Old Photo - Model T Era - Brand Blvd. In Glendale, Ca. 1926

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Old Photo - Model T Era - Brand Blvd. In Glendale, Ca. 1926
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Wednesday, December 28, 2016 - 09:45 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Wednesday, December 28, 2016 - 11:36 am:

That trolley went north to Burbank and south to Los Angeles. As you look at this picture you are looking north. When you got about a mile from downtown Los Angeles, you entered a tunnel and came out under the Subway Terminal Building. on Hill Street near 3rd St. The Broadway Department Store was right across the street. It was a big building which went between two streets. The other side of the department store was on Broadway. They were very well located, because the trains went to all the larger suburbs and in those days most shopping was downtown. Also a good way to commute to work. I can remember going with my grandmother and mother to Long Beach. We started in Glendale and transferred at the Subway Terminal. There was even a line to San Bernardino! My grandfather and his brothers built at least one station on the San Bernardino line. The station in Upland, Ca. After WWII the subway was abandoned and the transportation was changed to buses. Now in recent years parts of the Trolley system have been restored.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Wednesday, December 28, 2016 - 11:44 am:

We had one of the best interurban rail systems in the world, and the politicians made us get rid of it. Now they want it back, but it will never be the same.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kirk Peterson on Wednesday, December 28, 2016 - 12:04 pm:

I first saw the map of the rail system at the LA natural history museum 40 years ago. Pretty impressive even went out to the Valley


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Wednesday, December 28, 2016 - 12:30 pm:

Cool pic! Is that a "cab over" stake truck? Can't tell with my phone.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Wednesday, December 28, 2016 - 12:56 pm:

It was the largest transit system in the world. A cabal of business interests combined with shifting public preferences ended it. I don't believe in vast conspiracies, but in this case there really was one, hatched by GM, Firestone, Standard Oil of California, Phillips Petroleum, and others. More and more people chose to drive, a trend which had been going on for decades. The end was hastened when those businesses, through a front company, bought up the rail lines and converted them to buses. Hundreds of rail cars were dumped in the ocean.


Glendale line entering the subway tunnel to downtown Los Angeles.


Subway terminal building. There was also a PE red car station on Main Street.


Pacific Electric Building


Future fish houses


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Wednesday, December 28, 2016 - 01:13 pm:

That P.E. building is gorgeous. Standing the test of time. Today's new construction is lucky to last 30 years. At least it's being repurposed into rental lofts. That's a shame about all those trolleys stacked up waiting to become fish shanty's!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Wednesday, December 28, 2016 - 03:00 pm:

That's what Americans do, crap all over their own history for the
sake of being trendy, then realizing after all the cool stuff was destroyed
that they made a mistake. In keeping with their ill sense of propriety,
they might replace the original subject matter, but never do it with
a genuine recreation of the original. Rather, some plastic, turd-shaped
modern idea.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Bohlen, Severn MD on Wednesday, December 28, 2016 - 03:15 pm:

Larry & Burger,

This is a subject that boils my blood.
However, it was not the politicians that were to blame but the supposed "free market".
It was a famous conspiracy.

Here is the info:
The General Motors streetcar conspiracy refers to convictions of General Motors (GM) and other companies for monopolizing the sale of buses and supplies to National City Lines and its subsidiaries, and to allegations that this was part of a deliberate plot to purchase and dismantle streetcar systems in many cities in the United States as an attempt to monopolize surface transportation, and to urban legends and other folklore inspired by these events.

Between 1938 and 1950, National City Lines and its subsidiaries, American City Lines and Pacific City Linesówith investment from GM, Firestone Tire, Standard Oil of California through a subsidiary, Federal Engineering, Phillips Petroleum, and Mack Trucksógained control of additional transit systems in about 25 cities.[3] Systems included St. Louis, Baltimore, Los Angeles, and Oakland. NCL often converted streetcars to bus operations in that period, although electric traction was preserved or expanded in some locations. Other systems, such as San Diego's, were converted by outgrowths of the City Lines. Most companies involved were convicted in 1949 of conspiracy to monopolize interstate commerce in the sale of buses, fuel, and supplies to NCL subsidiaries, but were acquitted of conspiring to monopolize the transit industry.

Only a handful of U.S. cities have surviving legacy rail urban transport systems based on streetcars, including Newark, Cleveland, Philadelphia, San Francisco, Pittsburgh, New Orleans, and Boston; others are re-introducing them. In many of these cases, the "streetcars" do not actually ride on the street. Boston had all of its downtown lines elevated, or buried, by the mid-1920s, and most of the surviving lines at grade operate on their own right of way. San Francisco and Newark similarly use tunnels; SEPTA (Philadelphia) has greatly trimmed streetcar lines to a handful using the Center City Tunnel.

My understanding is the judge imposed the maximum fine for the case they were found guilty of....$5,000.

He should have also made them put it all back the way they found it.
We are always so ready to scrap the past to make way for the Future. Also, look up Robert Moses and all the fun he had in New York City with no consideration of history or neighborhoods.

Larry


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Wednesday, December 28, 2016 - 03:19 pm:

Larry,

If I appoint you Benevolent Dictator, can we start beheadings tomorrow ? :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Bohlen, Severn MD on Wednesday, December 28, 2016 - 03:31 pm:

I have always preferred

Emperor of the Known Universe


The spice must flow!

:-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Wednesday, December 28, 2016 - 03:36 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Wednesday, December 28, 2016 - 07:36 pm:

You guys are great! Wonderful photos and good information
Nothing new about corruption. It just keeps getting worse. I have been banging my head against that brick wall most of my life. Eventually, We the People will have to change that. Or else.
Thank you all!
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James A. Lightfoot on Wednesday, December 28, 2016 - 08:24 pm:

Hello Jay, I want to thank you for your posting of the Glendale,CA of main Street Brand Blvd. My family moved to Glendale from Washington in 1951. I can remember the Trolley Car's. And going to the theatre in the upper right side of the picture. In those days there was a curfew and people of color had to be out of town by 6pm. It was known as "Whitie" Now day most of Brand Blvd. is mostly Armenians. Myself and my friends would climb to the top of the mountains in the background to look over the smog to see Catalina Island. Many thanks for the memories. Jim in Colorado..


Add a Message


This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Username:  
Password:

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration