Fixing a few things on a spare 1915 engine

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: Fixing a few things on a spare 1915 engine
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Friday, December 30, 2016 - 08:16 pm:

This engine is the original engine from my 1915 touring. The serial number is 733122, the casting date is March 17, 1915. It was most recently in the '14 touring, having been in that car since the early 1990's. A cracked drum meant it had to come out of the car. However it was running great. It just needs to be fixed up, not completely rebuilt.

The last time we saw it was when I got it out of the '14 back in February. The 1914's current (real 1914) engine is on the right:



This was the problem:


So it had to come apart. I pulled the lower pulley, engine pan and the front cover last weekend. Next the engine was rotated nose down on the engine stand so the transmission could be removed from the flywheel. I left the flywheel on the engine for convenience since the crankshaft and pistons are not being disturbed.







I really dodged a bullet. The drum had the visible crack (yellow arrows), but it also was cracked across the web of the gear. It was one more crack away from letting go and trashing the whole engine.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Friday, December 30, 2016 - 08:29 pm:

A quick trip to the spare parts box and I found a near perfect low drum. It had a new bushing in it,



I bought this at Chickasha a few years ago from Bill Barth. All it needed was to finish hone the bushing for clearance.







After honing a little at a time until the desired clearance was achieved the drum was installed and the sun gear pressed back on the shaft. With the timing marks on the triple gears aimed at the center of teeth on the sun gears we safety wire the set in place to keep it in time.



The transmission is set back on the shafts and then the safety wire needs to be removed so you don't forget about it. Yes I measured all the pins and checked the triple gear bushings for wear, they were all within limits. Not bad for an engine with 25+ years of operation and tens of thousands of miles.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Friday, December 30, 2016 - 08:30 pm:

Glad you caught it in time! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Friday, December 30, 2016 - 08:36 pm:

I checked the clutch spring. It is weak and short so a new one is installed and the old one is in the trash.



With the clutch spring compressed the driven plate is installed.



With the plate bolted down the clutch fingers are adjusted to 13/16". A Ford 1/2" RH lug nut is used as a go / no - go gage. Then the fingers are cotter pinned and the bolts are safety wired.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Friday, December 30, 2016 - 08:42 pm:

With the transmission buttoned up I turned to the engine. I removed the cylinder head and valve springs. Then the lifters can be pinned up using the keeper pins from the valves. The camshaft was then removed. I tossed the fiber timing gear in the trash.



The lifters join the valves and valve springs on the parts organizer.



With the camshaft removed and the lifters out the engine is flipped on its back. Amazing how clean it is for being in service since the early 1980's.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Hanson on Friday, December 30, 2016 - 08:46 pm:

Thank you for posting these photos. They are very helpful for understanding the process.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Friday, December 30, 2016 - 09:10 pm:

This afternoon I spent a lot of time cleaning the engine pan, valve covers, front cover, all the bolts, and removing carbon from the pistons. Then I started digging out parts that needed to be replaced from my spares.

The front pulley was loose several years ago so I installed it with JB Weld. That worked fine, but there was a new cast iron pulley hanging around that needs a home.




Gaskets and a new aluminum cam gear get in line.



I have a Stipe 280 camshaft and an aluminum head coming. Lots more work to do while waiting for the box from Langs.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Noonan - Norton, MA. on Friday, December 30, 2016 - 09:41 pm:

Looks great Royce. What's the story with the counterweight setup you have installed on your crankshaft?, I've never seen that before.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Friday, December 30, 2016 - 09:46 pm:

Royce, am I correct in assuming that you will be leaving the bolt-on counterweights installed on the crank?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Friday, December 30, 2016 - 11:39 pm:

Looking good Royce! Is this engine going back into your '15 touring?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Warwick Landy Traralgon Australia on Saturday, December 31, 2016 - 12:14 am:

That "Parts organiser" is a great looking device for engine rebuilds. Is it KRW,Ford or your design? Very nice. Are the counter weights DUNN type? I have not seen anyone employ these bolt on weights with any real success. They have Obviously worked well for you. Can you detail your set up process. Thanks and all the best for 2017!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Saturday, December 31, 2016 - 09:23 am:

Those are reproduction "Dunn" counterweights. The crank was balanced with them installed, so they are part of the package. This engine also had the flywheel / magnet assembly balanced. It is quite smooth.

