Share your first T experience!

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Share your first T experience!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Cameron Whitaker, Oklahoma City on Friday, December 23, 2016 - 01:28 pm:

I'm sure this has been posted before, but let's do this again! Share your first Model T experience!

For me, I had always loved Ts, even when I was little. Didn't know much about them, but I knew that I liked them (I'm only 27, so it wasn't like it was that long ago). I remember that I decided to look up Model Ts on YouTube shortly after I got into college in 2007, and I remember how fascinated I was. I even thought that it would be so cool to be driving a touring around my subdivision. Little did I know that four years later, I'd actually be doing that!

My Mom got us involved at the Old Kingsbury Aerodrome around 2009. They have lots of WWI planes, and lots of Ts. My first day there, I didn't really know what to do. I kept looking at the cars, quite happy that I got to see a real Model T up close and in person!

They said they couldn't drive them because they were waiting for a volunteer to show up with some charged batteries. When he came, they decided to fire up a TT, which I was clearly interested in.

Then one of the volunteers asked me if I wanted to drive it. I couldn't say yes fast enough! He taught me the pedals and controls, and as I was puttering around in low gear, my grin must have been from ear to ear!

We got so far before the TT died. Now I knew nothing mechanically about Ts whatsoever. However, it sounded like an ignition problem, and it happened to be equipped with a VW distributor, and as the owner of a problematic '65 Beetle, that was definitely something I could handle.

I quickly diagnosed the problem as a bad connection, and a few moments later, we were on our merry way! They quite quickly drafted me into Team Vehicles.

Long story short, I purchased some of the service books available, and read a lot online. I went from knowing nothing about Ts to being the lead mechanic at the museum in just months. And a couple years later, I was eventually able to buy my '24 Touring.

I guess when the T bug bites you, it bites you hard!

For the record, my T came with a VW distributor. As soon as I first looked at the car, my brother clearly recalled my saying "That's gotta go." I'm running a timer and coils now :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Friday, December 23, 2016 - 01:35 pm:

Driving it right off the front of my buddies trailer! Typical newbie screw up... "well you DO PUSH the clutch in, don't ya?!?" He and I laughed our asses off almost half of the four hour trip home that day.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By JIM WILSON, AMORY, MS on Friday, December 23, 2016 - 01:48 pm:

Went to pick up a 26 Roadster PU. The owner was not there. His wife said he was no longer sure he wanted to sell the car but she wanted it out of the yard. We gave her the $35 and loaded it up. Owner later mailed me paperwork.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Friday, December 23, 2016 - 01:49 pm:

The first experience that was more than just passing old derelicts in
fields was a TT in Mrs. Miller's implement shed. I was about 12 at the
time. It was complete and looked as if ready to go bring in a load from
her fields. I got in and sat down, sorta sized up the situation, but nothing
more ever came of it, other than returning to do the same thing a few
more times. 40 years would pass before I finally decided to actually get
one and do something with it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Friday, December 23, 2016 - 02:12 pm:

Initially I rode in the TT we now have as a baby in my mothers arms. It was my grandfathers orchard truck. Sometimes after dinner we'd use it to go out in the back of the orchard where there were a few peach trees and get some fresh peaches for dessert.

A little later, when I was around 4 years old or so, when the family would pile on the old truck to get peaches I'd run behind it yelling, "I'm not gonna ride in that old junk!!"

Still later, when I was around 12 or so, I went out to collect boxed fruit with my grandfather and my uncle. They showed me how to work the pedals. My job was, after they had loaded a stack, to move the truck to the next stack of boxes. The very first time they said, "OK. Pull forward to the next stack." I killed it. If looks could kill, I wouldn't be here to tell the story. :-)

It looks pretty much the same now as it did 60 years ago except for the obviously new side boards.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dallas landers on Friday, December 23, 2016 - 02:31 pm:

At my uncle Bill Landers was the first I can remember being around a T. He restored and bought and sold many. That was before you could sit in your livingroom and find new and used parts. I stopped to see him out in the garage and he would be working on a motor with hard copper wire ran to plugs to test it out.I never paid much attension to the old fords and he passed away many years ago. One day it hit me when I saw one for sale,like a brick. I bought my 1st one last spring and I wondered why it took so long to find me. I drive it as often as I can and 2 more T's found me this summer. There is something about putting down the road at 25-30 mph that is relaxing. Everone smiles and waives but the guy in a hurry. He waives to but with less fingers. The harley and the streetrod dont gat driven much now. As my buddy says " OPEN FENDERS RULE"
drive safe and often


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eugene Story on Friday, December 23, 2016 - 02:42 pm:

I was about 3 when we came home from a pitch card party , when we got home the neighbors little boy about my age was setting behind the spare tire with his arm and head on top of the tire, Then mom run over dads bird dog,and then we went to another card party and a goat jumped on the running board then the fender up on the hood and up on the top and fell through the soft top.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Friday, December 23, 2016 - 02:48 pm:

I remember so clearly, seeing for the first time, the incredible museum collection of Henry Austin Clark and how enormous some of those old brass dinosaurs looked. _I was only a schoolboy in 2nd grade and at that time, the whole world was a wondrous smorgasbord of discovery, so it was very unusual for any single experience to stand out. _But the towering brass automobiles, with their hip-high runningboards, hula-hoop-tall wagon wheels, bucket-sized gas headlamps and diamond-tufted seats were ever so much larger than life. _And holy cow!—It must have taken a giant every bit as strong as Daddy to start those locomotive engines with just a hand-crank!

And so, at the tender age of maybe six, I became a Brass Car Guy. _As we left the museum, Dad said, "Yeah, well, maybe when you're older and you have your driver's license, you can buy yourself one of these cars—but, you know; first you'll have to learn to drive a 'standard-shift'."
The phrase, 'standard-shift,' always made my Mom shudder. _At the time, Dad was teaching her to drive our old '51 Mercury and she just wasn't catching on to how to handle 'three-on-a-tree.' _I presumed, therefore, that learning to shift gears by hand was going to be a challenge of Odyssean magnitude. _I had no idea that the abrupt, pubescent addition of copious quantities of testosterone to an already-existing XY-chromosomal makeup would cause me to awaken one day with a fully-developed knowledge of handling a manual transmission. _Never having done it before, muscle-memory experience, which I presumed must have suddenly dropped into my being from a previous life, was simply there. _You don't teach a game fish to swim, a junkyard dog to bark, or a girlfriend's cat to be a pain in the neck, because those abilities are just part of the fabric of what the animal happens to be, and so it was with the Marvel Mystery Oil now coursing through my veins.

Well, a lot of years went by. _Alan Shepard rode a rocket into outer space and John Glenn went into orbit. _There were miniskirts and Beatle-boots and the music that went along with it and then there were mood-rings and that absolutely ridiculous musical aberration known as Disco—which crossed all cultural lines and for an all too brief half-decade, seemed to eradicate all racial tensions as everyone from every background was dancing together to the same stupid, disco-duck music while wearing the same, equally stupid polyester leisure-suits. _A mixed blessing if ever there was one.

But I digress (always wanted to say that).

Then I got married, bought a house and raised a daughter. _After paying off the resulting credit-card debt, I found myself well past the age of combing my hair over and indulging in the traditional, incongruous, old-bald-guy-in-a-new-top-down-Corvette, mid-life crisis. _Fortunately, there was this antique car hobby, populated by gray old farts like me who still pledged allegiance to the flag at club meetings, wore their baseball hats the right way and thought the Beatles were nowhere near as good as Elvis.

Dad was well into his eighties when I surreptitiously acquired a 1915 Model T like the one he and Uncle Lou bought together just before WWII. _He was surprised as hell. _He walked around the car and noted the "NON-SKID" tire treads that he had once pointed out to me back at the museum a thousand years ago. _He reminded me to tuck my thumb while cranking; the engine caught and went, "kisskisskisskisskisskiss," and we climbed aboard.
And then, without breaking his straight-ahead gaze through the windshield, he commented, "So, you learned how to work a standard-shift."


