Jalopy's End - Life Magazine 1939

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Jalopy's End - Life Magazine 1939
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mundinho Falcao on Wednesday, December 28, 2016 - 06:27 pm:

Looks like aftermarket headlights.

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=CkkEAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA72&lpg=PA72&dq=jalopys+en d+life+magazine&source=bl&ots=vo-4AGp0HY&sig=bavwX_GV5pEItohqXwI9V3NvgY8&hl=en&s a=X&ved=0ahUKEwj_t5KfhJjRAhVMObwKHQ4yDSkQ6AEIGTAA#v=onepage&q=jalopys%20end%20li fe%20magazine&f=false


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Wednesday, December 28, 2016 - 08:02 pm:

Mundinho,

It does not appear to be a Model T Ford, although many cars back then had similar shapes. Note the disc wheels, drum head lamps, vacuum tank for the gasoline etc. I would guess and it is only a guess - that it is a Chevy.



The photo is from the Google Books link you posted above. I looked for, but I did not find their notice to post with their information. But Google has done a great job digitizing so many of the books etc. Thank you Google!

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mundinho Falcao on Wednesday, December 28, 2016 - 08:16 pm:

Thanks Hap, I can see it's not a Ford now.

Whatever it is it looks too good to drive off a cliff for ten bucks!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Sullivan on Wednesday, December 28, 2016 - 09:19 pm:

Didn't them bowties always have six lug bolts? Dave in Bellingham, WA


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Wednesday, December 28, 2016 - 10:24 pm:

David, except for the valve stem hole, Chev rims will interchange with T rims for much of the 20's, so they were 4 bolt types. I don't know about the later 20s with smaller tyres.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By dale w on Wednesday, December 28, 2016 - 10:49 pm:

1926 Chevrolet- stock headlights


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marv Konrad (Green Bay Area) on Wednesday, December 28, 2016 - 11:22 pm:

According to the written article with the picture, it is identified as a 1923. Bought for $20, the SoCal HS boys kept it running for their summer, then charged 25 cents/adults and 10 cents for kids, to let them watch it drive over a cliff. They sold the wreckage to a junk yard, making a $10 profit for their joint venture.....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Clayton Swanson on Thursday, December 29, 2016 - 12:02 pm:

when i was a kid they would put a car on the frozen lake and then try to guess when it would fall thru in the spring melt. winner would get some prize. "dunk the clunk" they called it, too much fun for this modern world today


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Thursday, December 29, 2016 - 12:16 pm:

Is it just me, or do others really hate destructive amusement ?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham on Thursday, December 29, 2016 - 01:26 pm:

Even accounting for inflation, it's amazing how cheap "old" cars were just before WW II. My Dad bought a '29 Plymouth for $7.50 in 1939. It's also a little hard to absorb what perceptions of the older models were back then. Consider how rapid the styling changed between 1930 and 1940 ! Another "factor" was how short the service intervals were back then. If you could get 20,000 miles before an "overhaul" (usually valves and re-ring) that was good. Most cars were considered "worn out" at 50,000 mi.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By dale w on Thursday, December 29, 2016 - 09:01 pm:

During WWII my dad was "4F" (broken legs as a kid that weren't set straight) so he worked county scrap drives and they would commonly get 5 year old cars (1937) that were already worn out and abandoned to the fence rows. Until war shortages caused a demand for well- used civilian cars, most anything over 10 years old could be easily bought for under 20.oo, and he said they often hauled out and cut up 30 cars a week- half of them Model Ts, with Model As running a close second. If a really nice Desoto or Lincoln or Ford V8 came in, they might take the plate off of their vehicle and drive it for a day or two if it still had decent tyres.
They also made a pretty penny selling non-rationed, semi-combustionable, highly questionable used gasoline from all those old scrapped tanks- once they filled their own trucks and tractors up!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Thursday, December 29, 2016 - 11:15 pm:

Burger, I'm with you!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Sullivan on Thursday, December 29, 2016 - 11:30 pm:

I too, am with Burger on this. Don't think that's a Chevy though, ain't enough bolts holding the wheel to the hub, mostly six. Dave in Bellingham,WA


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