How to remove a top bow?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: How to remove a top bow?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Thursday, December 29, 2016 - 10:52 am:


I want to get this broken top socket out for repair. The arrow points to where the top bow fits into the socket. I hope somebody who has done this can advise on how to get the two pieces apart. They're pretty tightly joined.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Townsend ; ^ ) Gresham, Orygun on Thursday, December 29, 2016 - 11:22 am:

Steve-
Originally the top bow was attached to the top socket with friction and one nail on each side. If it was put together with epoxy or anything like that you will have trouble getting it apart.

: ^ )


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Andre Valkenaers on Thursday, December 29, 2016 - 11:28 am:

Steve,
I did the bows on a 1914 runabout that was under water for two days.
At each side of every bow I found two small nails that were hard to see due to the paint and other stuff to make them nearly unvisible. Maybe it is the same way at your bows.

Andre
Belgium


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Thursday, December 29, 2016 - 11:48 am:

I've had to use a 12" long 1/4" diameter drill bit to remove enough of the bow to loosen it in the socket so that it can be removed. Other times I just rap the sides of the socket a few times with a rubber mallet and it slides out easily.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By R.V. Anderson on Thursday, December 29, 2016 - 12:33 pm:

If you are certain that all fasteners holding the bow in have been removed, drill a 31/64" hole all the way through the bow, 1-1/4" above the socket. Drive in a piece of 1/2" bar stock so that you have about 1" protruding on either side. Drive against the bar stock with a hammer, alternating sides, and the bow should come out. Drive out the bar stock and glue in a 1/2" dowel flush with both sides of the bow. It won't be seen since the bow is covered with cloth right down to the socket.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Thursday, December 29, 2016 - 04:02 pm:

Steve, this will work if you don't have to save the bow. Use an oxy torch to heat the metalwork enough to char the wood inside. This will also negate any epoxy that may have been used.If all the fixing nails are removed, it will not take long to have it loose. Then you can make your weld repairs to the metal socket. This process also helps to loosen internal rust, making for a better surface for rust treatment.

Hope this helps.
Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Thursday, December 29, 2016 - 04:09 pm:

Steve, your photo shows wood on both sides of the break. It is not usual to have the timber that deep in the socket. The following will allow you to get the wood out. Heat the socket with an oxy torch to char the wood inside. It will not take long to have it loose. A screw in the end will allow you to pull it out. If you do not have to save the bow, the same procedure will allow the removal of the top part also. The heat will also negate the possible use of epoxy and also loosen any internal rust, making for a better treatment of the rusted interior of the socket.

Hope this helps.
Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Thursday, December 29, 2016 - 05:47 pm:

Actually, that's not wood inside the break. It's some kind of plastic or resin.






I removed the paint and found no trace of any nails or other fasteners near the top bow. I applied heat, hoping the socket would expand and slip off. Nope. It still won't budge. I suspect one of the rivets is holding it, and I'll have to remove them to get it off. I didn't try drilling out the wood, because the bow seems fine, other than being stuck. I really don't want to ruin the bow and have to get a new one.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By R.V. Anderson on Thursday, December 29, 2016 - 09:09 pm:

Steve, the method I outlined is designed to save the bow. Just don't use any bar stock that is substantially smaller than 1/2" as it will tend to split the bow along the grain.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Thursday, December 29, 2016 - 10:01 pm:

Before I do that I think I'd better get the rivets out. As tight-stuck as that thing is, at last one of the rivets must be holding it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By R.V. Anderson on Friday, December 30, 2016 - 11:23 am:

Quite possibly, even likely, but it's amazing how tight a tapered fit can be, especially if the wood absorbs a bit of moisture and swells.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tony Bowker, Ramona, CA on Friday, December 30, 2016 - 11:34 am:

On my 14 Touring the wood bow was held by two screws under the cloth at the top end of the bow. I don't remember the rivet for the support running thru the wood, that certainly complicates the situation. I guess it has to be removed. From the pictures it looks like the bow has been repaired previously. I would recommend a whole new bow.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Friday, December 30, 2016 - 11:53 am:

R.V's comment about swelling points to a possible approach. If you remove all the offending rivets & nails and the bow is still stuck tight, try heating the socket with a hair dryer or a heat gun from a distance (you don't want to burn off the paint!).

This will do two things - expand the socket, and dry out the wood so that it will (hopefully)shrink a bit. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Friday, December 30, 2016 - 12:10 pm:

No worry about burning the paint. I stripped it off looking for nails, which aren't there (see photo above). I heated the thing with both heat gun and mapp gas. No go. That's what makes me suspect the wood may extend into the socket far enough for at least the first rivet to hold it.

A friend who is a body man tells me the socket can be fixed stronger than new, so if I can get it off I'll let him have a go at it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Friday, December 30, 2016 - 11:33 pm:

Steve, I think you'll find the nails on the inside part of the bow, but I agree, it appears the wood may be locked in by the rivets. Hmm, maybe because of the rivets, the nails weren't used?


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