The valvetrain parts organizer is made by Crane cams company. There are several companies making and selling similar ones.

This engine will eventually end up in my '15 because that is where it belongs. It might be used in the '10 this spring. I am thinking about using the '10 in a tour and if so it will need a better engine and a Ruckstell while the original components get a full blown restoration.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Menzies on Saturday, December 31, 2016 - 02:58 pm:

Question/point I recently assembled a 15 and the clutch finger screws protrude about 1/2" out of the clutch finger where the cotter pin goes through. There are a total of 26 pieces inserted in the clutch 13 small thrust plates, 13 large thrust plates and one distance plate. With all these components installed the clutch finger screws are out about 1/2". In your photos the finger screws are at least 1/2" lower? Do you have all the discs and distance plate installed?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Menzies on Saturday, December 31, 2016 - 03:03 pm:

I meant to say 27 pieces total


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Noonan - Norton, MA. on Saturday, December 31, 2016 - 03:15 pm:

David, you should have a total of 25. 12 small and 13 large for the stock Ford discs. Hope this helps


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Saturday, December 31, 2016 - 07:07 pm:

David yours looks wrong to me. Those clutch screws are normally flush or a bit down. You must have way too much stuff in there. The safety wire technique is awry too.

If the transmission is truly a '15 it will use 12 of the 3328 small discs and 13 of the 3329 large discs like John says. There is no distance plate in the '15 clutch.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Sunday, January 01, 2017 - 01:13 am:

David, that safety wire in the foreground is all wrong--if it loosens up ,it will just carry the wire over the top of the bolt. If the wire were under the one going into the bolt, it would work.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Menzies on Sunday, January 01, 2017 - 04:43 am:

I agree the wire is not correct I will fix it.
I have a 1915 parts book and it calls for 13 #3328 small thrust plates and 13 #3329 large thrust plates plus a distance plate. This is a reprint of an original 1915 parts book. I had this discussion some time ago on the forum regarding the thrust plate arrangement and it was brought to my attention that in mid 1916 the distance plate and one small thrust plate was discontinued. Therefore a 1915 could be configured either way. When I acquired the 1915 transmission that I have it had 13 small and 13 large thrust plates plus a distance plate. That is consistent with the 1915 parts book I have. This is a Canadian model and maybe they are different?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank van Ekeren (Australia) on Sunday, January 01, 2017 - 07:00 am:

David
Canadian parts book, 3328x12 used on cars below C65000 engine #,s


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Menzies on Sunday, January 01, 2017 - 02:02 pm:

Here are some pictures of my source of information, where have I errored? popjpeg{709026,}


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Menzies on Sunday, January 01, 2017 - 02:08 pm:

I will try again


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Menzies on Sunday, January 01, 2017 - 02:35 pm:

Frank engine #C65000 would place about mid 1916. That is right at the time the distance plate and one small thrust plate were discontinued.(as per learned on the forum) Is it possible that engine numbers after #C65000 had the 12 and 13 arrangement and less the distance plate?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Menzies on Sunday, January 01, 2017 - 02:46 pm:

I have two 1915 transmissions one in a rolling chassis and one spare. The rolling chassis unit is very responsive and smooth with the 13 X 13 arrangement. There have been questions on some posts where the adjusting screws were at the bottom of the adjusting finger with no more travel. This would indicate to me that there was not enough material in side.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank van Ekeren (Australia) on Sunday, January 01, 2017 - 03:38 pm:

