Postcards from bygone era

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Postcards from bygone era
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter Adey on Wednesday, December 21, 2016 - 04:17 pm:

Interesting set of old postcards - circa 1916

























Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Wednesday, December 21, 2016 - 04:37 pm:

AWESOME GROUP OF POSTCARDS!!! Many Thanks for your post here!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Wednesday, December 21, 2016 - 04:44 pm:

Very impressive.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Wednesday, December 21, 2016 - 05:08 pm:

Yes,Thank you very much!! Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dallas landers on Wednesday, December 21, 2016 - 05:16 pm:

Thanks Peter
The one photo of the guy sitting in the chasis on some sort of test roller looks like Jesse James. Great pics!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter Adey on Wednesday, December 21, 2016 - 05:35 pm:

The one of the English language class is intriguing. Gave great jobs to the very large number of immigrants at the time..


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Wednesday, December 21, 2016 - 07:37 pm:

Absolutely in awe of these postcards, and also with the technology of manufacture of the day. We have to remember that these huge plants pretty much popped up in a short span of time, less than 10 years? Incredible. Some of which would be shut down in a heartbeat by OSHA!! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By joe bell on Wednesday, December 21, 2016 - 07:46 pm:

Great pictures!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Eviston on Wednesday, December 21, 2016 - 08:48 pm:

I'm a little confused.Are these new reprints,or were old cards just recently mailed? 2015(maybe2016)postmark,Zip code and a forever stamp.If I miidsed the explanation,a pox upon me.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Eviston on Wednesday, December 21, 2016 - 09:01 pm:

Also,look at "setting the motor for final assembly"and all the odd things-front crossmember,odd intake and hot air pipe.Evidently,when they colorized these by hand,considerable artistic license was used.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter Adey on Thursday, December 22, 2016 - 06:50 am:

I just realized I double dipped on one of the photos - here is the one I missed... Pistons!



and some era stats....




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Thursday, December 22, 2016 - 08:33 am:

Very interesting stats. The noise level in the picture with the forest of belts had to be unimaginable. And 22 tons a day of coal is impressive, probably only surpassed by the Titanic at approx. 34 tons per day and her sister, Olympic at 28 tons per day.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Thursday, December 22, 2016 - 10:03 am:

Yup,I wonder how many [Belt Men] there were? We can still live part of it hands on at The Henry Ford.If the post cards are impressive think about seeing one of the org Gas Steam engines where you can walk right up to it!!! I do not know if that 6,000 hp was one side or both? The engine was gas or steam which ever was cheapiest at the time!! Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Thursday, December 22, 2016 - 10:09 am:

It must have taken a lot of time stacking the pistons in such neat stacks!
The flapping belts and shafting with no guards must have been a sight to see.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Kossor - Kenilworth, NJ on Thursday, December 22, 2016 - 11:24 am:

Thanks for sharing. Wonderful images of incredible manufacturing capability from a long bygone era.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Thursday, December 22, 2016 - 11:34 am:

312.5 gallons of lubricating oil used every hour....that would have been a lucrative contract!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patterson - Medical Lake, WA on Thursday, December 22, 2016 - 12:45 pm:

Does anyone know if the 17 piece Ford post card set is covered by current copyrights? I'd like to forward to interested parties but want to insure I'm not violating any copyrights.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Thursday, December 22, 2016 - 12:55 pm:

I wonder how many of the 20,000 "listening to President Wilson" could hear him.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Landry, Hudson, NH on Thursday, December 22, 2016 - 01:04 pm:

Probably none of them if they worked in that noisy factory all day!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter Adey on Thursday, December 22, 2016 - 02:36 pm:

Jim - I do not know about the copyright of the photos - but many of these (in B&W) are on buried on this site - if that helps...

"Happy Motoring" - Humble Oil


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Thursday, December 22, 2016 - 02:55 pm:

Tim,

That is 22 tons of coal PER HOUR !!!! x 24, that's 528 tons per day !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John C Codman on Thursday, December 22, 2016 - 03:08 pm:

"Largest direct current control board in the world..." It stands to reason - Edison was the Direct Current guy, and Henry's pal. One of the rare instances where 'ol Tom got it wrong.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Thursday, December 22, 2016 - 03:49 pm:

Jim

IMO these Ford picture post cards are in the public domain as were printed prior to 1923.

So likely OK to use anyway.

copyright.gov/circs/circ15a.pdf
law that affect duration and gives details about terms of protection for copy- ... works published in the United States before January 1, 1923, are in the public domain ...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Thursday, December 22, 2016 - 07:18 pm:

Thanks Burger! You're right, and actually I meant per hour on the two boats! some- timers is settin' in again!! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Doolittle on Thursday, December 22, 2016 - 07:52 pm:

Question on postcard #1. When were zip codes put unto service? 1963, I think. Google it. Did that card sit on somebody's desk and finally get mailed in '63 or later?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ZIP_Code

..........


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Jensen on Friday, December 23, 2016 - 08:52 am:

My daughter bought me a copy of Richard Snow's book "I Invented the Modern Age" In the book he quotes a journalist of the time, Julian Street's, description of the plant. "Of course there was order in that place, of course there was system-relentless system-terrible 'efficiency'-but to my mind...the whole room, with its interminable aisles, its whirling shafts and wheels, its forest of roof-supporting posts and flapping, flying, leather belting, its endless rows of writhing machinery, its shrieking, hammering, and clatter, its smell of oil, its autumn haze of smoke, its savage-looking foreign population-to my mind it expressed but one thing, and that thing was delirium.
Fancy a jungle of wheels and belts and weird iron forms-of men, machinery and movement--add to it every kind of sound you can imagine: the sound of a million squirrels chirking, a million monkeys quarreling, a million lions roaring, a million pigs dying, a million elephants smashing through a forest of sheet iron, a million boys whistling on their fingers, a million others coughing with the whooping cough, a million sinners groaning as they are dragged to hell-imagine all of this happening at the very edge of Niagara Falls, with the everlasting roar of the cataract as a perpetual background, and you may acquire a vague conception of that place."

Highland Park

Not so much now.


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