Driving a T at -60C (-76F) ?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Driving a T at -60C (-76F) ?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Constantine on Thursday, December 29, 2016 - 01:10 pm:

First read this:

http://siberiantimes.com/other/others/news/n0830-biting-cold-below-minus-50c-bri ngs-out-the-best-in-siberian-face-fashion/

It got me thinking...back in the day people would have used their Ts and T snowmobiles in very cold conditions. So to drive a T in such conditions what modifications would you need to make?

Could the leaf springs or pan ears snap if you hit a large pot-hole? Doesn't metal become brittle at low temperatures?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Thursday, December 29, 2016 - 01:24 pm:

I would think at that temp. without the engine having a block heater it would never start. The oil would be so thick even jacking up a wheel wouldn't help. Bring out old Dobbin!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Cliff Colee on Thursday, December 29, 2016 - 01:26 pm:

Maybe they used a lighter lubricant...water?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rich Bingham on Thursday, December 29, 2016 - 01:33 pm:

Fairly common lore from "the old days" around here, where it gets down to -25F in a normal winter, was to build a fire under the oil pan. (Don't ask me how many may have been set plumb on fire - I don't know) Another tactic was to fill the radiator with boiling water. I know, possibly crack the head or block. Any road, with a little successful (?) warming, once running, no problem. Alcohol was the anti-freeze used before the advent of ethelyne glycol, and in really cold temps, a must to keep the water from freezing in the radiator even while running. Winterfronts to cover all or part of the radiator were popular, as was disconnecting the fan.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Constantine on Thursday, December 29, 2016 - 02:14 pm:

Tim, maybe 0w20 oil might be okay? see:

https://www.walmart.com/ip/Mobil-1-0W-20-Advanced-Fuel-Economy-Full-Synthetic-Mo tor-Oil-5-qt./17034374

You could also drain the oil and coolant and keep indoors then refill in the morning just before starting together with a fire (or heater) under the pan. Primer plugs might be a help and perhaps heating the intake manifold with a flame.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dallas landers on Thursday, December 29, 2016 - 02:48 pm:

I can remamber when I was a kid,my dad would take the ash pan from the wood stove full of hot coals and put it under the oil pan to get his cars started in winter. That was in northern Michigan. Not a T of course but oil is oil.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James G Fisher III Peachtree City, GA on Thursday, December 29, 2016 - 02:59 pm:

My question is why the Siberian Times? And why is it in english?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob from Nova Scotia on Thursday, December 29, 2016 - 06:14 pm:

I heard of guys draining the oil out of old cars and keeping it warm inside


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Freighter Jim on Thursday, December 29, 2016 - 06:33 pm:

Water was drained at night.

Fire was made under oil pan & rear diff.

I have had to do it to my F350 CC 7.3 Duallies.

Also on tractors I have hauled in extreme winter conditions
that had water in the rear diff and/or gear box.

I have picked up tractors in Winter years when I did not know better in areas of the north where if you turned off your diesel engine to fuel & go pay inside - good luck trying to start back up again ....

Some days you just don't leave home ..


Freighter Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown North Central Arkansas on Thursday, December 29, 2016 - 07:00 pm:

Hi Constantine, Is it that cold where you are now. ?? If so, you need to come back to Arkansas. :-) Its been in 50s to 70s degree range during the day. Like Jim said "some days you just don't leave home".


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Thursday, December 29, 2016 - 07:11 pm:

Come to think of it, I like the idea of just staying home even better! Actually not safe out in those temps anyway.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Constantine on Friday, December 30, 2016 - 04:30 am:

Donnie, not cold where I am, around +30F during the day.

Seems the best oil for these evil conditions could be Redline synthetic 0w20 oil with a pour point of -60C/-76F, see:

http://highperformancejunkies.com/technical-articles/synthetic-oils/0w20-oil-com parison/

James, why Siberian Times English? No idea but I've heard that US patriot Edward Snowden does like starting the day with a English language broadsheet together with black caviar pancakes and a shot of Armenian cognac...as CNN keeps on saying it's a hard life in Russia...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Deichmann, Blistrup, Denmark on Friday, December 30, 2016 - 05:27 am:

Some places they just keep the diesels running idle all night. If they stop they'll never get them going until summer.....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Whelihan Danbury, WI on Friday, December 30, 2016 - 08:02 am:

My grandfather told me as a kid about all the people who had coal stoves in their garages, as well as those who used to put coal/ember fired heaters under the oil pans of their cars, plus adding a heavy horse blanket over the hoods of engines to get the cars going in the morning. He also told me with a chuckle they regularly had a spike in the number of garage fires all winter as well. Walking to the trolley stop or hooking up the horse to a sleigh was probably a better option.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Bamford, Edmonton AB on Friday, December 30, 2016 - 10:06 am:

There was a morning in Dec 09 when our International Airport reported the second-lowest temperature in the world, ahead only of some Siberian outpost.

It was a little warmer here in town at -35C/-31F when I saddled up the '26 Touring to go visit a friend. After 90 minutes at his place the engine would barely turn over with the starter. We had to pull the car down the alley to get it going.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Friday, December 30, 2016 - 10:25 am:

Mercury freezes solid at 37.89 degrees F or 38.83 C. BURRRRRRRRRRR!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rick J. Gunter -- Sparta, Missouri, USA on Friday, December 30, 2016 - 10:26 am:

When it gets that cold, you better add an additive to the gasoline to keep it from freezing. In the far north, airplanes have been known to crash because the gas lines froze during flight.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Harper - Keene, NH on Friday, December 30, 2016 - 10:46 am:

Hi Chris,

-35*C, wow. It does not often get that chilly here. Negative twenties Fahrenheit once or twice a winter has been seen. I commend your hardiness. I drove my touring almost 200 miles one February. It was 10*F when I started out and warmed to a balmy 30* by the time I reached my destination though it was cooler when I returned home.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Codman on Friday, December 30, 2016 - 10:51 am:

Humans were not designed for -76 F.
Some years ago I talked to an Alaskan bush pilot who said that in most cases when his airplane had to be left outside in the winter, he would drain the oil into a metal container that he carried for that purpose (Most piston aircraft have quick-drains that don't require tools). The still warm oil would be kept near the fireplace or stove until he needed the airplane again. He would pour the warm oil into the engine and it would usually start right up. He would also bring the battery inside.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By R.V. Anderson on Friday, December 30, 2016 - 11:04 am:

I've read that standard brake fluid won't function properly in really cold temps, so in Russia's far north they use vodka in place of it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Friday, December 30, 2016 - 12:49 pm:

RV. The vodka went inside the Russian!
Enough of it and they didn't care if the brakes worked.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Freighter Jim on Friday, December 30, 2016 - 09:30 pm:

In the mid 80's I worked as an industrial electrician in Wyoming Winter.

PCC (Project Construction Corporation) was building the La Barge Shute Creek plant.

Kemmerer, WY was the closest town at 33 miles away.

The day I arrived to start - they found (3) guys frozen dead in their car that went off the road into the plant.

All equipment was left running 24/7 - just shut down long enough to service it.

It was a T & M job - we would work for 15 minutes outside - then spend 15 minutes warming up in our plastic hooch by the propane bullet heaters.

Working 7 -12's was an experience.

That job and working off shore on the Shell oil platform Emmy out of Long Beach Harbor on a re-tool were my favorite industrial electrician experiences.


Freighter Jim


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