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Friday, December 23, 2016 - 03:12 pm:

I guess my first Model T experience was about 1958 when I was in high school. I saw a nice 1927 sedan for sale with a $700 price tag. I tried to get my folks to buy it, but no deal. In those days that was a pretty high price for a used car. My second Model T experience was over thirty years later when I bought my roadster pickup project.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Friday, December 23, 2016 - 03:44 pm:

1963, my aunt in MI wrote that my cousin's 1925 cut-off was to be offered to me. Dad bought it from his sister Marilyn for $300.

Me, age 15 back then, outside the barn it sat in, knowing nothing about cars, only lawn mowers, but I got the T bug and it stuck! :-)



Growing up, never worked on more 'modern' cars, 'til this day can't set a distributor, but sure can tune a vibrator coil and rebuild a T magneto!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Friday, December 23, 2016 - 04:11 pm:

I grew up with a Model A Sport Coupe (still have it), the original owner died when I was a year old and it sat there until my brothers started to "fix it up" Well, girls and school got in their way, so I finished the job! The car I slid down the fenders as a 4 year old sits in my garage now. But what about Ts?? Well some years back Tom Sharpsteen and Jim Tangeman decided to build a T railcar and donate it to the Portola Railroad museum. When Ttom got the '23 roadster (with pickup bed) running, he called me and said, "We'd better drive this thing around a bit before we put on the railroad wheels."
I still think he knew what he was doing--get me behind the wheel and I'd convert. Well, yep, we drove through his orchard and down some back roads around Orland and I was hooked. My part of the project was the interior, so a call to Carter's Cut-n-Cover" got me an interior (I have put interior kits in many Model As, so this was fairly easy for me) and now it sits in the Portola RR Museum, I got to drive it around the tracks a few times, but I can't tell you if it's still running now.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Friday, December 23, 2016 - 05:37 pm:

I was riding in Model T's from the time I was an infant. I started working on them as soon as I was capable of holding a wrench. There are earlier photos of me in Model T's, but I like this one from 1959 because it was used in the Braniff employee newsletter and in the Minneapolis Star - Tribune. That's my dad driving the 1925 roadster pickup talking to the president of Braniff Airways.



The car was black body with cream naugahyde upholstery, red bed and white Hayes wire wheels. The wheels from that T are the same ones on my '17 runabout today.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Addington on Friday, December 23, 2016 - 05:42 pm:

When I went to pick up my TT I was not very comfortable with driving a T yet so asked the guy that I was buying it from to load it on the trailer. Well he almost drove it over the front of the trailer and I thought "man that was kinda dumb" When I got it home I managed to get it unloaded without a mishap, took it for a short drive out in my hay field and was thinking fiddle this is going pretty good. HOWEVER I then pulled it into the shop and proceeded to stuff the front fenders under the work bench before I got it stopped. No rear damage just scuffed the paint a little. Sort of had to rethink the issue the guy had when we loaded it. LOL


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Friday, December 23, 2016 - 05:46 pm:

Actually, I had never given Model Ts much thought until I got the itch four years ago.

I had always been a Mopar muscle car guy, but after having owned several over a period of years, but I got the itch for "something different".

The first time I sat in a Model T was driving the test drive on the day that I picked it up from the previous owner. He insisted that I drive because he wasn't comfortable driving it. I knew what to do from viewing tutorial videos and reading what the controls did.

It was kind of a "baptism of fire"! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Killecut on Friday, December 23, 2016 - 05:49 pm:

When I was about five my father and grandfather took me with them to a local junkyard. There was a T fire truck in the yard, my grandfather put me in the drivers seat which I really enjoyed of course. Jokingly he told me he was going to buy it for me. I thought he was going to get for me. There was an empty lot on both sides of our house at the time and I had the spot all picked out where I was going to put it. Probably my first big disappointment in life.

