Powder coat clincher rims versus galvanized $

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Powder coat clincher rims versus galvanized $
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ignacio Valdes on Wednesday, December 21, 2016 - 01:12 pm:

Local powder coater will blast and powder coat clincher rims rim only for $50/rim. Local galvanizer will do 100 lb weight of anything for about $150, blast for $40. I assume you would want to blast before powder coating and/or galvanizing? Probably the powder coat would be more durable?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Wednesday, December 21, 2016 - 01:16 pm:

Yes, the rims should be blasted prior to either process. Be sure that they blast both the outside and inside of the rims, especially in the pockets where the tire beads fit.

If it were me and the total costs were comparable, I would have them blasted and galvanized, that is the process most similar to how they were done originally.

My local powder coater is much less expensive than yours, but that may be because he has seen my Model T and taken a liking to it (plus, I talk to him nicely and don't bug him about when or how fast the work will be done). :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Wednesday, December 21, 2016 - 01:24 pm:

If you go with powder coat, please consider getting a matte/dull finish. Shiny, glossy rims just wouldn't look right, at least to me.

That said, I think galvanizing would be the most durable.

That said, mine are painted silver. Just one spray can away from a complete refinish if needed.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Wednesday, December 21, 2016 - 01:29 pm:

The ones on my '17 Hayes demountable wire wheels were zinc plated in the mid 1950's. Plating still looks great. I would get zinc plating. Looks just like galvanized, lasts a long time.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Wednesday, December 21, 2016 - 01:38 pm:

What is the fascination with powdercoating ?

While durable in SOME applications, it fails, and when it fails, it fails
catastrophically, peeling off like an onion and causing all sorts of rust
issues underneath. To repair, unlike paint, requires a VERY labor inten-
sive sandblast to remove ALL remaining powdercoating, before a new
application can be made.

Galvanized is OEM and correct and looks so good. Silver paint is
stupidly cheap and can be repaired SO easily and still looks pretty good.
I would not recommend powdercoating for anything exposed to impacts,
vibrations, or weather. The cost and hassle factor to repair it is ungood.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Wednesday, December 21, 2016 - 09:16 pm:

Don't do it! Zinc plate your rims as original, but only after sandblasting.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ted Dumas on Wednesday, December 21, 2016 - 09:43 pm:

Rattle can silver will save you a lot of money and trouble. It looks nice and is easily touched up or redone. It also keeps you from hemoraging when a tire tool garfs up your $150 finish.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Wednesday, December 21, 2016 - 09:55 pm:

I'd stay away from powder coating your wheels.I have a set of powder coated wire wheels That got all chipped up the first time I used a set of tire irons changing the tires.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Wednesday, December 21, 2016 - 11:52 pm:

There's persistent confusion over terms whenever this subject comes up. To galvanize is to coat with zinc. Galvanizing = zinc plating = zinc coating = coating with zinc.

Galvanizing is done two ways:
Hot dip ~ the object to be plated is dipped in hot zinc.
Electroplate ~ The object is plated electrically, just as it would be with copper, nickel, or chrome.

Which method is better? The way electroplating is practiced these days, hot dip is far better. If you have used any allegedly galvanized nails in recent years, you have probably found that they soon turn to rust spots. Their zinc electroplate is so thin that it might as well not even be there. This is why at auctions I buy cans of old galvanized nails that were made when hot dip was the standard method.


Typically there is a minimum charge for galvanizing. When I had these seven rims done it was about $232, which worked out to about $33 each. For that minimum charge I could have had up to sixty rims done, which would be about $3.87 each. Any more would add enough weight to raise the price.


Over time the shine will diminish, and the rims will take on more of a gray color. But the rust protection will last for decades.


After four years mine are not quite as bright as when they were fresh, but I think they still looks pretty good.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Wednesday, December 21, 2016 - 11:59 pm:


I used the same photo twice, and editing won't let me correct it. This was supposed to be the first picture.


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