On the porch

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2017: On the porch
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Sunday, January 01, 2017 - 11:35 am:

These service station attendants are ready to leap into action when you need gas or your windows cleaned!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Tomaso - Longbranch,WA on Sunday, January 01, 2017 - 11:56 am:

That is a very cool photograph, Royce !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Sunday, January 01, 2017 - 12:09 pm:

Looking at the way that porch was constructed and meshing that to a recent encounter I had with a building inspector.....I'd like to build one just like that just to see if he would go into heart failure!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dallas landers on Sunday, January 01, 2017 - 12:23 pm:

What they dont realize is the the chicken has escaped!
That is a very cool pic for so many reasons
Thanks Royce


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By ALAN FAIRCLOUGH from Houston, TEXAS on Sunday, January 01, 2017 - 12:44 pm:

Or if you want your wheels removed...
Permanently.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Schreiber- Santa Isabel Ecuador on Sunday, January 01, 2017 - 12:46 pm:

Has been posted before, but a great photo


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Harper - Keene, NH on Sunday, January 01, 2017 - 12:53 pm:

Ah, the good old days.....
when you could get "satisfying" lung cancer.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Lenney Glenn on Sunday, January 01, 2017 - 02:09 pm:

This photo brings back memories of the stores of the early fifties in northwestern N,C,.I remember the hole in the floor with a hinged cover that the merchant would shove a chicken through that had been brought in by a customer. Taking chickens to the store was a common way to pay the grocery bill back then. BTW as has been mentioned it looks as if old Cleghorn Leghorn has flown the coop.Lenney Glenn


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Barker - Dayton, OH on Sunday, January 01, 2017 - 02:37 pm:

Great photo, Royce. Thanks for posting it again.

Alan - Maybe I'm not too quick on the uptake. What do you mean? Why would someone pulling into a service station want their wheels removed "permanently"? Guess they'd have to tow their vehicle home afterwards, with no wheels, that is, right? Unless they had another set to have the attendants mount for them. Is this what you're referring to? Just looking for some clarification. Thanks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Jefferson, Ohio on Sunday, January 01, 2017 - 03:23 pm:

What a great photo and will soon be my screen saver. I see the gas pump has fuel up in the glass ready to fill up but what is the other pump on the porch? Is it for oil? I see a pipe under the porch going to it perhaps from a tank. The only thing missing in that picture is a checker board game.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Lloid on Sunday, January 01, 2017 - 04:17 pm:

Royce what a great pic I down loaded it to my home PC. That's the best drinking a cola on a hot day and that pump needs to be in front of my garage. Tim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Sunday, January 01, 2017 - 04:28 pm:

This famous photo has been copied hundreds of times. That's no surprise. It's a great picture. I've seen a colorized version, but a Google image search doesn't turn it up.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Walter Higgins on Sunday, January 01, 2017 - 05:51 pm:

This shows the colorized version. Perhaps someone more industrious can post it if it is acceptable to do so:

http://www.strangefarmer.com/content/item/184123.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Walter Higgins on Sunday, January 01, 2017 - 05:54 pm:

Ha, I just noticed it's actually a different photo of the same setting. Interesting.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Sunday, January 01, 2017 - 09:40 pm:

Gave it a shot.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Sunday, January 01, 2017 - 09:57 pm:


A little bigger.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Sunday, January 01, 2017 - 10:12 pm:

What kind of pump is that, and where can I get one ? :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed Baudoux Grayling Michigan on Sunday, January 01, 2017 - 10:43 pm:

If I am not mistaken, this building still exists. Off to Googlesville I go.......


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed Baudoux Grayling Michigan on Sunday, January 01, 2017 - 10:48 pm:

Yep. Google "Gordonton General Store"


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed Baudoux Grayling Michigan on Sunday, January 01, 2017 - 10:49 pm:

http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=26508


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Gitts - Ferndale, WA on Monday, January 02, 2017 - 01:21 am:

The visible pump I believe is a Fry model 117 (Mae West). I have no idea what the smaller pump on the porch is. Hopefully, a gas pump collector will enlighten me, as I'm curious.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Monday, January 02, 2017 - 06:41 am:

That's a free range chicken


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Lenney Glenn on Monday, January 02, 2017 - 08:09 am:

I read elsewhere that this is a 1939 rural N.C. photo . If this is correct very few folks had electricity. Therefore I think the small pump is for kerosene for the old oil lamps. The store evidently had electricity as I see a small breaker/fuse box. Lenney


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Monday, January 02, 2017 - 08:43 am:

While not as common as it once was, you can still find old houses and country store buildings around here that have columns like that, and also the occasional one with stacked stone pillars. Up until very recently, there was an old storage shed behind a house in town that had one corner supported by a stump.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Monday, January 02, 2017 - 08:45 am:

If you look at the men in the different photos you will see variations in the poses.
Is this because one is a photo and others a painting or frames from a film?
I noticed that on the left hand side of the porch that the frame of the porch floor is notched to fit the stacked rocks about as much as the thickness of the top rock. I guess they wanted to get it just right so it would be level.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed Baudoux Grayling Michigan on Monday, January 02, 2017 - 08:56 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Monday, January 02, 2017 - 09:38 am:

Also in the colourized version Foghorn has completely disappeared I guess making good on his escape.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Willis Jenkins on Monday, January 02, 2017 - 10:03 am:

No, I'll clean my own Windows, thank you!

Willis


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank Harris from Long Beach, CA on Monday, January 02, 2017 - 10:20 am:

I don't know about your Maw but we've got pop on ice.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Monday, January 02, 2017 - 10:37 am:

The original negative for this image was made by Dorothea Lange. There are variants taken of the same porch. Google her name and click on images ... you'll see many great photographs taken by her during the dust bowl era.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown North Central Arkansas on Monday, January 02, 2017 - 11:03 am:

Stacked rock foundations were the
standard or normal way of building in the rural Ozark mountains of Arkansas and Missouri. With little to no money, Its about all you had ... Here is our 1873 log cabin with stacked rock foundation. I remember stores similar to the one above, in all the dirt road towns around here. When they started paving all the dirt roads in the late sixties and early seventies, the little stores started to disappear. I have sat on lots of porches like that, drinking a cold Dr Pepper eating a Moon Pie and playing music. It would have been uncommon for a store in this area to not have a guitar, fiddle, and banjo for the locals to use when at the store if the "urge" hit them to play. And I do not mean junky old instruments. They were usually a Martin or a Gibson ... high quality instruments. As to the chicken. Chickens and Guinea Hens were allowed to "free range" to keep the ticks and bugs under control. The chickens and guinea hens under the houses or stores kept the bugs out of the house. The old days were tough, but I miss a lot of the things from back then .... have fun and be safe Donnie Brown ...

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