Most who use it use it for cutting only, which is rather too bad. The right set of skills for gas welding can be better than "handy" for the restorer. You can do things with the right tip and a carburizing flame that cannot be done with an arc welder or wire-feed if you're doing body work.

Many say it's too slow, but if you're working on a Model T, what's the big rush ?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Wednesday, December 21, 2016 - 04:24 pm:

I may not have a good understanding of it, but I was of the assumption that it was very common for welders to use bottled oxygen in conjunction with acetylene from a carbide generator.

I briefly looked on the internet for some info and stumbled upon a welding forum. One guy had found one and wanted to use it. You wouldn't believe the guys telling him how dangerous it was and that it was just a time bomb waiting to go off etc.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Wednesday, December 21, 2016 - 11:36 pm:

Welding, like most things, went through decades of development. There was a time (early in the past century) when carbide acetylene generators were used in conjunction with compressed oxygen tanks. One of the guys that works at the local gasses supply has a couple early welding carbide generators on display in their shop.

Darel L, Thank you for the "Smith" link! I have my dad's old Smith-Gauge set. He bought it a few years before I came along. I remember it from when I was very little, and he told me that when he got it, he had to save up for awhile because he wanted one of the best welding sets around. This is the set I learned to weld with when I was 10 to 12 years old, and what I use for most of my welding, brazing, heating work today. The gauges are off a bit, but I think he got his money's worth out of it.
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


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