David, I think you are right, all my early parts books say 13x13 and that the later ones 13x12.
Maybe that #C65000 in the overseas books, should read as after instead of before.
I have early T's and rebuilt for others but can't remember the count first hand as I don't use the original clutch set-ups on rebuilds, your set screws do seem to be out a long way but if all is set and working correctly, so be it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Menzies on Thursday, January 05, 2017 - 09:36 pm:

From a mechanical point of view, if the adjusting screws were designed with 3/8" worth of travel it would seem reasonable that the intent was to have 3/8" available, it would seem somewhat unreasonable to design 3/8" of travel and only use the last 1/16" - 1/8" of remaining adjustment.
With the 27 pieces inside the clutch there is still 1/16" clearance from the top of the clutch drum. One poster assembled a transmission and ended up with no adjustment remaining on the screws.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Severn - SE Texas on Thursday, January 05, 2017 - 11:53 pm:

Just as a note, when I took my April 16 transmission apart, it had the distance plate installed.

Bill


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Menzies on Saturday, January 07, 2017 - 04:09 pm:

I rewired my transmission it only took about five trys to get it right.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Saturday, January 07, 2017 - 07:22 pm:

My transmission is actually 1919 or so. Still waiting on cam bearings so this protect can get moving again.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Saturday, January 14, 2017 - 01:26 pm:

David - I dug out an original 1914 Canadian transmission that I have in my spares stash. It looks exactly like yours, so I suspect that yours is correct, as this was a good working engine. It makes sense too, the clutch screws are backed up to accommodate the distance plate and the extra disc thickness.

I learn something every day.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Saturday, January 14, 2017 - 01:47 pm:

Getting back to the job again after receiving a box of parts via UPS that were lost for a couple days due to a minor snow storm last week.

The vendors all sell a newly made reproduction cam bearing set. I had not previously used them so this is a chance to see how well they were made. Alas I was disappointed.

The new Stipe cam is made to use a 1926 - 27 front cam bearing, as this can be retrofitted to earlier engines easily. I had some late front bearings but the Babbitt was too worn in all of them. Upon receiving the new front bearing it was immediately apparent there was a problem because the length was too long to fit in between the front flange and the first cam lobe of the new Stipe cam. I checked the Stipe cam against an original '26 - 27 cam and it measured exactly the same in all dimensions checked.



So the bearing is too long. I measured from the back of the lobe to the front of the cam finding it is 1.790" inside dimension.



Meanwhile the cam bearing shell measures 1.81".



This is a problem that needs careful consideration before cutting because the front cam bearing is the thrust surface for the timing gear. The bearing is located by the bearing pin in the block. Any changes need to be made so that the timing gear indexes properly in the block. If it is too far forward or to the rear it will wear out the gears rapidly, and also affect the timer roller or brush position negatively. So I was relieved to find out that the pin hole measurement to rear face of the bearing shell was correct. That meant only one end of the cam bearing shell needed to be cut.

Next I decided it would be a good idea to check the outside diameter to see why the bearing would not fit into the cam tunnel in the block. First we measure the opening using a telescoping gage and a caliper.



The cam bore in the block measures 1.374".



Measuring the bearing shells we find they are too big at 1.385". Sigh.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Tomaso - Longbranch,WA on Saturday, January 14, 2017 - 01:55 pm:

I've used several of the available new bearings Royce but hadn't the issue of the O.D. of the shell being too large for the block bore ? I have had to "shorten" the new bearings in the lathe though.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Saturday, January 14, 2017 - 02:02 pm:

I could have ordered a set of re - babitted cam bearings directly from Ron's Machine Shop in Cincinnati, but I wanted to get the project back on the road again. This meant spending the time to fix all the off kilter machine work.

Since the camshaft has to be located in the center of the cam bore in the block I elected to use an extra camshaft as a fixture to be able to cut all the surfaces on the lathe. I set up the cam with a live center. I used two 1/8" strips of 3M Fine Line masking tape to lock up the bearing on the camshaft. The Fine Line tape measures about .001". I should mention the reproduction bearings have excellent Babbitt appearance and the bores are the proper dimension. A hose clamp was used to secure the bearing shell to the center of the camshaft after it was found to be running true using a dial indicator.