The second time was at fourteen, there was a tudor sedan for sale locally for $50. It was sold before I could earn the money, just as well as I would have stupidly made a hot rod out of it. After a bunch of V8 Fords I went to Hershey looking for a V8 station wagon I came home with my 14 instead.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rick Goelz-Knoxville,TN on Friday, December 23, 2016 - 06:18 pm:

I pushed in on the "clutch" and almost stuffed my new radiator into a bench vise, stalled it before it hit.

Rick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Friday, December 23, 2016 - 06:33 pm:

My first experience with a model T?
I remember it like it was yesterday. I was probably just two years old, just beginning to grow up near the Rose Garden in San Jose Califunny. There was a local "junk man" that drove an old model T (runabout or touring?) cut down with a pickup box on the back. (My mother would tell me to stay away from him because he was some some sort of a bum.) A few times, I saw him drive down our street. One day, he stalled the thing right in front of our house! I stood at the living room window and watched as he crank started it! I knew right then and there that I had to have one of those!
I spent a lot time as a child at my grandparent's ranch, where there was a lot of old equipment and junk, and we had a fair amount of junk and interesting stuff at home also. Before I was fifteen, I was joining antique automobile clubs and reading the magazines. I bought a 1929 REO and drove it to high school part of the time. Then I started working on my first model T (a speedster) about a year later.
I have been playing with these silly things for a long time now!
Drive carefully, and enjoy the holidays! W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Friday, December 23, 2016 - 08:36 pm:

It was 60 + years ago so I don't remember the first time.

It had to be in my Dad's 22 four door in the early 50's.
I do remember going to parades in Duxbury Mass, the Brockton fair, meets in W. Bridgewater, and trips to my grandparents in New Bedford.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Philip Berg on Saturday, December 24, 2016 - 01:38 am:

I use to accompany my Grandfather on HCCA tours in the early seventies. Can't remember any specific details except one tour his 1911 (which I now own) caught on fire. My brother was in the car and jumped out into a ditch.

After that incident he would never ride in a model t again. Fast forward to tomorrow, Christmas eve. My brother is coming to visit and I plan to take him for a ride in the 11 again. But this time I have a fire extinguisher handy.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Govoni on Saturday, December 24, 2016 - 10:11 am:

Let's see.... I would say my brother. He put together a 1915 touring. We drove it to the store. I also worked for Don Lang for a little bit one summer when my brother worked for him. My first drive was with Marshall VanWinkle. He let me drive his T. It was fun. Many years later I bought my 26 touring. I've got a lot to do on it but it will run soon!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John C Codman on Saturday, December 24, 2016 - 10:52 am:

Learning to drive one in a friend's '24 touring. We took over a high school parking lot one Saturday afternoon. As it turned out, there was a local newspaper photographer there, and a photo of the lesson made the local paper.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Duey_C on Saturday, December 24, 2016 - 10:03 pm:

Watched a center door fade away as it sat beside a shed for many years since I was a boy. It was parked after it over-centered the steering. We'd drive past it about every week. My son (he was barely driving age) went to the auction as I had a festival to work that day. It's down in the woods waiting until I grow the stones to tackle the body wood again.
Driving? As soon as I got the Crappy T put together enough to drive, I taught myself how to deal with this almost serpent like mechanical creature. So very flexible and twisty! Scared the hell out of me that first time I drove it down the hill.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Kossor - Kenilworth, NJ on Sunday, December 25, 2016 - 11:07 am:

Introduced to the hobby by a friend, enjoying riding in his beautiful 1909 touring. Didn't consider owning one due to the seemingly complicated operation. He encouraged me to collaborate on developing a maintenance free electronic ignition. We started development together but didn't get past the progress stage as Henry put it so in his view the project was not a success. That motivated me to acquire my own 1927 Touring and learn how to drive it to finish development of what would become the E-Timer.