Because of the hose clamp I could only cut one half of the bearing OD at a time. It is slow work, you have to take little cuts to avoid going too far. The final dimensions are critical and there is no way to put metal back once it has been removed.



I could have set up a lube spray but it makes a big mess for a relatively small job. I elected to drip oil manually as it cut. An old cake pan is below the work to catch much of the iron / oil slurry.



Once the first half was done I had to swap the hose clamp and cut the other OD.



Then the tool holder was rotated around so I could face off the end of the bearing to get the proper dimension there.



All told, about 5 hours spent fixing the new cam bearings.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Saturday, January 14, 2017 - 02:04 pm:

Steve,

I am going to order re - babbited original ones next time.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Eddie on Saturday, January 14, 2017 - 03:01 pm:

Royce, Your broken drum looks very familiar, I am in the process of replacing mine. Just wondering what caused your drum failure?
In my case it was self inflicted as I am running Kevlar bands which I had set up too tight.....expensive way to learn a lesson.

Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Albert Lemon on Saturday, January 14, 2017 - 05:05 pm:

Damn, I'd give anything to know just half as much as you "ol' timers". Shoulda made this transition 20 years ago when I made a decent paycheck vs SS. I read every word of the Forum postings and envy you more knowledgeable people. It's sooo interesting and thank god you guys are willing to share your knowledge. On a serious note, what's a novise person and I'll bet there are a bunch of us, suppose to do in a situation like this ??? I think I'd have to sell the farm !!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Sunday, January 15, 2017 - 02:32 am:

John, your comment about the "transition' rings true here. I saw the writing on the wall and was pretty certain my job as curator would be knocked to 1/2 time to save the city money--about 24 of our jobs were on the block within the year. So I purchased all the parts I figured I'd need to get Barney really road-worthy and comfortable. Well, I was wrong, my job was cut to 0 Hours. So I have been unemployed, then re-started my old Piano tuning business (another "growing" trade--NOT!). So now I guess I'm semi-retired and self-employed and so far can't find the time to work on Barney!! First thing I have to do is finish the house remodel, then I can "play" with my Ts. In the next year I'll be on Medicare and likely SS too. Fixed income! Or rather "unfixed!"
Oh, and my "retirement entertainment income" from selling all my "stuff" I've accumulated over the years? The market has pretty much disappeared (died?). So much for THAT plan.
So yes, I'd imagine quite a few of us are in the same situation. Heck, when my ship comes in, I'll likely be at the train station!
:-) (Smile, it makes others wonder what you're up to!)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Sunday, January 15, 2017 - 09:08 am:

Dave Eddie,

The drum had been turned down on the outside which weakens it, effectively turning a good drum with some cosmetic defects into a totally worn out drum that is shiny. It had Kevlar bands in it but drums were failing long before Kevlar ever became a band material. It would have failed regardless of the band material.

John and David D,

Well I had the choice of returning the bearings to a vendor and ordering a set from somewhere else and waiting another week, or spending a day playing in the garage and then being able to finish assembly today. I am blessed to have all the wonderful equipment left to me by my family, it is a privilege to be able to use it for what it has always done.

I do intend to call Steven Lang tomorrow and ask him to please fix the problem with his vendor. I bet he gets it right.

Time to get back to the garage, we have to knock off early for the Cowboys game later today.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eric Hylen- Central Minnesota on Sunday, January 15, 2017 - 09:30 am:

Royce,
That lathe bed and saddle looks familiar. Is it a Sheldon M series?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Sunday, January 15, 2017 - 10:34 am:

Eric,

Good eye!