It was a wonderful experience leaning to drive the Touring and soon fell in love with it despite the some times frustrating learning curve many newbies experience when assuming care taker of a dormant Model T; clogged sediment bowl, leaking felt gas line seals, lose timer brush, etc. Now the whole family loves going for T rides in our '27 Touring. My Son Chris recently got his driving permit and was eager to learn to drive it and does so every chance he gets. It is a wonderful hobby and thankful for my friend introducing me to it. Merry Christmas All!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Vaughn - Lincoln, NE on Sunday, December 25, 2016 - 11:51 am:

I have been around the Model T since i was a small child. The 1st picture my dad is driving with close family friends. I'm the blonde headed kid in the back seat, mom is behind dad. The second picture is me playing in the T when I was about 2 years old.




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Sunday, December 25, 2016 - 12:43 pm:

The First time I remember seeing a running "T" was when I moved to a house with a bigger yard in 2000. I had always liked older original cars 40's/50's/60's but when I saw my new neighbor driving his "T" I knew I wanted one. Carl invited me to see his old cars (Mostly "T's")and over the years even sold me a couple of cars, But he wouldn't part with one of his "T's" or the 28 leather bodied Fiat or the Model A truck. Anything else was negotiable. When Carl became ill and wasn't able to do as much I would help occasionally in his garage mostly just finding something or asking a question about one of his cars. One day he asked me if I was still interested in a "T", You could have knocked me over with a feather. You bet I said so he showed me three gave me a good price and said take your pick,hold on I said I have to get my wife over here to make sure I get the right one. We got the 27 roadster. Then I looked at him and said you just got hired. He said what for? I said someone has to teach me how to drive it! He laughed and said "It's a very simple car you'll pick it up quick". Carl passed a couple of years later and I still find myself wanting to walk over to his house and ask a question or two, and hear him tell me "A model "T" is a tinkerer's car. The rest as they say is history.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham on Sunday, December 25, 2016 - 09:07 pm:

The summer I turned 14, for the princely sum of $75.00 I became the proud owner of a derelict 1920 cut-off touring. By the end of a year's time, I had "restored" it, mostly by taking it all apart and cleaning everything up, regardless how worn-out. After correcting valve timing (by the piston-travel method) and going back over the electrical connections (again), by some miracle, it ran !! I knew then exactly how Dr. Frankenstein must have felt . . . " IT'S ALIVE !!!"

Fast-forward 54 years to 10pm this past November 1: by the light of a street-lamp, the transport guys unloaded a 1913 roadster I had bought sight-unseen from 2500 miles away. I needed to drive it a couple hundred yards into a shop building for the night before I could drive it ten miles out home. Transport guy asked me, "Do you know how to start and drive this thing ?" I told him I reckoned I did, but it's been a long time. I set the spark and throttle, turned the switch to "BAT" and was immediately rewarded with a free start ! Once again, that old elated feeling ! "IT'S ALIVE !!!"


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Lovejoy, So Cal on Sunday, December 25, 2016 - 10:08 pm:

I started looking for a T when my Dad's health started going south. We were best buddies and we rode motorcycles. I thought what would be as much fun or close, that we could do together. I remembered him talking of model T's when he was growing up. So we got a Runabout and had many wonderful outings together with it. That little car impressed me so much I got a TT and have become a real model T fan.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Aaron Griffey, Hayward Ca. on Sunday, December 25, 2016 - 10:17 pm:

I bought a '29 Nash from a lady that inherited everything her father had when he died.
Some months later I took the Nash back to the 3 car garage it was in after replacing the roof of the garage.
I got to use the garage for two years and got a '22 T. In exchange for the new roof work and materials and the two doors I made for the garage. I closed one door off completely.
They could never figure out where the T body was but the engine had been rebuilt and all assembled with the transmission.
The front end was assembled and painted as was the frame.
So I joined the local T club and toured with them in the Nash.
When a member advertised his speedster for sale I went and bought it.
Eventually I built a speedster out of the '22, but I still have the '22 frame as it was when new.
I sold both speedsters but still have a '26 touring that I spent a couple of years restoring.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Freighter Jim on Sunday, December 25, 2016 - 11:04 pm:

Mine is a little different.