Used to be good things coming from Chicago. Not so much any more.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eric Hylen- Central Minnesota on Sunday, January 15, 2017 - 11:41 am:

Cool! On the recommendation of a friend who's a retired machinist, I picked one up at an auction last summer. Mine is a TME1236. The ways are good, but it needed a little work, so we're going through it and bringing it up to snuff before I put it into service. It's a well built machine, much better than most of the crap available today.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Monday, January 16, 2017 - 02:08 am:

Eric,
Good eye, I thought it looked awfully familiar, I have a Sheldon also, either pre-war or '46 production, I believe. Very few hours on mine too!
And yes, the shop is rather in disarray right now.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Monday, January 16, 2017 - 09:19 am:

Are the new cam bearings also out of round? About three years ago Mike Bender showed me his fixture for squishing unround ones into shape.




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Monday, January 16, 2017 - 10:03 am:

They were not out of round Steve. Just too big!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Monday, January 16, 2017 - 12:22 pm:

Royce - Please don't take this comment wrong, because you and several others on this thread have forgotten more about machine work than I ever knew, but your excellent pictures make me wonder about something:

Your photo of your measuring the telescoping gage with calipers makes it appear that the ends of the telescoping gage are quite flat. Or, at least perhaps not curved or rounded enough to give you an accurate measurement of the rather small inside bore such as the bore for the cam bearing. I realize that the small bore your are measuring is too small for a good quality inside micrometer to double check, but again, I have to wonder about the (hopefully) rounded ends of the telescoping gage being rounded enough to give you a "true" measurement of that bore for the cam bearing. If the shape or profile of the ends of the telescoping gage are too flat, that would tend to give you a reading that would reflect a very slightly smaller diameter of the bore instead of a true measurement.

Again, certainly not criticizing your work Royce,..... it's just that I have a recently purchased set of telescoping gages that were imported from (guess where) and my thought at time of purchase was that the nature of that tool is such that even tho' they were inexpensive Chinese tools, they would still give accurate measurements when measured with a good quality outside micrometer, however, I really do question the shape of the ends of the telescoping gages in this set that I have. It would not be surprising for the Chinese to inadvertently machine a telescoping gage with the ends too flat, especially on the smaller sized gages of my graduated size telescoping gage set. Again, just sort of wondering and "thinking-out-loud" Royce,.... FWIW,..... harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Monday, January 16, 2017 - 01:05 pm:

Harold,

The telescoping gages have a conical end, maybe it doesn't show well in the photos.

I machined the bearings on the outside to be .000 different than the measurement and tried them in the bore. Interference fit as expected. Then I installed each one on the lathe again and used a piece of crocus cloth to remove just a fraction while polishing the outside. I had to repeat this a couple times to sneak up on a perfect fit.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Monday, January 16, 2017 - 01:20 pm:

Ha,ha,.....",,,,,sneak up on a perfect fit" with crocus cloth! Love it!

And,....."conical end" shape on telescoping gages! I should have known that you wouldn't miss something like that Royce. Again, just sorta' "thinkn' out loud",....sorry if I wasted your time. However, I'll at least take this opportunity to tell you that I read (and I'm sure many others do too) I read and study your photos thoroughly and appreciate the time you take to make such great "tutorials" from which we can all learn,..... thanks Royce,..... harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Walt Berdan, Bellevue, WA on Monday, January 16, 2017 - 01:39 pm:

Royce,

Thank you for a great detailed explanation including bits that a novice might not think of. A while back when fitting some new cam bearings I found the OD to be OK but they were too long. I just cut one face to get the length without thinking of the possible alignment issue. It worked OK but your technique is best.

Good photos and thoughts all along in the posting.

Walt


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Monday, January 16, 2017 - 01:54 pm:

Harold,

There are no bad questions - just bad answers.

I have learned to double, triple, quadruple check everything when I am machining. And even then I stop and don't machine all the way without checking as I am getting close to the final goal. You can't put metal back once it is gone!

I did a lot more last weekend, just have not had time to resize and organize all the photos.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Monday, January 16, 2017 - 02:35 pm:

Yeah,..... the old adage,..... "measure twice and cut once", right? Well, I'm a guy that can very carefully do exactly that,..... AND STILL SCREW IT UP! (:^)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Sunday, January 22, 2017 - 11:00 am:

Getting back to the job again. Had to wait until a few more things came in the mail.