I had hauled Model T's for a few years but did not fully appreciate them.

Then I got an opportunity to transport a very special Center Door T.

I spent several hours visiting with the widow who was donating it - heard about the last day her husband was alive.

Then she kindly took me upstairs to see his office/study left untouched just the way he left it the day he unexpectedly died.

He had collected muscle cars - there were pictures on the wall of him & his collection gathered over the years.

For some reason he bought the Model T - drove it down the block - put it in storage - never drove it again.

It was hard for her to see it go.

It was his last car she was parting with.

My " putt putt moment" was when I met Jay Klehfoth where I was taking the car to.

That was the first of several Model T's I have transported to the MTFCA Museum - it sits there today.

Since then I have transported over 100 more Model T's and each one has its' own unique history and meaning.

More so than any other make & model of vehicle I transport - the Model T is the most fascinating and rewarding.

I have met many friends over the years and seen many places in this great country we are privileged to live in.

Thank you Jay !


Freighter Jim




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kurt Baltrusch on Monday, December 26, 2016 - 09:45 am:

I was 14 in 1963 and nuts about T's. Dad said he might help buy one, but it had to be a non-starter car, just to keep me off the road (so he thought). I hung around a guy who had one for sale and he took me over to a field and let me drive it - I was hooked deeper. He wanted $150 for the car and I convinced Dad to finance 1/2 of that - I had $75 saved. I then went to the owner, who told me the car was sold. I mentioned that I told him that I would buy it for $150 but he said sorry. I few days later he called to tell me the car was available. I found that he had initially sold the car for $100, but when I told him $150 he figured how to back out of the first deal and let me have it as my price was 50% over what he had sold it for. I still have the car, along with a couple others.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Schreiber- Santa Isabel Ecuador on Monday, December 26, 2016 - 10:59 am:

My first experience was in the mid 90's when we were displaying our commercial line of air cooled VW's at an annual antique truck show in Barrington, NH. After a few years they began letting in early cars. I got to talking with a long time T man who lived and had a shop on route 11 before the Alton traffic circle. He gave me a ride in his 13 runabout and I was hooked. Still heavily involved in the VW hobby I came across an ad for a 13 done up as a fire chiefs car in Orange, NH. It was advertised as $4500 so I drove up with $4k hoping to low ball him. His wife had made a mistake placing the ad and he was asking $5400. We never struck a deal so bought a Karmann Ghia convertible on the way back to Manchester. Fast forward to 2006 when we relocated to Aiken, SC. Wanting to get back into the VW scene again I soon discovered that what basket cases were now selling for is what I sold restored cars for. We already had a 50 Ford F1 and a 60 El Camino when I saw an ad for a 26 T roadster which turned out to be a 27 that was within my price range. Two more followed me home very quickly. They were all gone by early 2013 when we decided we wanted a new adventure during our golden years and moved to Ecuador. No regrets, it's all been fun :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Brough on Monday, December 26, 2016 - 11:52 am:

Three generations in front of my WWI Model T project. Using this 1915 as a learning curve for 1917 family restoration later this year. Good learning curve so far, rebuilt rear axle, overhauled engine, new carb, valve job, magneto refresh, flushed oil, flushed coolant, all electrical working, starts and runs on battery or magneto. Wooden body coming together this winter.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Tuesday, December 27, 2016 - 02:23 pm:

My first T experience must have been the summer of 1963. I had been a dyed-in-the-wool Model A guy for several months when I met Rich Bingham. I watched him "restore" his T with great interest. He took me to where there was one for sale and I bought it. We traded my Roadster body for his Touring body. Being in our teens with few resources but lots of imagination and energy we managed to have wonderful times getting those cars running. Some generous older fellows helped us with parts and instruction. It was a magical time unlike anything since. These old pictures are nearly as fuzzy as my memories.






Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham on Tuesday, December 27, 2016 - 05:02 pm:

Gosh Rich, we've all passed a lot of water since then . . .


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By brass car guy on Wednesday, December 28, 2016 - 12:03 am:

I got indoctrinated at the young age of 11 back in the early 50's. My father decided to get a model t and restore it with his kids to teach us about tools and mechanics.

As a kid in the early 50's I remember reading Popular Mechanics and following a young man restoring a model t roadster. This ran over a number of months and I could hardly wait for the next issue. 50+ years later I call that young man my friend, Herb Singe of New Jersey. He still has that t in his museum.

Like all hobbies my fathers collection soon got out of control. the 1st t, then the 2nd ,3rd, 4th and so on. Then he added real classics, many other brass era cars until it required a 10,000 sq ft building to house them. By this time both my brother and I were really hooked.

My 1st ever ride in t was that 1923 touring we all restored one winter. Once it was finished we all got to ride in it, my 1st t ride.

My father decided to let that '23 go because he wanted a "brass" t. In 1959 we restored a 1913 touring, from a nice complete barn fresh car.

We drove the '13 from Seattle to Sacramento for the National HCCA tour in the summer of 1959. After the tour we drove it back to Seattle. All told we put about 2100 miles on the'13. The only problems were loose spokes due to the dry climate and the need to adjust the low band. I remember stopping at a wrecking yard and got some old license plates. I had to cut them in horseshoe shapes to slip in between the fellow and the spoke nipples. We started out in Seattle with 3 t's by the time we got to Southern Oregon, we grew to 10 or 12 t's. Those were my 1st model t adventures, and ever since I have been hooked. Many restorations, t's bought and sold, some I should of kept but that's water under the bridge.

I still remember my 1st ride in the '23 and how the frame and body twisted and squirmed as it drove over the road and ground. I remember riding in the front seat of the '13 and thinking how short the hood was and how interesting the brass radiator looked out in front. I also remember my 1st time of cranking the '13 with the brass headlights lit. Of course I am a died in the wool right hand manly man cranker. I used to rest my left hand on the headlight bonnet when cranking. Well if you look real close you can still see the Jno Brown script in the palm of my hand, lesson learned.

just sayin'

brasscarguy


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roar Sand on Wednesday, December 28, 2016 - 08:25 pm:

In 1957 I entered my senior year of high school and started the quest for an old car to drive through the graduation festivities. I scoured the for sale ads in the newspaper for something I could afford. Went to look at a straight 8 Hudson convertible sedan, I think it was a 1929 or 1930 model. It had the potential for grand automobiling, but it needed more work than I had time for. The next one was a 1926 T Touring. The owner opened the garage doors, got in, as we stood outside and watched. He hit the starter, and when the engine caught, the car shook, if not wallowed back and forth, and we were sold. We "towed" it to my grandparents' house behind my dad's 1953 Beetle. I didn't know at the time that towing a T is a no, no, so it was fortunate that the engine was running in order to assist the 25 DIN horsepower Beetle on the hills. Turning into my grandparents' yard, things got a little hectic with the three pedals negotiating the sharp turn in between the stout fence posts, and we had a little "contact" between one of those and the left front fender. I paid 1100 Nkr, about $154, for the T.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Haynes, Lodi, CA on Thursday, December 29, 2016 - 10:23 am:

One nice spring day as I walked home from school (second grade), I saw the garage door up at a house about half way between the school and home. Inside was a spidery all black Model T runabout.

I walked to it, hypnotized, losing track of everything. It was immediately my favorite car in the world. I remember vaguely hearing voices, but I wasn't listening - there was a real Model T right there, right in front of me and it was so close to home. The voices grew more insistent until I realized they were angry shouts to get away or something. Two men, one young, one middle-aged, were wind-milling their arms, yelling at me to get back. Well, they didn't understand, I wouldn't have hurt it, I only wanted to stare at the car for a few hours! I kept walking toward the car.