With the new Stipe 280 camshaft in place I checked valve clearance. The exhausts were OK at .020" but the intakes were not closing all the way. I had to grind all the intake valve stems to get the proper clearance using my handy Van Dorn valve grinding machine's stem tool. It takes two hands to operate so all you get is a shot of the machine on my work bench.



Then we use a bit of Clover lapping compound to get a good seal on the valve seats.



The exhaust valves are stellite and have the handy recess to fit an original valve lapping tool


The intakes are newer and so I have to use a suction cup on them.



(Message edited by royce on January 22, 2017)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Sunday, January 22, 2017 - 11:10 am:

Thanks, Royce.

Done that before - twirl, lift, reposition, repeat. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Sunday, January 22, 2017 - 11:11 am:

With the valves all lapped, a bit of Berrymans B12 spray is used to clean out all the ports, and to clean all the valves. The stems are oiled and we can install the valve springs and caps and pins.





The front cover and side covers can go on.





A centering tool is used to make sure the timer alignment is spot on:



The side cover gaskets are cut out to prevent oil from becoming trapped between the covers and their gaskets, which leads to lots of mess.



A dab of silicone is put on the threads before running the nuts down snug.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Sunday, January 22, 2017 - 11:22 am:

The pan was cleaned inside and out in the parts washer along with all the bolts. Gaskets are cemented in place. The access door was installed with RTV on the bolts to seal them completely.



Last look in here before closing it up. The pan is installed, leaving out the bolts that hold the engine pans to the engine.



The pedal fixture is installed on the hogshead to keep the pedals in position while dropping the hogshead in place.



The hogshead gasket surface is cleaned off with a 120 grit aluminum oxide disk in a high speed motor.



A bead of "The Right Stuff" about 1/4" was put in place of the felt seal. A 1/8" bead was run on the gasket surface, then smoothed out with a popsicle stick before dropping the hogshead in place.



A closer look showing the ty - wraps holding the bands. This allows the nuts to be on the shafts, eliminating any possibility of dropping a nut or washer into the transmission.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Sunday, January 22, 2017 - 11:25 am:

Four of the hogshead bolts were installed, then the engine rotated on its nose so the ball cap can be installed before tightening all the hogshead bolts the final time. The engine was wiped down with enamel thinner and the hogshead masked off before painting it.



Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Art Wilson on Sunday, January 22, 2017 - 10:47 pm:

Hi Royce,
Your pedal holding fixture is a great idea. For only occasional or one time use I think it could be made out of wood and drywall screws.
Thanks for the pictures.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Duey_C on Monday, January 23, 2017 - 08:57 pm:

I would have never thought about that oil dam behind number 4 rod in the pan, an area that has always bothered me about plentiful oil. So simple!
Art's on the money too!
Looking for more and thank you!
I've stolen that pan pic for my own reference Royce. That OK? Thanks. :-)

(Message edited by Duey_C on January 23, 2017)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Monday, January 23, 2017 - 09:31 pm:

Duey if you look closely at the engine you will see it has both left and right inside oil lines. My dad thought a lot about oil delivery and made those modifications.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Duey_C on Monday, January 23, 2017 - 11:49 pm:

Uh huh! I saw the other oil line yesterday! I looked at that pic and.... Hey! The OTHER internal oil line! :-) Long before I caught the oil dam at the back.
Thanks for bringing that back up on my radar today and may I say your dad was a very astute man. More oil is best.

(Message edited by Duey_C on January 23, 2017)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les VonNordheim on Tuesday, January 24, 2017 - 12:34 am:

Happy you did not need to remove any material on the block when using the 280 cam to keep the tappets from binding. I was unable to rotate the Stipe 280 cam in my 13 engine until material was removed from inside the block for tappet clearance.


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