They were not giving up; yelling and waving their arms away and pointing at the ground.

They had just poured a new concrete driveway and had not yet put any kind of barrier or tape up and I walked right into it. For about 40 years my little footprints led diagonally in a bee line off the sidewalk to the place where that Model T was parked. Then the house was sold and either the seller or buyer poured a skim texture coat on the driveway, obscuring my tracks. Over the next 10 or so years the texture coat has failed and flaked in spots and my little tracks are re-emerging.

I got to know the man and his son, they became good friends. The father forgave my trespass, the son not so much.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jake Mayne on Thursday, December 29, 2016 - 03:12 pm:

This past summer I helped my uncle get is hack going. He offered to teach me to drive a Model T-. After a quick lesson we were off driving around the mini storage compound which was comprised of long buildings in rows encompassed by buildings around the perimeter. Not a lot off long stretches for high gear but on one of the runs I got it in high gear. I missed the part of the lesson to get it out of high gear and just tried to step on the brake or one of the pedals. Anyway nothing seemed to work and that wall at the end of the run was fast approaching. I looked over at him and said, "any ideas? his reply was, " well you had better do something!" We stopped in time and a collision was avoided. Needless to say he ended up driving his T out to his house while I followed in his pickup truck.

My task has been to organize his warehouse and consolidate his TTs and Ts and T Tractor conversions. Now he can see all of his tractors and toys in one location warm and cozy.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jake Mayne on Thursday, December 29, 2016 - 03:19 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Duey_C on Saturday, December 31, 2016 - 12:56 am:

Dan, you said you saw "a spidery....Model T..." I first saw that when I was a little boy too and saw it again this year!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Warwick Landy Traralgon Australia on Saturday, December 31, 2016 - 05:01 pm:

1916 T
My olde3st T memory is attending this photo shoot with my Dad in his newly restored 1916 Touring. I think from that day on I have really loved T's. I have restored and owned several but the highlight is to now own that same car and drive it at every opportunity.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Martin Vowell, Sylmar, CA on Saturday, December 31, 2016 - 08:05 pm:

My first experience with a T was when my next door neighbor Ed Tate brought his 1921 Touring home from his storage building and I went over to look at it. He asked if I wanted a ride, and of course I said yes. We drove round the Chatsworth Reservoir (which at that time had water in it), the road around that lake is as a country like road as you can find in the West end of the SF Valley. Anyhoo, we drove round it and he explained how the car worked and which did what and why we had just went through the small town (and I do mean small) of Lake Manor and maybe a mile or so further...it's a 3 mile trip round the lake to where it joins Topanga Canyon Blvd. Ed stops the car just before we get to the blvd, turns the car around and tells me "you drive back". In that 3 miles of alternating hills, twisty and flat road he taught me to drive that T...I have been hooked ever since.

Went to the San Fernando Valley chapters swap meet one weekend with him and bought the beginnings of my car...a brake control lever, a steering column and a frame...all for $75.00. A lot of the parts for my car came from members of the SFV club, the engine I got from Don Bell, the rear axle from Chris Essgard (Billy Poobah...what a character), the front axle from David Wheeler, and a lot of neat stuff, fenders and the running boards from Ed Tate...Bill Rader I got my splash aprons and the hood, and everything else I got with the exception of the body from swap meets. I got the body from the same old guy whom I bought the frame from, where he got it he didn't say, but it was just what I was looking for...a touring and I paid $100.00 for it.





This is an older picture of my car, it now has upholstery and interior panels and I'm deciding on whether or not to actually buy a top kit or make one of my own...I have the plans for a "California Top" around here someplace...maybe I'll do that instead (if I ever find them) or I may just sew up a top for my car and go that route...sounds like a lot of work to some, but sounds like fun to me...and as you probably already know..."fun never quits!" :-)


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